canter transition (sitting trot) help!
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding

canter transition (sitting trot) help!

This is a discussion on canter transition (sitting trot) help! within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Sitting or rising trot to canter
  • Transition aids for canter to trot

Like Tree6Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    08-31-2011, 02:06 PM
  #1
Foal
canter transition (sitting trot) help!

I'm struggling to go into canter because I find it hard to get my legs into the right position and give the horse a small kick and to keep my balance. I told the instructor I had in my last lesson ( who isn't my usual instructor though) I found it hard to kick in sitting trot, and she told me that I need to grip with my knees and thighs and use my lower leg seperately to give a kick. Then she told me to go into a sitting trot to see what it was like and she said it was fine so then we started to do cantering again. When I sit the trot when I'm not going to go into canter, sometimes it feels really good and I am going with the rhythm, but other times I am bouncing all over the place, and when she was watching me do the stitting trot I was doing it well. But everytime I go into canter the sitting trot is so bouncy and I feel so unbalanced and when the horse makes the transition I lurch forward and it takes me a while to get into the rhythm it. If my usual instructor is teaching me next lesson I will talk to her then, but I was wandering if anyone has any advice. Also, I thought your not supposed to grip with your knees, but that it what I'm taught.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    08-31-2011, 03:48 PM
  #2
Weanling
First of all you don't ask a horse to canter from sitting trot. I've also never heard of kicking being a cue for canter.
     
    08-31-2011, 03:59 PM
  #3
Yearling
You can ask a horse to canter from a sitting trot, dressage riders do it all the time..

No a kick should not be needed for a canter cue... have you tried asking for a canter from 2-pt until you get a more solid leg or from a walk?

You should not be gripping with your knees.

Also when you ask for the canter try to sit weight in your outside seatbone, this will help keep your balance and the horses balance when they pick up the canter.

If you must do a sitting trot to ask for canter, try to sit for only a couple strides and then ask, make sure your back is loose and you're using your core to absorb the shock and stretch your weight into your heels, this will help with balance
     
    08-31-2011, 04:02 PM
  #4
Weanling
I would disagree with the instructor that you should be gripping with your knee and thigh for any purpose, but certainly not if you are attempting to successfully sit the trot! That will only cause you to lose connection with the saddle and will effectively shut down your ability to open your hip to follow the horse's motion.

As for the canter transition, you do not need to sit for any prolonged period of time before cuing for the canter. I typically post until I have my horse properly set up to cue for the canter (meaning I have her on the bit, bending, and have control over her shoulder), then sit a beat or two before cuing. To be quite honest, I'm not even really certain how many strides, because I do not think of it as "post the trot, then do sitting trot, then cue for the canter." If I had to guess, based purely on what you've written here and not knowing anything about you as a rider, I would guess that you are tensing up and overthinking the canter depart, and that's where you're running into problems. Would your instructor be willing to put you on the lunge line so that you could get the feel of the trot-canter transition without having to worry about doing the cuing yourself.
     
    08-31-2011, 05:09 PM
  #5
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by vergo97    
I'm struggling to go into canter because I find it hard to get my legs into the right position and give the horse a small kick and to keep my balance. I told the instructor I had in my last lesson ( who isn't my usual instructor though) I found it hard to kick in sitting trot, and she told me that I need to grip with my knees and thighs and use my lower leg seperately to give a kick. Then she told me to go into a sitting trot to see what it was like and she said it was fine so then we started to do cantering again. When I sit the trot when I'm not going to go into canter, sometimes it feels really good and I am going with the rhythm, but other times I am bouncing all over the place, and when she was watching me do the stitting trot I was doing it well. But everytime I go into canter the sitting trot is so bouncy and I feel so unbalanced and when the horse makes the transition I lurch forward and it takes me a while to get into the rhythm it. If my usual instructor is teaching me next lesson I will talk to her then, but I was wandering if anyone has any advice. Also, I thought your not supposed to grip with your knees, but that it what I'm taught.

This subject was covered in this thread.

Applying aids from walk to trot to canter.
     
    08-31-2011, 05:31 PM
  #6
Foal
Can you do rising trot into canter? I have always been taught (from the two different stables I have been too) to do sitting trot before going into canter. At my old stables I was taught just to kick when in sitting trot to get a canter, and only last lesson at my new stables I was taught to move my outside leg to behind the girth when asking. When you say that a kick should not be needed to start a canter, do you mean that I should only give a squeeze?

I'm not very good at two-point, at my old stables I did it for about two lessons in the trot and when jumping (but I was jumping way to early there). My instructor mentioned about two weeks ago that once my canter is better, I will move up to a group lesson and start doing jumping, so I will probably be learning two-point better in a few weeks/months time. I have never started a canter from a walk before, wouldn't the horse just go into trot if you gave them a squeeze/kick at the walk, and then you would be in the same situation?

The "grip with the knee" is really confusing me, at my old stables I was told all the time not to grip with my knee, but at the new stables I have always been taught that I should. They say that that is the only way to stay on, and I can't really tell them that they are wrong. I don't really grip with my knees any way, last lesson I started to use my lower leg to grip a lot, and that really helped. I have been scared that gripping with my lower leg would make the horse go faster, but it didn't.

I think I am only supposed to be sitting a few strides as I go into canter on a corner, and start to sit the trot just before the corner and am suposed to be in canter once I am round the corner, but I end up not sitting the trot properly or accidently rising, and then going into canter after the corner, taking me by suprise, and I end up lurching forward.

FoxyRoxy1507 - thanks for the tips for going into canter.

DraftXDressage - I think I am tensing up, because I am trying to think about so many different things and i'm trying to keep my balance. I haden't thought about the lunge line, I have never been on one and I don't even know if the stables does lunge people.
     
    08-31-2011, 05:33 PM
  #7
Foal
Thanks spyder, I will have a look at that page!
     
    08-31-2011, 05:54 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mumiinek    
First of all you don't ask a horse to canter from sitting trot. I've also never heard of kicking being a cue for canter.
Wait, what? I guess have to apologise here as it seems my little brains confused a few things here. For some paranormal reason I mistook the term "sitting trot" for "posting trot". What I meant was "you don't ask a horse to canter from a posting trot", which of course has no relevance to your original post since you never mentioned trying to make the horse canter while posting. So yeah... I apologise


Also beware of the "outside leg behind the girth" but you'll learn everything in Spyder's article.
     
    08-31-2011, 08:38 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by vergo97    
At my old stables I was taught just to kick when in sitting trot to get a canter, and only last lesson at my new stables I was taught to move my outside leg to behind the girth when asking. When you say that a kick should not be needed to start a canter, do you mean that I should only give a squeeze?

Ideally, yes. You should only need to slide your outside leg back and give a squeeze to cue for the canter. That being said, I have ridden a few sour lesson horses in my day, and sometimes a louder aid is required. But on a well trained horse, sliding that leg back and giving a light squeeze should do it.

I have never started a canter from a walk before, wouldn't the horse just go into trot if you gave them a squeeze/kick at the walk, and then you would be in the same situation?

Again, this all goes back to how well trained the horse is, and how clear your aids are. When I ask my horse to move into the trot from a walk, she gets a squeeze from both legs, with more emphasis on the inside leg so as to ensure that she maintains the proper bend in the transition. When cuing for a walk-canter transition (though I rarely do this with her yet because it is more challenging and she's not quite ready), I would again slide my outside leg back and give a squeeze. I think Spyder's thread really help give you a good way to think about the way we apply aids for different gaits.

...but at the new stables I have always been taught that I should. They say that that is the only way to stay on...

Without watching a lesson myself, I hesitate to make assumptions about the quality of instruction, but the above statement makes me very, very concerned with what you're learning there. Gripping with your knee will not allow you to have a solid seat, nor will it allow you to have a stable lower leg. If you hope to advance to jumping at some point, gripping with your knee can and will become a huge safety concern. If you are told that again, I would ask them to clarify what they mean -- hopefully the instructor didn't actually mean pinch your knee into the saddle and was instead just explaining herself poorly.
My thoughts in purple.
     
    09-01-2011, 05:23 AM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by DraftXDressage    
You should only need to slide your outside leg back and give a squeeze to cue for the canter.
Outside leg behind the girth is not a cue for canter (if we're not talking about backyard cues). Please, read Spyder's article too or go read other threads dedicated to this topic, you'll learn that although some people still (sadly) do this, it is nowhere near correct.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Suggestions for a better canter transition? coffeeaddict Horse Training 8 05-01-2011 09:28 AM
fix a chair seat in a sitting trot and canter Goodbye13lueSky Horse Riding 15 02-24-2011 08:21 AM
Gets speedy during canter transition work Tymer Horse Riding 4 01-10-2011 08:14 PM
Trot to Walk transition kitten_Val Dressage 13 12-22-2010 10:37 PM
Canter Transition Troubles Equina Horse Training 4 10-25-2008 12:07 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0