Your most humbling experience-DO TELL! - Page 3
 
 

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Your most humbling experience-DO TELL!

This is a discussion on Your most humbling experience-DO TELL! within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category

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        11-24-2012, 11:03 PM
      #21
    Weanling
    Woops. Again.
         
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        11-24-2012, 11:32 PM
      #22
    Weanling
    I took my 1st horse, 13 y o Cecil, to a clinic with a really big name trainer, a 6-time Olympian and "I" level judge. 1st lesson went pretty well, and at the end she was outlining a show plan. She said if we worked hard all winter, we could come out 2nd L, tidy up his jumper changes and go 3rd by the following fall, ...."This horse is easily a PSG horse..."

    My trainer, listening to this glowingly optimistic plan, leaned over to the BNT and said,"Do you know this horse is coming 14?"

    To which BNT, addressing the peanut gallery, says "Oh. Well. He's almost DEAD, then."

    BNT the next day told me my Cecil was a Ferrari, and I was riding him like he was a dump truck. HELLO

    And she got on and proceeded to make that horse of mine SO HAPPY and gorgeous...of course!

    Despite the above, I loved riding with this great lady, and cliniced with my 2nd boy with her also.
         
        11-26-2012, 06:07 AM
      #23
    Foal
    I was a demo rider for the L program. I rode a First Level Test 3 test for the participants to score. We start the test, and my horse is moving like a well-oiled machine. She's balanced, soft, swinging happily through her back. When I asked her to lengthen across the diaganol, she actually lengthened! I was so extremely proud of her and how hard she had tried!

    We finish the test, and then the participants of the L program proceeded to discuss every single footfall of the test. 50 people sitting in front of you explaining why they gave you a 5 on whatever movement, each person taking their turn. 50 people explaining, over and over and over, that the horse lacked engagement, had absolutely no lengthens at all, basically ripped us to shreds. And all I could do was sit there and listen. Not one nice thing was said about any part of the test.

    They FINALLY released me to take my horse back to her stall. It felt like the walk of shame.

    I wanted to quit dressage for good right then and there. I untacked my horse, gave her a treat, and then just sat on a hay bale feeling like the worst rider in the world.

    ***
    A little later, my trainer stopped by and said the "i" judge that was leading the L candidates scored me at a 63%.
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        11-26-2012, 01:30 PM
      #24
    Teen Forum Moderator
    The one that comes to mind for me was when I first started taking reining lessons this spring. I haven't been riding for nearly as long as many of you, I started when I was 12 and am now 16, so that makes four years. However, up until these lessons I had basically been taught by being sat on a horse and letting me work it out myself. Anything that I knew came from trial and error, buckets of studying, and the occasional pointer from one of the trainers at our farm.

    I'm used to riding our lesson and ranch horses to tune them up for the cowboys and lesson kids, so I generally have to use quite a bit of leg when I'm riding without realizing it. So when I'm handed my new trainer's horse I have no idea what kind of ride I'm in for.

    This gelding is a nice, big, hefty type of Quarter Horse gelding that looks as slow as molasses. So I mount up, nice and prideful, thinking I'm going to show this trainer just how good I am. After all, I'm used to the slow guys that take a lot of work to get going.

    The trainer tells me to trot out, so I gather my reins and give him a nice squeeze in the girth to send him forwards. And we definitely go forwards...at a very strong canter, careening around like drunkards xD

    Now I've always had problems with cantering new horses, because I struggle with keeping my core steady but relaxed and end up jarring around a bit when I'm not careful. Being taken by suprise, I ofcourse start bouncing something aweful all over this poor animal's back , and he doesn't like that one bit. Instead of just stopping or giving a buck, he leaps into the air and gives me the most beautiful capriole you can imagine, lands, and does another- then stops dead as I fly gracefully over his neck...and into my trainer's chest, sending us both flying.

    I quickly stood up, dusted myself off, and helped my trainer up (who, by the way, has to be atleast 70). To his credit, he didn't scream at me or order me off of his property, but rather very calmly adjusted his cowboy hat and glasses, stroked his beard a bit and pointed at me. "You know" he said, "I do think that both you and Bubby (the horse) are both much better suited to dressage than reining...I didn't even know that darned horse was light enough to jump, much less pretend to be one of them fancy lipizzaner stallies."

    I never did ride Bubby again after that first day, and my next lesson was on a lunge line with no reins or stirrups on what he called an 'old plodder' mare of his at a walk and trot xD she had to be almost as old as he was. I have to say though...that darned horse was probably still more responsive than the horses that I usually ride!


    To their credit though, those 12 lessons helped me more than all of the four years of riding that I've had combined. That man and his wanna-be dressage horse knew their stuff, even if he did have some strange ways of teaching them. Riding with just a piece of thread as reins and being told not to break it if I wanted to live being just one of them! XD
         
        11-26-2012, 02:10 PM
      #25
    Started
    One of my friend's employees quit by doing a no call/no show. My friend called me in a panic asking if I had time to stop by and work a few of her TBs, "nothing hard or too long. Just trot them once around the track, hand gallop one time around the track, and trot one time around the track again." Of course I said I could ride a few for her.

    By the time I pulled up the first horse was already tacked up, standing by the track waiting for me. I threw on my half chaps over my jeans, put my helmet on (yes I wore a helmet that time), and got a leg up from one of her grooms. I started doing what I was told, trotted once around the track, then picked up a gallop. Well...silly me forgot to check the girth because I was in a rush to get on the first horse, my saddle slid and I hit the ground. Her groom ran over to me to fix the saddle and then throw me back on the horse.

    I finished that horse and worked 3 more after. When I got home, I realized that I had spilt my jeans when I fell. I rode 4 horses with everyone being able to see what panties I decided to wear that day.
    Poseidon, egrogan, LikeaTB and 1 others like this.
         
        11-26-2012, 02:39 PM
      #26
    Green Broke
    I was boarding with my trainer at the time who lives on a very secluded property. I tacked up my QH, lunged her a bit like normal, everything was fine so I took her to the mounting block and when I went to hop on, she took off, I let go, stumbled a bit and went down. No real bumps, bruises or scrapes, so I pop up and hear someone yelling over the fence if I was ok. Look over and there is a CROWD of people next door all watching someone ride. A CROWD! I had never seen anyone other than maybe a kid feeding horses prior. I yell back I'm fine and stupidly decide my horse must have spooked, catch her and go to hop back on.

    Just as my I am in the air above my saddle, my QH EXPLODED, I slam into the saddle and she is going round and round the arena at a dead run, bucking for all she's worth. I have one stirrup (which I promptly lost), she does an amazing buck, twist and head rip which yanks the reins out my hands, broke my right wrist and I was like oh sh!t. Wasn't about to bail, since I was 100% sure she'd trample me, so I took a hold of my grab strap with my left hand and for the next 20 minutes rode out my bucking bronco. She finally came to somewhat of a halt (more like a pause to catch her breath and start again) so I slid off.

    Dragged her sorry a$$ into the barn, threw her in the cross ties and went to find my trainer. Get back to the barn with her and the ENTIRE CROWD has crossed the irrigation ditch and is there. My trainer convinces them I am ok, they go back, she lunges my horse until she was wishing she was dead and gets me back on her and we are slowly walking around the arena with my trainer literally holding her bridle and one of the crowd comes over.

    I then find out this lady is the trainer of MY trainer and was giving a high level dressage lesson and a ton of students and whatnot had all come to watch. Tells me what an awesome rider I am to not have fallen off, that my trainer must be doing a great job and leaves. Fast forward a year and my trainer announces I have "outgrown" her and she's scheduled a lesson with her trainer for me! Umm.. ok, it's been a year, nasty QH was given away, I have an adorable lil Morgan, she won't remember that event right? Oh heck no, first words when the trainer arrived, hey, you're the person that can ride ANYTHING! OMG I've never seen such a ride outside an actual rodeo before!

    Um yeah ok, lets forget that and move on..... but no. My now trainer feels the need to tell anyone and everyone all about how "I can ride the nastiest horse with the biggest bucks she's ever seen". Just the intro you really want when she's introducing you to other Dressage riders/trainers/judges. /sigh.....
         
        11-26-2012, 06:10 PM
      #27
    Teen Forum Moderator
    Hahaha, sounds like you made a real impression on her, Delfina!
         
        11-26-2012, 06:28 PM
      #28
    Yearling
    Took my boy Peanut to our first schooling show together, was SO excited about showing him off to everyone. We had been working hard and I just *knew* we would do well. Wrong. I started with Intro B just to get warmed up and used to things. Not only did we go MUCH faster (aka out of control) than we should have, he jumped out of the arena.. twice. As if that weren't bad enough, at the year end awards I received "Best Unplanned Exit".

    First picture is when we were supposed to be in a walk/trot test. Second picture is right after he jumped out of the arena the second time. I couldn't stop laughing.
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        11-26-2012, 10:20 PM
      #29
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Endiku    
    .........
    I quickly stood up, dusted myself off, and helped my trainer up (who, by the way, has to be atleast 70). To his credit, he didn't scream at me or order me off of his property, but rather very calmly adjusted his cowboy hat and glasses, stroked his beard a bit and pointed at me. "You know" he said, "I do think that both you and Bubby (the horse) are both much better suited to dressage than reining...I didn't even know that darned horse was light enough to jump, much less pretend to be one of them fancy lipizzaner stallies."

    I never did ride Bubby again after that first day, and my next lesson was on a lunge line with no reins or stirrups on what he called an 'old plodder' mare of his at a walk and trot xD she had to be almost as old as he was. I have to say though...that darned horse was probably still more responsive than the horses that I usually ride!


    To their credit though, those 12 lessons helped me more than all of the four years of riding that I've had combined. That man and his wanna-be dressage horse knew their stuff, even if he did have some strange ways of teaching them. Riding with just a piece of thread as reins and being told not to break it if I wanted to live being just one of them! XD
    Thank you for sharing that, quite wonderful
         
        11-27-2012, 02:09 PM
      #30
    Weanling
    I'm almost too embarrassed to share this story, but it taught me some very important lessons: slow down, relax, have patience, and most of all PAY ATTENTION!

    So it was the day before a show we went to one summer. The day was hot and I'd spent the day bathing the horse I was riding, cleaning out the trailer, packing the trailer, preparing feeds for both horses that were going, etc. The truck that was to pull the trailer (driven by the other rider's boyfriend) was late that day, and normally I'm a very patient person, but I think the heat and being hungry was starting to get to me. There was also the post-bath struggle with my horse of yes-I'll-let-you-eat-grass-but-don't-you-dare-roll going on. Anyway, when the truck finally arrived and we had hooked up the trailer, we loaded the horses. The other rider's mare went in first and she was tied. Someone led the gelding I was riding into the trailer and then passed me the lead rope to tie him. I started to tie as soon as they handed it over and I was just finishing my knot when the gelding started to struggle. I couldn't really see what was going on, so I pulled the knot free (thank goodness for quick release!) and my poor boy stumbled out backwards and scraped his head. He was alright, but I felt TERRIBLE!

    Needless to say, his freak out was my fault because I'd started tying him before he had all 4 feet in the trailer, simply due to impatience and lack of communication with the people around me. I was just so eager to get to the show that I wasn't paying attention. Well, huge lesson learned there! Especially knowing it could have been MUCH worse with a different horse. My boy was shaken up a little, but he wasn't injured, thankfully. That's an experience I'll never forget, especially since I wasn't new to loading horses into trailers and I really should have known better. I still feel bad about it when I think of it!
         

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