Some help with driving, well equipment adjustment - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 99 Old 08-15-2012, 09:47 PM
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He is darling!!

I would move the shafts back a bit, you have another adjustment on your traces. Breeching and breast collar look good. And like said move the saddle back.
There are so many adjustments on a harness sometimes it is trial and error untill you get it adjusted the correctly.

I think it looks over all really good!
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post #22 of 99 Old 08-15-2012, 10:59 PM
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Yes - I think the saddle should sit behind the wither where it can settle just on the back. I like my breeching to have more play in it so that it only gets tight if we are going downhill - but that's my preference.

Man that is the cutest darn thing ever!

Oh and I used rustoleum all over my metal easy entry at least once every couple of years - that stuff works great!
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post #23 of 99 Old 08-15-2012, 11:20 PM
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[QUOTE=clippityclop;1647296]Yes - I like my breeching to have more play in it so that it only gets tight if we are going downhill - but that's my preference.

QUOTE]

My preferance is my breeching with very little play in it, about 4 inches.
I hate a horse that is sloppy in the shafts.
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post #24 of 99 Old 08-15-2012, 11:45 PM
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Only thing I can really contribute to the conversation (and only then because slidestop is a new driver) is that you never want to let the breeching hang too low below the point of the buttocks. With little donkeys like that on relatively flat ground, you'd probably never have a problem, but if you get involved with work horses, a too-low breeching can take their back legs out from under them when bracing a heavy load going downhill.

So many pictures on the internet have the breeching adjusted to be level or slightly below the stifle, but that's just wrong on 99% of horses (excluding those with really funky conformation). You'rs looks good and I certainly wouldn't let it down any more.

Oh, and the donkey is utterly adorable! Now you just need a tongued wagon and a set of team harness and you could drive them together .

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #25 of 99 Old 08-16-2012, 07:09 AM Thread Starter
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[QUOTE=Taffy Clayton;1647317]
Quote:
Originally Posted by clippityclop View Post
Yes - I like my breeching to have more play in it so that it only gets tight if we are going downhill - but that's my preference.

QUOTE]


My preferance is my breeching with very little play in it, about 4 inches.
I hate a horse that is sloppy in the shafts.
The breeching isn't to tight or to loose, I don't think. It activates (for lack of a better term) as soon we slow down or go down a tiny little hill. Does it look to loose?
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post #26 of 99 Old 08-16-2012, 07:15 AM Thread Starter
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Smrobs, I've been looking all over for an inexpensive one! They are just so darn expensive. It just makes more sense, especially because they are attached at the hip! Then they could also use take more riders at any events we have. Their original purpose was teaching driving lessons and to give "donkey rides" to. The woman who was driving them made it seem like you needed a PhD in rocket science to drive. A little common sense and lots of ground driving experience has taken me a LONG way.
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post #27 of 99 Old 08-16-2012, 08:43 AM
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I don't think the breeching is too loose, Looks great from the photo. Of course once you start driving only you can tell. I like mine to touch the rump snugly, (no indentation) at the extended trot. It also looks in the proper position, neither too high or to low.

I can't wait to see him in action.

I will say this though, I know this photo is to show the harness placement, but for any new, (or older) drivers out there.
One of the biggest and most enforced rules in the American Driving Society and any driving club is;

Never remove the bridle while the animal is hooked to the cart.

Infraction of this rule will get you immediatly disqualified from any event and asked to leave. It is a big safty rule.
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post #28 of 99 Old 08-16-2012, 09:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SlideStop View Post
Smrobs, I've been looking all over for an inexpensive one! They are just so darn expensive. It just makes more sense, especially because they are attached at the hip! Then they could also use take more riders at any events we have. Their original purpose was teaching driving lessons and to give "donkey rides" to. The woman who was driving them made it seem like you needed a PhD in rocket science to drive. A little common sense and lots of ground driving experience has taken me a LONG way.
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You have gotten some great common sense from several of the posters, please take it to heart and listen. They are experienced drivers and Taffy was spot on when she said that you will be immediately disqualified if you take a bridle off prior to taking the animal off of whatever your driving them with. Our driving club enforces this rule even at our pleasure driving days on estates here.

The above bolded comment I would like to comment on. I drive two 17.2H Percheron mares. While I know your very cute mule is not near as tall or heavy as my team is, please reconsider your mind set. Until you have had a oh sh*t accident or been on that accident, you have no fear. I have a very healthy fear of what could or may or will happen when I drive and am always paying attention, I am always watchful to things around me and I never take chances or do gigs that may put myself or my team in danger.

I also NEVER even considered doing public events where I had other people on my wagon till I had time and experience under my belt. About 9 and a half years of driving single and then almost a full year with a team, and that was with show experience as well. When you start giving rides to the general public, if ANYTHING should go wrong, someone gets hurt, falls down, your animal suddenly balks or backs up and someone gets even a scratch, I have seen people sue for little minor things. Driving is a dangerous sport, more so I personally think than riding because you not only have yourself and the animal to consider but also the cart or wagon and those on it. The accidents often times aren't minor.....

Please, just rethink what you feel, get a lot more experience under your belt and it isn't just a little common sense and lots of ground driving that will keep you safe. Also, consider getting a good insurance to cover you if you do do public driving events or have anyone in your vehicle. Were covered for quite a bit of money and we renew faithfully every year.

Last edited by GreySorrel; 08-16-2012 at 09:23 AM.
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post #29 of 99 Old 08-16-2012, 09:21 AM Thread Starter
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I was actually wondering about that. Originally I was tacking and bridleing then taking them outside, tying them with their halters on or over the neck and then hitching the cart. It got to be a lot of "stuff" they wiggled around to much with it over their neck and I felt bad for leaving the halters on while the bridle was over it. Also, the halters don't fit over the bridle. I also noticed that they fidget WAY more once their bridles go on. It's hard to find an extra hand to hold them so this has been my best solution. They tie like little rocks! I wouldnt do it if I thought they would struggle. Also they. Hitched and unhitched at that same pole everytime, which seems to relax them. And they also don't try to walk off. Also, less people seem to make them less fidgety.

I've just found this works for me... Any better ideas?
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post #30 of 99 Old 08-16-2012, 09:33 AM
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I have harnessed my mare Smoke, tied to the trailer, then hitched her myself, all with her bridle and harness on, talking the whole time so she knew where I was. Same thing when I got back, I tied her up then took the cart off, moved it out of the way, then took the bridle off, put her halter on, then went from there, I just did the opposite of what I began doing.

You can't get one person to head them while you hitch up?
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