How long do the horses run? - Page 2
   

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How long do the horses run?

This is a discussion on How long do the horses run? within the Endurance Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • How long would it take a horse to run 15 miles
  • How long do endurance rides last

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    07-15-2012, 03:33 PM
  #11
Weanling
Thanks Joe4D, how common are endurance races and competitive trail riding in Canada ?
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    07-15-2012, 08:07 PM
  #12
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d    
umm not quite, Under AERC rules, which sanctions actual "Endurance" An Endurance race is 50 mile or longer. LD's are 25-35 miles usually. They are also every bit a Race.
RACE : a contest of speed, as in running, riding, driving, or sailing.

You start at one point and RACE to another. He who comes in first with a horse fit to continue is the winner. The winner is based soley on time. As long as your horse isnt pulled by the vet. There are some other sports that have other scoring systems that arnt races, these are not properly refereed to as endurance, they are competitive trail. Courses are grueling and even finishing is an accomplishment. SOrta like a marathon. Many are entered for the challenge of just finishing, sorta like me. But they are still timed contests of speed.
There is a side event after the race. The top 10 finishers can stand for best conditioned. This is a formula that takes into account rider weight and condition of the horse at finnish as judged by the vets.

You generally need to maintain 6mph average to finish on time. 5mph will cut it to close on pulse down time. Winners may be doing 15 mph average. That's flat getting it over a 50 mile course.
Joe4d is technically correct. However, there is a little more to it. There are two types of riders: those that compete to win, and those that compete for miles. YOU have to decide what kind of rider you're going to be - more miles completed or more wins? These are rarely the same rider.

Here's how the "winners" are decided:
Placing: All riders are placed based upon the order they complete the race AND are deemed "fit to continue" and are therefore are awarded a "completion" and palced. If you are pulled (deemed not "fit to continue"), even if you "complete" the race, you are not awarded a "completion" and are therefore not placed or awarded. So yes, there is technically first place.
Best Condition: This is arguably the most coveted award. If you come in 1-10th place, you are allowed to "stand for Best Condition" - you are NOT automatically considered for this award. In addition to "completing", you have to complete a CRI (cardiac recovery index) within 10 minutes of finishing the race, then go clean up and come back an hour later for an additional CRI. Your vet scores, weight, and completion time are then put into a formula to determine the "Best Conditioned horse"
High Vet Score: You have to be in the top 10 and stand for best conditioned to receive this award. It is simply the horse with the overall highest scores from the vet. AERC does not give points for this award, however. It's still nice though.
Turtle: I'm not sure if this is a regional thing, but the rides around here all award Turtle for the last place rider within the time limit. I compete for this award - and it can get very competitive! I am building my collection of cute turtles I've gotten for this award

I personally think AERC endurance rides should be viewed like a marathon (FEI is very different) - there is technically a "winner", but many race to simply complete the race without regard to their placing. I LOVE competing for turtle because I stop and take lots of pictures and just enjoy the beautiful scenery I'm riding through AND, my horse gets to take it easier as well, so I don't really worry about getting pulled! However, you still have to keep a decent average pace, so I still do serious conditioning - I just got back from my last ride and got 2nd in the LD and Turtle in the 50 , so he's in good shape and capable of going faster, but that's just how I like to ride!
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    07-15-2012, 08:43 PM
  #13
Green Broke
Head here , Endurance Riding Online - AERC Calendars

Click on the links, all kinds of rides in Canada. I did my first LD last year, 25 miles in 4:23. Felt like it was over to quick and was kinda easy. Trained all winter for a 50 at Leatherwood mt, nearly killed both of us. I hurt for two days. Lady next to me in camp was 85 years old. Rode a friday and a saturday back to back 50's, and got up and made me coffee.
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    07-15-2012, 08:45 PM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splashstorm    
How is it tiring for the rider? And how long do these races take? All day?
In AERC, you are given 24 hours for a 100, 12 hours for a 50 and 6 hours for a 25. You can do the math to figure out the time allowed for other distances. That is total time, meaning the hold times are included in this number.

How much actual saddle times can depend on the race, the person doing the riding, and/or the trail conditions. Some people are riding to win, some people are riding to finish, and sometimes everyone riding is slowed down by terrain or weather conditions.


How tiring it is for the rider also depends on many factors, first and foremost being your own physical fitness. I can still remember my first conditioning ride (a whole 6 miles) and thinking I wasn't going to be able to get off the horse, forget walk the next day. Now I think my body has decided I am crazy/abusive and has given up being sore, even after 100s. Is it possible to overwork muscles to the point they can't even produce lactic acid anymore?
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    07-15-2012, 09:38 PM
  #15
Green Broke
Wow, phantom, not exactly instilling me with confidence. Only reason I hurt so bad at Leatherwood is I was determined to finish or die trying and ended up leading my horse 6 miles on foot on the last loop. But never had any issues riding distance on my gaited horse. I sure hope Emma is that special one in a million Walker. We shall see. Hope to have my hitch installed in my new truck and can start riding her get her in somewhat shape for an LD this winter.
     
    07-16-2012, 07:16 AM
  #16
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d    
Only reason I hurt so bad at Leatherwood is I was determined to finish or die trying and ended up leading my horse 6 miles on foot on the last loop. But never had any issues riding distance on my gaited horse.
Again, I think its all what your body is used to. Just because I can comfortably ride Dream 100 miles doesn't make me think I could do the same on someone else's horse.. gaited or otherwise, each horse moves in its own way.

I also don't think I could walk 6 miles without being sore (mountain terrain or otherwise). Doesn't mean I wouldn't do it if I felt I needed to, but sure wouldn't be surprised when I was sore for days afterwards.

Hell, I spent 3 hours swimming in heavy surf in the ocean yesterday -- something I haven't done in years -- and I am sure feeling it this morning!
     
    07-16-2012, 08:08 AM
  #17
Foal
Are gaited horses much easier to ride?
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    07-16-2012, 09:01 AM
  #18
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splashstorm    
Are gaited horses much easier to ride?
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Yes, if they are calm and well behaved. Their gait is like sitting on air.
They can be a bit high strung though.
     
    07-16-2012, 10:50 AM
  #19
Started
My first 25 mile ctr just about killed me. Now 25 miles is no problem. We do fun rides around the farm that are 15 miles in about 1.5 hours, but we are really moving and the horses are in great shape.

There used to be a couple that rode walkers and they did well.

The guy that beat everyone out was a man in his 70's, riding a polish arabian with a trot like a jackhammer and a huge lope. He always came back complaining about how sore his butt was, but he always won

Then there was a lady on a 30 year old qh, she did novice 25 mile ctr and loved it.

There was a legaly blind cowboy at one ride on a mustang. His horse followed the flags because he couldnt see them. I beleive he placed too...
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    07-16-2012, 12:28 PM
  #20
Green Broke
Gaited horses don't trot, so no posting. You sit in the saddle and ride level. I have not found gaited horses to be high strung. If anything they are pretty mellow. Almost every behavior issue, or incidence of "high strung" I have seen is a direct result of rider error.
People put quarter horse or long square skirt saddles on them, then wonder why they are butt heads. People constantly stay in their mouth or jerk on them and try to force them to walk at a QH pace. Which tends to get them wound up.

My horse Bo has permanent scar tissue knobs at his hip from a square skirt saddle. When I get him he would roll his eyes in the back of his head and rear if you even came close to him with a saddle. Trainer thought I was nuts to get on him. Id throw my short Aussi made for him saddle on him, and it was like someone flipping a switch hed exhale and relax.

Let them move out a bit and use a saddle that fits them and Walkers tend to be pretty good horses.
     

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