How long do the horses run? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

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post #21 of 29 Old 07-16-2012, 12:36 PM
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Joe, I suspect you are right. I see a lot of walkers in saddles that can't possibly fit them and people using rough hands on them. They are probably actually pretty tolerant to not just plain kill their riders.

I rode a nice little walking horse when I was in my late teens and early twenties. She was very easy to handle. She was so smooth that you could sip ice tea while she was gaiting wide open.

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post #22 of 29 Old 07-16-2012, 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Splashstorm View Post
Are gaited horses much easier to ride?
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Usually, yes! A well gaited horse is smooth as sugar, and many of them have amazing canters. *drool*

They are very calm, easy, willing horses with huge hearts. Combined with the smooth gaits, they are very easy to ride!

There are exceptions. My mare is neither smooth nor calm. She's a hot head that paces faster than most horses canter and can trot like a Standardbred. She didn't skip the heart or the willingness though.

A lot of people will try to ride a gaited like a "normal horse" and find it doesn't work. They need properly fitting saddles (especially to gait well) and a person who understands they are NOT just a smoother version of a quarter horse. These horses are so tolerant that they won't complain loudly (think of those poor TWHs being dragged around in those crazy bits... Poor, sweet souls), but they deserve to be comfortable and happy.

Last edited by Brighteyes; 07-16-2012 at 03:31 PM.
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post #23 of 29 Old 07-16-2012, 05:19 PM
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alot of older riders and especially riders with knee problems gravitate towards walkers. Id never would have gained the confidence to canter if it wasnt for my walker. I couldnt ever get past the trot stage. Figured if the trot was that god awful the canter must be worse.
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post #24 of 29 Old 07-16-2012, 06:50 PM
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Ha I'm only 19 and cringe when I have to get on a non-gaited horse! When I sold my mares foal the new owner just looked at me and said "you are way to young to be riding a gaited horse!" I calmly informed her that comfortable riding doesn't depend on the age :)

Joe how old is your walker? I am wary of competing in a LD with my girl only being barely 4. Should I wait until she is a bit older and more mature bodily to start competing with her?
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post #25 of 29 Old 07-16-2012, 08:04 PM
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I am wary of competing in a LD with my girl only being barely 4. Should I wait until she is a bit older and more mature bodily to start competing with her?
Four is not even close to totally physically mature yet, regardless of breed.

While its a great time to be getting the riding foundation on them, I personally wouldn't be looking to put a 4yo of mine into an LD.


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post #26 of 29 Old 07-16-2012, 08:07 PM
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I'd have to look up the rules but I think 4 is the cuttoff for an LD. Even so Id give her another year of conditioning. Not just heart and lungs but joints and connecting tissues need to strengthen. Pic an easy terrain cool day. Looking back at the 5 rides I have done, Bo did fine on the cool, 70 and below rides. Even on the rough terrain. Emma is bigger stronger and faster so who knows maybe she will work out.
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post #27 of 29 Old 07-16-2012, 08:11 PM
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Okie dokie :) thank you! We will stick to relaxing fox trotting to build muscle then. Do you supplement your horses at all for joint health? I know for a fact that Hunny has a locking stifle, and while it is much better now it worries me for her future health.

You have to learn how to fall before you can learn how to ride~
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post #28 of 29 Old 07-16-2012, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Joe4d View Post
Looking back at the 5 rides I have done, Bo did fine on the cool, 70 and below rides.
He needs "walker weather." Are you going to come up to Jersey in the fall? Sounds like it would be perfect for Bo, with cool temperatures and non-mountain terrain.
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post #29 of 29 Old 07-16-2012, 09:27 PM
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I also think you should give him another chance Joe.

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