Am I an intermediate level rider yet?! - Page 3
 
 

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Am I an intermediate level rider yet?!

This is a discussion on Am I an intermediate level rider yet?! within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Confident intermediate rider meaning
  • What is advanced intermediate level in a riding club

 
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    06-11-2011, 11:18 AM
  #21
Foal
I wish I could ask my instructor but I have not been able see her for the past three weeks because of conflicts with school and she has clinics to go to. So you people are all I've got : ) Thanks for the impute(sp?) everyone! (I guess based on tinyliny's scale I'm a lower intermediate)
     
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    06-11-2011, 04:42 PM
  #22
Weanling
Lol, what annoys me is not labeling the riders, but the horses. An intermediate level horse could pretty much mean anything... going horse shopping is very confusing at times. While I hate labeling people, I think its important to know where you stand when looking for a horse, so that you don't go see a "nice, intermediate level horse" that is actually only ridable by a trainer. Stuff like that is just dangerous. As long as your not in the market for a horse, don't worry about it. But if you are, always err on the side of caution. Have fun riding!
     
    06-20-2011, 11:14 AM
  #23
Trained
I walk, trot, canter and gallop with a balanced, quiet seat, and I know how to ask leg yield and shoulder-in at walk and trot. My sitting trot needs some work but it's pretty good all round. I walk/trot/canter bareback. I'm not the prettiest rider in the world but I'm fairly effective.

My current horse is a schoolmaster but he's not one of those pushbutton riding school ponies, he is very sensitive and if you don't ask right, he won't respond.

I jump up to 3' confidently (though I haven't in a while due to saddle issues meaning I can only ride in my dressage saddle) and I've jumped a C grade cross country jump (think 2'10" high and about 3'4" wide, and solid, therefore scary), in my dressage saddle, without catching him in the mouth. He rushes if you catch him in the mouth. He is an ex-B grade eventer, not sure of heights for that, and he was bought with the intention of him showing me the ropes in preparation for the next horse, which was either going to be young, talented and already going kindly, or unstarted. I ended up going with unstarted, though I'll probably have her professionally started when the time comes.

I don't cope well with bolting or out of control type behaviour but I have trained a pony, he was a problem bucker and wouldn't go on the left canter lead when we got him (and would NOT jump), and if you tried to force him to left-canter, he would buck - and when we sold him, he was jumping up to 3', picking up both leads without fail, and competing and placing in jumping. He also would do a fairly consistent leg yield/shoulder in at walk and trot. I trained this, and I probably trained it wrong, but he would do it.

Due to my lack of confidence while out (usually at riding club, though general lack of confidence out is a factor too) I consider myself to be only an intermediate level rider. When I'm on top of that lack of confidence while out, I will be at least one level higher, perhaps more.

I have bought a weanling filly with the support of my (very horsey) parents, the logic being that in 3 years' time when she gets started to saddle, I'll have a lot more experience and confidence, and I'll be able to teach her what she needs to know. If I'm not experienced enough to start her myself, I'll have a professional do it for me. I have experience with very very green-broke horses (my old horse had been broken in for 7 weeks when I bought him, and it didn't go all that well, but we managed to turn it around eventually; won't be making the same mistakes with my filly) and I have a good network of extremely experienced people (experts even - one is a riding coach who has trained horses and riders to state winning level from absolute green) who have promised to help if I need it.

I am an intermediate level rider because of my knowledge and confidence, not my seat and ability. I was told by an instructor at riding club that I was a very quiet rider with great hands. My regular coach says I need to trust my horse more, which is hard for me, because I came off (from him) at a gallop about a month ago and fractured my humerus (hairline), got a bad concussion, and couldn't work for a week, or ride for two. My confidence is my main barrier now.

A year ago, I was little more than a beginner, so you'd be amazed how fast you can progress with the right horse!
     
    06-20-2011, 08:25 PM
  #24
Foal
If you ride English maybe you could look at the pony club levels the levels go from D to A levels and d is beginner a is advanced and each has a checklist of specific skills. I always enjoyed goin by those. I always thought an intermediate rider should be able to adapt to different situations have an established seat and be able to help other riders with basic skills there are so many aspects of riding that you probably are an intermediate rider but there is always so much to learn. What people have said it totally right. There are times when we hit a wall with our progress. I always felt everyone was so much ether but as my riding has progressed I've seen people who used to ride well have dropped out of the sport and now I'm the only 15yr old whose riding at my level In my town. So keep at it and I think it's important to get more horse time in because when I take propper lessons only once a week I'm soar for two days after and progress seems really slow. But you don't need to pay for two lessons be a barn bum get connections talk to horse people and your bound to find other ways to ride and no matter what you'll learn things just from talking to people. Work at the barn or find horses that need exercise or grooming anything you can get ur hands on. It's worked for me:) good luck you sound like ur making progress just never give up!
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    06-22-2011, 06:08 PM
  #25
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hlover    
If you ride English maybe you could look at the pony club levels the levels go from D to A levels and d is beginner a is advanced and each has a checklist of specific skills. I always enjoyed goin by those. I always thought an intermediate rider should be able to adapt to different situations have an established seat and be able to help other riders with basic skills there are so many aspects of riding that you probably are an intermediate rider but there is always so much to learn. What people have said it totally right. There are times when we hit a wall with our progress. I always felt everyone was so much ether but as my riding has progressed I've seen people who used to ride well have dropped out of the sport and now I'm the only 15yr old whose riding at my level In my town. So keep at it and I think it's important to get more horse time in because when I take propper lessons only once a week I'm soar for two days after and progress seems really slow. But you don't need to pay for two lessons be a barn bum get connections talk to horse people and your bound to find other ways to ride and no matter what you'll learn things just from talking to people. Work at the barn or find horses that need exercise or grooming anything you can get ur hands on. It's worked for me:) good luck you sound like ur making progress just never give up!
Posted via Mobile Device
Thank you! I never thought of looking up the pony club levels but that's a great idea. I'll go check it out! And when it comes to being sore, trust me, we are totally in the same boat.
     
    06-27-2011, 11:31 AM
  #26
Trained
I don't have any formal pony club levels -hides-

I am, however, in the second-from-highest group for the group lessons, and my coach keeps telling me to forget about riding 'pretty' (as a reference point, I took lessons with the same coach about 2 1/2 years ago and he was ALWAYS telling me off about something to do with my position).

I think the moment you really become an 'intermediate' level rider is when you start to be able to really engage your core, and start to feel how off-balance you REALLY are. You feel like you're going backwards for a while, and then the improvement takes the bit in its mouth and gallops away with you! Your confidence soars and your results (if you show) improve dramatically. Your horse is responding better, that one little niggly thing that's been driving you nuts that you always thought was your horse vanishes when your coach tells you "just put a little bit more weight in your inside stirrup" and you do as s/he says. You learn the feel to know the difference between a lazy trot and a really good working trot, and the difference between a good extended/lengthen trot and a rushy flat 'fast' trot - the difference between 'fast' and 'forward' comes to you as well. You might know the difference between the LOOK, but until you know the difference between the FEELING, you'll never get the right results from your horse.

Intermediate is the place between your coach telling you 'better' and your coach telling you 'NOW you're ready to help train that OTTB, with my guidance'. Intermediate is the place where your coach stops saying 'better' and starts saying 'GOOD'. That's if you have MY coach, who is amazing, and who is very tough on his students. If you have the big softie next door, "amazing" might mean "wow, you can canter without falling off, well done!", and if you have the mean lady with the stick who will literally smack you if you so much as waver half a step of the centre line, "ok" might mean "you amazing rider, that was PERFECT, can't fault your piaffe/canter pirouette/insert other extremely advanced dressage movement, and I feel threatened now so I won't tell you how great you really are"
     
    07-04-2011, 06:40 PM
  #27
Foal
Well in comparison to let's say an Olympian, you'd still be a beginner -as would I, and the majority of this forum. Whereas let's say in a simple lesson barn, walk/trot/canter and over fence work is considered advanced. It all depends who exactly you're asking

I walk/trot/canter, flying changes, school over 3'6" to 4' fences, show 3'3" - 3'6", some basic lateral work, etc. I'm no top level dressage rider, but I never considered myself a "beginner" per say

I took a Danny Foster clinic last spring and he told me I was a beginner because I used the wall. He said beginner riders ride on the wall, intermediate riders can keep a horse straight and forward without putting around on the same track. He made us ride at least 4 ft away from the outside wall and I'll admit, both my horse and I were having difficulty from so many years of tracking on the wall. It's lessons like that which really make you take a step back and realize all the different opinions on 'rider level'
     

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beginner rider, intermediate rider, lessons, schooling, teen

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