"Driving is more dangerous" - Page 4
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Driving

"Driving is more dangerous"

This is a discussion on "Driving is more dangerous" within the Driving forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Driving high strung horses

Like Tree37Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-19-2013, 09:04 PM
  #31
Yearling
the video

If its the one im thinking of there was a wild bee nest there or wasp nest and the horses were geting stung by accounts that's what started it off im going to check it out if its the same class were the axedents happend.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    10-19-2013, 09:14 PM
  #32
Yearling
video

Yes its the same one I was told on a number of times by verious people that there was eather bees or wasps present and that's what started it off I had this discussion with a few people on here who pointed out the bees or wasps and the horses got stung aparantley.
All sports activatys with horses have a high risks even if you don't have a horse walking in the street is just as dangerous with cars ect.
What would you rather do enjoy life ride and drive or vegitate in front of the tv cucooned in your own little world as the world passes you by.
     
    10-20-2013, 01:42 AM
  #33
Yearling
I think the incident with the arabian driving class gone wrong was preventable.

If anyone pays close attention- look at the tail length on those horses! In order to keep their tails in pristine condition, those horses are often stalled. Being arabians, they do not get enough exercise when stalled, and come into the arena all hyper and ready to go. I don't see why most people would want to drive a horse like an arabian (as they are so high strung), and I don't see why it makes any sense to stall them all the time...

For those arabian people on here, I am sure there are some that do well at it, but most Arabians are not what I consider suitable for driving. I won't ever teach my TB to drive either- No thanks!

Driving should be reserved for a horse that is dead quiet and only spooks in place. The vast majority of horses do not match that description!

The only reason I am considering driving with my mare is because her spook is to flinch and stop. The only time she threw me off was when she stepped on the hose and it blasted on underneath her. She jumped forward a few strides and stopped and I slid off her hind end. She was only 2 when that happened.

Her reaction to being ground driven with poles? None. Her reaction to guns? None. If she looses the pole when ground driving, what does she do? She stops. If a deer jumps straight out of the bushes at her, what does she do? She stops. That is what you want in a good driving horse.
katiemule likes this.
     
    10-20-2013, 08:29 AM
  #34
Yearling
Yes, driving has the potential to be far more dangerous than riding is. It is so much easier to cowboy a horse into riding than into driving. Reason being, as long as you can sit on the horse, you can 'break' it, according to certain methods. No credible trainer is going to hook a cart to an untouched horse and just hold on. It takes a lot of work to get a horse responsive enough where putting a cart on them is even a good idea.

I recently hitched my mare to a cart for the first time. She did wonderfully, just needed to learn how to turn in the shafts. Before I even thought of putting the cart on her, I had her dragging tires, logs, chains, drags, etc to get her used to as much as I could. She has a pretty solid whoa, and if she doesn't understand something, or things start falling apart, she'll stop. Both good and bad, but I much prefer her to stop at the sign of trouble than get frustrated or flighty. I had her pulling a little 'wagon' that is the size of one small hay bale and we squeezed between a building and a metal trailer. When we turned, the wagon caught the trailer and made wretched noises. She took a step, the stopped to give me time to get the stuff untangled. Some horses are a bit more wise as driving horses than others, plain and simple.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 1234927_10201213616734959_188200078_n.jpg (65.3 KB, 68 views)
katiemule likes this.
     
    10-20-2013, 09:37 AM
  #35
Trained
If it means anything I'm scared to death of driving, but I'll hop on most any horse that's nutters...
     
    10-20-2013, 10:13 AM
  #36
Yearling
There are dangers in almost anything we do. What matter's is getting past our fears & doing what we enjoy.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Danee62.jpg (69.2 KB, 64 views)
katiemule likes this.
     
    10-20-2013, 11:23 AM
  #37
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4horses    
I think the incident with the arabian driving class gone wrong was preventable.

If anyone pays close attention- look at the tail length on those horses! In order to keep their tails in pristine condition, those horses are often stalled. Being arabians, they do not get enough exercise when stalled, and come into the arena all hyper and ready to go. I don't see why most people would want to drive a horse like an arabian (as they are so high strung), and I don't see why it makes any sense to stall them all the time...

For those arabian people on here, I am sure there are some that do well at it, but most Arabians are not what I consider suitable for driving. I won't ever teach my TB to drive either- No thanks!

Driving should be reserved for a horse that is dead quiet and only spooks in place. The vast majority of horses do not match that description!
First, arabians are not stalled ALL THE TIME. Some trainers keep them stalled, but they can go out to pasture with those tails. Tails are usually up and tied in a wrap to keep them safe.

Also, these arabs probably got out every day for exercise. It is a LARGE show they are at, so they have been worked much of their life. They love love love their jobs.

Again, the horse was stung by a bee. See if you can put bees on your horse and have them not spook.
natisha likes this.
     
    10-20-2013, 12:00 PM
  #38
Weanling
I do know the arab in the video was OK. He got some cuts and bumps and was put on stall rest for sometime.
Roux likes this.
     
    12-13-2013, 08:42 PM
  #39
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatieQ    
Well that is an absolutely horrifying video, and I am glad you posted it because I was considering taking up driving as a "retirement hobby"! I've changed my mind now!

Might as well give up driving cars too. Or fly. Or....well... living. Everything has danger to it. That's life.

That was an interesting video to see. If I were there, I think I would have brought my horse to the middle and unhitched. I am still determined to learn to drive. ;)
katiemule likes this.
     
    12-14-2013, 10:00 AM
  #40
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roux    
So I watched the video and now I have a few dumb questions ( I know NOTHING about driving) so sorry if this is really stupid?

1. In almost all tack that I use or have seen used there is a "quick release" or "breakaway" function to the tack. For example leather reins break if a horse steps through them so that way they can get free and not hurt.
Do carts (sorry if that is the wrong term) not have a quick release if a horse gets in trouble? This might be dumb because obviously if the cart is being pulled you would not want it to break free but something that has can break away if the cart tips over etc?

2. When the first horse became upset would it have been too difficult to get the other horses to leave the arena to get them out of harms way? Most of the horses looked like they were handling the commotion well and looked like they could have exited safely. What about un-tacking them quickly and just getting a halter on so that why if the did spook it was without the cart?

3. Wouldn't it have been better to let the horse run itself out or just stop on its own, the first horse was obviously using its panicked brain but with so many of those men (not trying to criticize but I thought that made it worse) chasing it and yelling it is no wonder why it kept panicking. Could they have tried to keep it on the out side and set up an inner perimeter to keep it from wrecking into the other horses instead of jumping in front of it?

4. At the end did the man with the rope do something to break the cart free from the horse? Does any one know if the second horse ever got up, it looks like it tripped on its tack? :(

5. What kind of horses were they - they were stunningly beautiful.

6. What about a pickup man or an out rider. If there was a saddle horse in the arena could it have joined up with the runaway and brought it down to a trot, walk and then stand still? I'm thinking like a pickup horse in rodeo or an out rider in TB racing but then again with all the rigging of the carts it would be horrible if another horse and rider were to get caught up in it. I have seen that work with panicked horses before but obviously not one dragging a cart and everything.

I have seen wrecks in rodeo, jumping etc... it seems like here it was a green horse that was nervous and then became a domino effect of one bad thing after another. Could have happened in any equestrian sport.

As far as dangerousness goes I agree with Enduku horses all ways have the potential of being dangerous, english, western, driving etc.

It's a risk we take but do everything to try to minimize.

Sorry another question:

One of the horses looks like its tail is pinned to the cart? Is that to keep it from dragging or getting caught up?
I don't know the answers to all of these, but I have been driving carriages in downtown Dallas for about four years now, so I might be able to help you a bit.

First of all, there is no "quick release" equipment unless you modify your harness. We use a lot of snaps and things that would break if a horse got hung up since most of our harnesses are made with biothane as opposed to leather.

In my experience, granted my driving is all done in the city as opposed to in arenas and on trails, but typically the horses act more like "what's wrong with him" as opposed to "Bob's freaking out omg end of the world everybody spook!" I didn't watch that particular video, but I have seen others that I'm certain are similar, and I would think to file everyone in the class out and deal with the runaway. He's toting a cart that could very well get hung up on another participant's vehicle if he got too close. One out of harms way, it would be easy to unhitch and halter to be safe.

In regards to chasing the horse, I understand they were trying to get the horse to slow down, but when your horse dumps you and takes off, if you yell and tell him to woah, is he going to? No. My OTTB gelding loves me so much he grooms me and comes when I call him in the pasture, but if he gets loose and I say "Sammy woah!" all he thinks is "crap mom's really pissed I'm not going near that!" Not to mention the horse, is already in a panicked state. An outrider sounds like a great idea for these situations. I'm not well versed in the competitive driving wields, so I don't have much insight for the rest of your questions, but hopefully I helped some!
     

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:47 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0