Former carriage horse retraining issues-advice wanted - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Driving

Former carriage horse retraining issues-advice wanted

This is a discussion on Former carriage horse retraining issues-advice wanted within the Driving forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Retraining a carriage horse
  • "short whip" horse chariot

Like Tree4Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-06-2012, 02:56 PM
  #11
Yearling
He is super responsive to voice, and I talk to him all the time. Heck, another quirk my spouse found was that if you say "Good Boy" in a bright tone of voice he stops dead. I didn't believe him until I tried it myself and sure enough. I've had 2 other people try saying it from the ground or on his back and then gelding just shuts down and drops his head. Rather disconcerting LOL, now we say "Niiiice" instead.

If I do not use the short dressage whip while trying to lunge him he will go out for maybe 2 circles and stop/turn and face me. Then the process starts over, with me having to talk him into going back out on the circle.

But with the short whip I can growl at him and shake the whip just slightly and keep him out on the circle.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-06-2012, 04:18 PM
  #12
Showing
I think his biggest problem is the fact the his other half isn't there. Horses driven as teams bond closely to the one beside them. He'd have gotten his turning guidance from his partner when going to the left, and his partner was likely the same going to the right. When teaching him to lunge, if you get to circles and he turns to face you, let him enjoy his little rest (reward) before you send him out again. If when he stops and he's looking at you with both eyes, that means his mind is on you.
     
    06-06-2012, 04:34 PM
  #13
Yearling
Ohhh Saddlebag you may have just hit the nail on the head! That does sound about right.
TexanFreedom likes this.
     
    06-06-2012, 07:55 PM
  #14
Green Broke
Grey S.. what type of horses do you drive ?
     
    06-07-2012, 05:08 AM
  #15
Foal
Its quite normal for horses to be 'sticky' to lunge on one side or the other. Many will go well one way, but will evade on the other rein. It could be that your horse was able to turn to face his handler during his early training, and the handler may have frightened the horse with the whip in their effort to lunge him on that side.

Once a horse has learned this evasion it is quite difficult to train them out of it. Going after the animal with the whip only serves to send his quarters too far round, resulting in the horse facing the handler and, if the handler persists, the horse will work hard to prevent the handler getting down that side to send him on on the circle.

I find that working quietly with the horse in-hand and teaching him to yield his head/neck/shoulder to pressure, first from a training stick, then, progressively, from the hand and then the posture/energy of my body, I can persuade the horse to yield his fore end away, allowing me to step to the side and away as I focus on his quarters to send him on.

Because the horse has learned that he must yield his fore end, I can send him on and, if he attempts to evade by turning in, I can step in toward him and prevent him falling in and turning.

If you decide to try this, you will have to be watchful for the signs of the horse looking to evade, and deal quickly and decisively with it. You will have to be proactive in your lunging, and quick on your feet, and be aware of how your position in relation to the horse, as well as your posture/energy, will affect his going.

Oh, and you might want to lose the whip.
     
    06-07-2012, 03:51 PM
  #16
Yearling
Thanks for the thoughtful reply AengusOg :) . Well, the equine dentist was out today and while he was assessing Angus' teeth he looked at me and asked if I had issues going to the left. I explained the while lunging to the left = loss of mind and he told me there was a nasty hook and wave that could be very painful when his head was pulled around.

The dentist floated his teeth, trimmed back his canine teeth which were too long and pinching his tongue. Afterwards we walked into the arena and he went left on the lunge without so much as a stutter step. Goes to show that sometimes the answer is right in front of you!
     
    06-07-2012, 04:01 PM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenson    
Grey S.. what type of horses do you drive ?
A team of Percheron mares. And you?
     
    06-07-2012, 05:32 PM
  #18
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by DimSum    
Thanks for the thoughtful reply AengusOg :) . Well, the equine dentist was out today and while he was assessing Angus' teeth he looked at me and asked if I had issues going to the left. I explained the while lunging to the left = loss of mind and he told me there was a nasty hook and wave that could be very painful when his head was pulled around.

The dentist floated his teeth, trimmed back his canine teeth which were too long and pinching his tongue. Afterwards we walked into the arena and he went left on the lunge without so much as a stutter step. Goes to show that sometimes the answer is right in front of you!
Good Job!!!! It is so important to get teeth looked at by a reputable Dentist. How painful that must have been to get that reaction just from traveling to the left.
     
    06-07-2012, 05:39 PM
  #19
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taffy Clayton    
Good Job!!!! It is so important to get teeth looked at by a reputable Dentist. How painful that must have been to get that reaction just from traveling to the left.
Ya, I feel like a right idiot, I missed the other signs-a lil head tossing when asking to go left under saddle, etc. A vet I'm not familiar with did a pre-purchase exam, but all he said was "he has some minor hooks" so I trusted in that This dentist is very good, but in high demand so it took me a month after I bought the gelding to get him seen.
     
    06-07-2012, 07:13 PM
  #20
Weanling
If your going to get your horses teeth looked at, go with a farrier who has dental knowledge, that way if you need them sedated or something goes wrong, your in good hands. I have had several friends have bad experiences with supposed equine dentists, so it is safer to use a vet, least that is my opinion.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
bit advice -retraining bronc-y gelding Lins Horse Training 24 02-26-2012 04:43 PM
New horse in retraining, got some kinks - advice? FlyGap Horse Training 25 11-04-2011 01:08 PM
HELP ! advice on retraining pony ! uniqueSURPRISE Horse Training 4 02-28-2011 07:09 PM
Advice on retraining please! KristyBLovely Horse Training 6 10-14-2010 04:06 PM
Retraining an abused horse :( advice needed. Odissi Horse Training 35 08-06-2010 11:40 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0