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Cart question

This is a discussion on Cart question within the Driving forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Doctors buggy with pneumatic tires
  • Doctors buggy seats

 
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    09-16-2010, 01:08 AM
  #1
Yearling
Cart question

I'm browsing the cart market at the moment (getting a feel for new and used prices), but the problem is I don't know what I should be looking for. I know I want a two seater, light weight but durable enough to carry me and my dad.
Terrain would be pavement, possibly with some gravel in between if I pop down to the Amish for something. But, for the most part, easy going on paved rodes

Divo stands roughly 14hh and weighs in around 900-1,000lbs. I haven't measured him exactly yet, but he's relatively small. Should I be looking for a two wheeled cart, or a more roomy four wheeler? Which is easier to pull?

I also have a cart-horse-in-the-making (give him another four or five years ) who'll mature in the 15-15.2hh range, 1100-1200 (guesstimating). Possibly even a bit bigger, he'll be a 'medium' light horse. Not super stocky, but not as lean as say a TB. What would you say he could comfortably pull?

Thanks in advance guys :) I'm pretty lost here xD
     
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    09-16-2010, 09:22 AM
  #2
Green Broke
I would look for a horse cart. As far as I know they have one bench seat. A horse can pull two people safely and uo to four depending on the amount of training in the beginning. I would start out with two people and work from there. ???
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    09-16-2010, 12:08 PM
  #3
Foal
Are you wanting to haul stuff to-from the Amish? If so I would say get a four wheel wagon. A two wheel will not have any way to carry much of anything but you and your dad. Also get something with car tires (tires with air in them) Pneumatic tires don't look as pretty, but they are much easier for the horse to pull. A two wheel cart is easier to deal with alot of the time, but sometimes aren't balance correctly.
     
    09-16-2010, 03:22 PM
  #4
Yearling
I would be looking for something that could pull two people safely, no more than that, and possibly have a small area in the back for some light-weight cargo. My only concern with Divo is that he's so small. He's certainly a tough little booger, but he's...just so SMALL!

I was considering something along this lines of this:

But instead of a seat in the back, have a little area where I could lash down, say, chickens I want to take to the auction, some produce, stuff like that. Picnic basket for a light lunch


My youngster (he's only about a year in a half, currently) should be able to pull a Doctors Buggy, Wagonette, something more along those lines, I think. He looks like he'll be a relatively good sized horse.

I'm just so afraid of overloading them with too big of a cart, I'll find something I like then google the bejeezus outta it to see what kind of horses are pulling it normally XD

Both are getting extensive training so that's not an issue. Starting with sacking out, moving up to at-liberty work, long line work, ground driving, dragging, etc. etc. etc.

I've never personally trained a horse to drive before, but it seems doable with proper ground work and patience. Both Divo and the new guy (he doesn't have a name yet :lol) in my opinion have the head for it. Their both very trusting and tend to just accept new things as they come along. Divo reacted to the Evil Plastic Bag by giving it a sniff then seeing if it was edible. Asking him to drag 'uber spooky evil things' behind him such as cans, PVC pipe with rocks and things in it, and whatever else I can get my hands on should be fun.

If I really wanted and worked daily, I could probably have Divo driving within a month he's so darned eager to please and ready to learn. Once I get my surcingle, it's going to be at least another month of pure long lining and ground driving before he even sees a saddle.
We're not skipping anything on training. Next time I'm out there, I want to see how nasty the pond is, if it's in decent condition I'm going to see if I can get him to follow me into it. I want to be able to wrap him in a tarp by the end of next week too.

Same goes for the lil' guy. Right now he has the attention span of a flea but he's very accepting of new stuff and very, very, curious. I'm kind of hoping his attention span will increase a little once I get him gelded
     
    09-19-2010, 01:34 AM
  #5
Started
Two wheeled carts are cheaper and easier to come by (at least in my area) but four wheeled are better and what I would recomend. I like the one you posted :) Horses can pull (the actually push a carriage vs pull... it comes from their hind end, pushes into the breast collar or collar and hames) a lot more than they can carry. A miniature can easily "pull" two adults. So as long as the cart is the appropriate size (horse size) you shouldn't have any problems once your horses are conditioned to it :)
     
    09-19-2010, 12:53 PM
  #6
Foal
I was told when I started driving that a 2 wheel cart was the safer way to start with for a green horse, as a 4 wheeled buggy is much easier to tip over should the horse spook, jump sideways, etc. I'm not a super experienced driver, so I'm not sure.
     
    09-20-2010, 03:11 AM
  #7
Started
I can only speak for marathon carts (four wheels) as that is what I'm familiar with, but they are MUCH safer than two wheeled carts, and less prone to tipping over. But maybe it's because of the driving they are designed for, vs other four wheel types...?
     
    09-20-2010, 04:52 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by CheyAut    
I can only speak for marathon carts (four wheels) as that is what I'm familiar with, but they are MUCH safer than two wheeled carts, and less prone to tipping over. But maybe it's because of the driving they are designed for, vs other four wheel types...?
A marathon carriage has a full turn gear. The one in the picture has a reach and if the horse turns tight the wheel hits the reach and will tip it over.
4 wheels weigh alot more and they need more experience to pull the weight
     
    09-21-2010, 11:15 AM
  #9
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by churumbeque    
A marathon carriage has a full turn gear. The one in the picture has a reach and if the horse turns tight the wheel hits the reach and will tip it over.
4 wheels weigh alot more and they need more experience to pull the weight
Perhaps I should look for a cart with turning gear? That raises an interesting question on how one gets around a sharp corner. I'd rather have a little more equipment and cost on a cart and be safer, than skimp and end up tipping over somewhere.

I'll probably train Divo to pull both a four wheel and a two wheel cart, since I also would like to show him with a cart. Not sure on my other guy yet, if I want to show him in cart or just train him as a road horse.
     
    09-21-2010, 01:00 PM
  #10
Green Broke
It is hard to find a traditional carriage (like the pic you posted) with a full turn gear. I have been looking for 3 yrs but it is easy to find a marathon type with the full turn gear.
     

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