Spooky horse - The Horse Forum

 6Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 27 Old 03-04-2013, 09:23 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Aurora, Texas
Posts: 360
• Horses: 1
Spooky horse

I finally got to go on my birthday ride yesterday, and my horse did good for about eight miles ( he's only four and I'm working on his conditioning), and I got him to let me tail him up a steep hill. So I was happy as heck and everything was going good. We passed through some woods and both my horse and my dad's horse poncho spooked. Poncho only jumped, but my little idiot decided to bolt. I went over his back end, landed on my hip and then some how twisted my left arm, pulling the muscles in my chest. It hurts to breathe of do anything. But anyways, we still don't know why they spooked, there was no rustle of branches, no out of the ordinary noises and it was so sudden I had no warning at all.
So after that long rambling story, how do you guys stay on when something like that happens? Does working out and building muscle help or working with the horse even more? Because this is the second time in six months he's done this and I can't afford to keep getting hurt like this, my job is very physical and right now it hurts to breathe and to move. I had to roll out of bed onto the floor because I couldn't use certain muscles. So I'm asking for y'all's opinions/help, cause you haven't failed me before.
Posted via Mobile Device
Faustinblack is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 27 Old 03-04-2013, 10:39 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 2,953
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Does working out and building muscle help or working with the horse even more?
bingo on both counts.

1- you need to work on getting in better shape, which helps alot when it comes to sticking with a horse. Being strong and flexible are keys to successfully riding green horses. Try yoga.

2-work with him on the ground, teaching him that when he's scared he should look first, and trust you. Undersaddle teach him a one rein stop, when you feel him start to spook, pull his head around. We use this alot on the spooky, athletic OTTB's, and it works very well.
Corporal likes this.
BlueSpark is offline  
post #3 of 27 Old 03-04-2013, 11:38 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Aurora, Texas
Posts: 360
• Horses: 1
Alrighty. Thank you :) gives me something to work on when I can, you know, move again
Posted via Mobile Device
Faustinblack is offline  
post #4 of 27 Old 03-04-2013, 11:39 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: NW Oregon
Posts: 2,244
• Horses: 0
What kind of a saddle were you using? If your weren't using a western it might be an idea to give you a more secure seat until your guy gets more miles. I know you will get lots of good training advice but my experience is that it's easier to fly off a flatter saddle than a western with a good cantle.

If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, it's because your tactics suck. ~ Marine 1SGT J. Reifinger
Dustbunny is offline  
post #5 of 27 Old 03-04-2013, 11:41 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Aurora, Texas
Posts: 360
• Horses: 1
I was using an abetta arabian endurance saddle. I used to use an aussie but it wouldn't fit the new horse. That kinda contributed to getting tossed. With the aussie I could hang on with my legs more easily. With this new saddle it's a bit more difficult.
Posted via Mobile Device
Faustinblack is offline  
post #6 of 27 Old 03-04-2013, 11:43 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: East Central Illinois
Posts: 7,109
• Horses: 3
Clinton Anderson's "lunging for respect" is one of the best ways, IMHO, to desensitise your horse. Teach him this, and whenever he spooks at ANYTHING, show him that he will have to work, lunging left, then the yield, lunging right, then the yield, repeat, repeat, repeat.
Use a lunge whip with the lash tied to the stick and secure a plastic grocery bag to the end. Plastic bags eat more horses that you would know every year. LOL (Ask your horse about this--he KNOWS!!!)
Seriously, it's the thing that moves just outside of his vision that frightens him the most, and that's why he bolted.
Also, I would work this horse in an enclose area for the next few months. You are damX lucky that you didn't get knocked off under a limb!! You could have been paralized or dead.

A Jack and Three Queens, the latest book by James C. Dedman, Amazon.com
Hope that you fall in love with "Trot", like I did! http://www.horseforum.com/general-of...queens-617793/
Corporal is offline  
post #7 of 27 Old 03-04-2013, 11:46 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Aurora, Texas
Posts: 360
• Horses: 1
The weird thing is, Bleu, my horse is not afraid of chainsaws, tarps, plastic bags, or anything like that. I've tied tarps at him. Made him drag one ties to his foot. He just seems to be afraid of bushes rattling, leaves rustling and freaking dogs.
Posted via Mobile Device
Faustinblack is offline  
post #8 of 27 Old 03-04-2013, 12:22 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ontario
Posts: 17,193
• Horses: 0
Because a horse's hearing and sense of smell make up for his lousy eyesight, whatever bothered them could be 1/4 mi away or more. Since neither detected any movement, then it wasn't close.
Corporal and LisaG like this.
Saddlebag is offline  
post #9 of 27 Old 03-04-2013, 01:11 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 727
• Horses: 1
I've ridden in the abetta endurance and honestly, I don't love the seat either! It's awful slippery, too. Something a little deeper (like a barrel saddle, or an aussie) might help! I have a barrel saddle with a suede seat/fenders, and while I hate that the suede gets stained by jeans easily, I stick like glue and the high cantle keeps me there.

Riding out a bolt is difficult, so it's important to do everything you can to prepare for one-- even if your horse seems like a quiet, safe ride. In the arena, practice making your horse soft to one-rein stops (allowing you to take away his head) and also practice feeling what it's like when he tenses up. Always pay attention to his ears, his head, and his muscle tone so that you can sense when he is preparing for a spook. When he does, knowing the one-rein stop and having a horse who responds softly to it gives you one defense against that spook-- you feel him tense up and you bring his head around before he can respond.

Other than that, just practice sitting deep. My horse tended to have spooky days before I established to him that I was a trustworthy leader, and so I trained myself to respond to every spook with a deepening of my seat.

You ought to see a doctor for your chest. :( You might need some kind of brace or support until you are 100% again.
existentialpony is offline  
post #10 of 27 Old 03-04-2013, 02:42 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Aurora, Texas
Posts: 360
• Horses: 1
My mom has been a nurse for twenty years. She has me on something for the pain and a muscle relaxer and she already checked to make sure nothing was broken. So I just have to wait it out. Thanks for the concern though. And I used to barrel race, and I still have the barrel saddle. I hate the bloody thing though.
Posted via Mobile Device
Faustinblack is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
spooky horse lizzy12312 Horse Training 5 02-21-2012 08:13 PM
Spooky horse Five Furlongs Horse Training 7 01-23-2011 05:04 PM
Spooky Horse KTGBean Horse Training 3 10-14-2008 11:11 AM
Horse very spooky sup3rn0th1ng Horse Training 16 05-26-2008 03:20 PM
Spooky Horse HAL Horse Training 18 01-30-2008 12:17 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome