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A trainer's accomplishments - important?

This is a discussion on A trainer's accomplishments - important? within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category

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        12-04-2013, 02:20 PM
      #21
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thatkrayz    
    It's already been said that some judges barely even consider the rider and skill level, and soley judge based off the horse and pedigree.
    Wow! I have to say that's quite a harsh statement here. I've seen some "cheap" horses to kick arses at the dressage competitions (jumping too). In fact my trainer showed "non-dressagy bred" horses very successfully at the higher levels. It's all about conformation, williness, and training. And BTW If you don't know how to ride you won't look good even on schoolmaster (and won't be able to ask it correctly).

    As for showing, for many people dressage shows are to learn and to improve. Not to get high scores or to show off your ribbons. You get a feedback from someone respected who see your mistakes (if you are lucky enough you can even talk to judge about what you did not so great), and it helps big time. So yeah, I prefer working with the trainer who actually is willing to learn (and showing is part of learning, as well as going to conferences or taking clinics with those top world rider/trainers).
         
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        12-04-2013, 03:08 PM
      #22
    Trained
    IMHO you need to look for a trainer with a good track record and expect that if you improve and raise your goals your will probably need to change trainers. Do NOT rush into hiring a trainer. Go talk to people who have hired this trainer in the past and see what they think.
    Also, so MUCH today is based on $cost.
    I agree with Duffy, there are many people who can ride and train your horse but cannot teach it to anyone, but there are also many people who CAN train and ride and teach you. Nobody is getting rich training horses and riders.
    Most people have a goal--ribbons in the show ring. If you trainer cannot get your there and that is your goal, you WILL be dissatisfied, even if your trainer makes both you and your horse better. Such is the show world where often animation scores over relaxed well trained gaits.
    So...you really should decide what you want and revisit your goals often, and be willing to say goodbye to one and hello to another. It's just a business deal, anyway.
    thatkrayz likes this.
         
        12-04-2013, 03:32 PM
      #23
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Incitatus32    
    To me showing and winning is just something done on the side. It's so political nowadays that the worst riders can place high if they're on the right horse with the right bloodlines imo.
    Whoa, now. Let's not all attack.

    First of all, like my comment mentioned, I was not the only person in this thread to share this sentiment. As quoted above. I never said that ALL judges are like this. And I never said that it SHOULD be like this. I hope, and expect, that a judge bases their scores solely off of the rider's and horse's skills. But that's just not reality - at least in my neck of the woods.

    "That's just something that people who do poorly say. It's called being a bad loser. I've earned every single one of my 40% tests by riding like a sack of flaming dog poo. And I've earned all my 70% tests as well, by riding well." -That's great for you. Congratulations.

    And, also, I don't show. So, no "sore loser" here to make excuses for not winning ribbons. Let's clear that up right now.

    "I think it's silly to think that someone who can't go out and ride a test in front of an FEI judge and earn a decent score has any right to be telling others how to ride." - That's a little harsh. Some people have no plans on ever reaching FEI level, so why would they need their trainer to do the same? Basic dressage techniques can be taught by many people that don't reach that level. It all depends on the goals and expectations of the rider.

    "Wow! I have to say that's quite a harsh statement here. I've seen some "cheap" horses to kick arses at the dressage competitions (jumping too)." - I've witnessed this myself. When I did show, my horse was a OTTB with crappy conformation, who probably had no business being in a show ring. But, we kept up with the best of the them, and took home plenty of reserve, and champion, ribbons. I have nothing against a "cheap" horse. Cause, again, "cheap" is relative.


    :)
         
        12-04-2013, 04:28 PM
      #24
    Super Moderator
    I agree with Daffy in that not all good riders can teach. Not all good riders can necessarily see where a horse is going wrong, they could if they were riding it but not on the ground.

    No matter how good a horse is of a numpty os riding it then it will not go as well as it should.
    People in the UK will,often complain that the professional showing riders place better than they do even of they have the better horse. This is because the pros know how to get the best out of their ride and all the tricks of showing a horse to the best of its abilities.

    I want a trainer to know what they are talking about and the ability to improve me and my horse. Trainers that I used were all,very experienced and although some no longer rode, they had the experience of competing at a very high level.
         
        12-04-2013, 06:07 PM
      #25
    Trained
    Here I go again with the same comment.
    SHOW BELOW YOUR LEVEL.
    The people who win consistently in the show ring are just like the people that win in the working world. They and their horse have mastered their level before they show in that level.
    You are shooting yourself in the foot when you attempt to show off at something that you have just learned. You MIGHT score big, but you are just as likely to not and then you may be looking for excuses for why the winners are luckier than you or wealthier than you, etc.
    Honestly, I see no point in showing if you and your horse don't enjoy the whole thing. Really, I won't show bc I'd have to clip my horses and couldn't just let them have most of their year in turnout. Especially in December they NEED their feathers and the hair in their ears.
    Still, I appreciate those of you who DO show bc you are constantly training your horses, just like I appreciate parents who train their children before taking them to a restaurant. =D
    Chiilaa likes this.
         
        12-04-2013, 06:24 PM
      #26
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Corporal    
    Here I go again with the same comment.
    SHOW BELOW YOUR LEVEL.
    The people who win consistently in the show ring are just like the people that win in the working world. They and their horse have mastered their level before they show in that level.
    You are shooting yourself in the foot when you attempt to show off at something that you have just learned. You MIGHT score big, but you are just as likely to not and then you may be looking for excuses for why the winners are luckier than you or wealthier than you, etc.
    Honestly, I see no point in showing if you and your horse don't enjoy the whole thing. Really, I won't show bc I'd have to clip my horses and couldn't just let them have most of their year in turnout. Especially in December they NEED their feathers and the hair in their ears.
    Still, I appreciate those of you who DO show bc you are constantly training your horses, just like I appreciate parents who train their children before taking them to a restaurant. =D
    Totally agree with you. My trainer will not let you show her horses unless she's certain you can score in the 70's! So a lot of students are working on 3rd level but showing at 1st level or working on GP and showing at 4th level. It just makes sense.
    Corporal likes this.
         
        12-05-2013, 01:49 AM
      #27
    Weanling
    I didn't read the entire thread, but here is my opinion on the initial question. I do believe a trainer's awards/accomplishments are important. They give you a pretty good idea of a trainer's riding abilities. Just because a they have won a lot of ribbons does not necessarily make them a good instructor for people. If there is a trainer you are interested in, you should ask around about them. See what kind of feed back current/former students give you. Look at the current/former students' accomplishments under that trainer. Finally, watch a few lessons that the instructor gives. That will give you a pretty good idea of how good they are and how well you will mesh with them.

    With that said though, accomplishments/awards aren't everything. Don't discount a potential trainer who isn't at the top levels. If they ride intermediare 1 personally, they might be a great instructor through 3rd level. My personal trainer showed Prix St. George back in the 80's and then completely lost interest in showing when her 12yr gelding tore a ligament. She then put her focus into breaking,/training young horses, retraining problem horses, and teaching lessons. She is capable of training riders/horses, successfully, through third level. We've talked that when I'm ready, several years from now, she will help me find another trainer who can progress me even further along.

    Hope that helps you figure out how to pinpoint a good trainer. :)
         

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