Antique Carriage information wanted - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Driving

Antique Carriage information wanted

This is a discussion on Antique Carriage information wanted within the Driving forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • History of carriage stool seat
  • Does the rounded part of a wheel bearing face in or out on a driving cart for horse

Like Tree14Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-16-2013, 07:41 AM
  #21
Foal
I can't wait to try and find a date on it to see from what year it is. Someone told me that the year might be on the axe of the wheel, meaning we will have to take a wheel of to try and find it. If only the weather would be better....need to be patient for now. Thank you so much again for the information. Keep it coming SO great to get some information on it and learn about the history of it.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-17-2013, 08:07 AM
  #22
Yearling
Adalira, try this gentleman.....john@greenallcarriage.com

He does carriage appraisals and sales. I do not know why I didn't think of him before...

Nancy
     
    06-18-2013, 09:37 AM
  #23
Green Broke
I saw an ad for a Pickering Float and the lines reminded me of your vehicle.
Pickering bro's in Liverpool.

pickering float carriage - Bing Images

Liverpool Gig - Carriage for sale Caton Nr Lancaster Dragon Driving
     
    06-18-2013, 01:59 PM
  #24
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taffy Clayton    
I saw an ad for a Pickering Float and the lines reminded me of your vehicle.
Pickering bro's in Liverpool.

pickering float carriage - Bing Images

Liverpool Gig - Carriage for sale Caton Nr Lancaster Dragon Driving
The linework does look like it a bit, however the ones in the photo are a lot smaller. So i'm not sure if it is the same kind of carriage. Thank you for the links though. The photos were beautiful!
     
    06-18-2013, 02:00 PM
  #25
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by greentree    
Adalira, try this gentleman.....john@greenallcarriage.com

He does carriage appraisals and sales. I do not know why I didn't think of him before...

Nancy
Thank you so much! I will contact him asap!
I also got an email from the carriage museum library with a link to someone that might be able to help.
The search continues!
     
    06-18-2013, 03:55 PM
  #26
Showing
I can't help but think, by how nicely this vehicle is turned out, that it was designed as a lady's carriage, possibly for shopping and church. By sitting in the middle she could likely tuck a wee child in beside her with another two sitting across. Are those doors on each side? Regardless they would help prevent road dirt from soiling her frock.
     
    06-19-2013, 10:14 AM
  #27
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
I can't help but think, by how nicely this vehicle is turned out, that it was designed as a lady's carriage, possibly for shopping and church. By sitting in the middle she could likely tuck a wee child in beside her with another two sitting across. Are those doors on each side? Regardless they would help prevent road dirt from soiling her frock.
Yes those are doors on each side. By pushing the handle the door opens and you close them by clicking the shut.
I remember when my grandmother used it she had (besides her) 3 adults in there with her so 4 adults in total or 3 smaller children on the one bench and an adult next to her and a big picknick basket on the front with sandwiches and drinks to stop somewhere in a big field or forest to take a break. The drives she did with the amazones, who rode on horses behind te carriage, would take about 4 sometimes 5 hours through forest and fields in the area.
greentree likes this.
     
    06-23-2013, 10:30 PM
  #28
Foal
The vehicle is a "sociable" of European origins. The squared 90% corners, lack of curved lines, and strong "utilitarian" aspect are typical of the vehicles made and found on the continent. US and English vehicles tended to have rounded curves and more "flair" to their design. They also tended to accomodate 4 passengers in a back to back arrangement, or two seats facing forward, as the "sociable" or "vis-a-vis" (French for "face to face") wasn't one of the more popular vehicles in the US/England because they usually demanded a coachman.There were a few US vehicles made to be driven privately by the owner which featured dash seats, but those generally had small "foot stool" type seats that folded down when needed and were flipped up out of sight when not used.

In this vehicle pictured the driver sat in the seat facing the horses (this vehicle was designed for a pair BTW), and any guests sat either next to the driver, or in the back facing seat. It isn't a child's carriage, or designed specifically for children. It was designed simply to accomodate 4 passengers. And it wasn't a gender specific carriage - it could equally be used by a lady or a gentleman.

I'm not sure you'll find a date on the axle, hub, or wheel. You might, however, look under the seat, or on the body framing to see if a number is stamped there. Depending upon what you find, the CAA may be able to help you ascertain if the number is clue to one of the European carriage manufacturers.

Taffy Clayton likes this.
     
    06-23-2013, 10:48 PM
  #29
Foal
Adding:

The type of wheel used is also an indication of age as certain styles of wheel came into the carriage world at certain times. It looks like it has Sarven wheel (straight line spokes) - a style that was patented in the 1850's in the US, and became popular in the 1870s because it was easier to make than offset hubs.

The type hubs would be your biggest, and most accurate clue to the era this carriage was made, short of finding a bill of sale.

In all it looks like a nice, sturdy, working type vehicle for traveling and picnics.
Taffy Clayton likes this.
     
    06-26-2013, 03:08 PM
  #30
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by allchestnuts    
The vehicle is a "sociable" of European origins. The squared 90% corners, lack of curved lines, and strong "utilitarian" aspect are typical of the vehicles made and found on the continent. US and English vehicles tended to have rounded curves and more "flair" to their design. They also tended to accomodate 4 passengers in a back to back arrangement, or two seats facing forward, as the "sociable" or "vis-a-vis" (French for "face to face") wasn't one of the more popular vehicles in the US/England because they usually demanded a coachman.There were a few US vehicles made to be driven privately by the owner which featured dash seats, but those generally had small "foot stool" type seats that folded down when needed and were flipped up out of sight when not used.

In this vehicle pictured the driver sat in the seat facing the horses (this vehicle was designed for a pair BTW), and any guests sat either next to the driver, or in the back facing seat. It isn't a child's carriage, or designed specifically for children. It was designed simply to accomodate 4 passengers. And it wasn't a gender specific carriage - it could equally be used by a lady or a gentleman.

I'm not sure you'll find a date on the axle, hub, or wheel. You might, however, look under the seat, or on the body framing to see if a number is stamped there. Depending upon what you find, the CAA may be able to help you ascertain if the number is clue to one of the European carriage manufacturers.


Good info !!! Thanks.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Former carriage horse retraining issues-advice wanted DimSum Driving 36 06-10-2012 10:41 AM
Antique Carriage, What Do You Think? ButtInTheDirt Driving 12 12-31-2011 09:23 AM
Brand Information Wanted! CB Ranch Horses Horse Talk 0 10-27-2011 04:44 PM
Saddle Brand Information Wanted Nan94me Horse Tack and Equipment 1 09-03-2011 11:59 PM
WANTED - information on a Percheron Gelding Sold in Ontario PerchiesKisses Horse Talk 1 12-11-2010 06:09 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0