Cantering and Lead Changess
 
 

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Cantering and Lead Changess

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  • Cantering and lead

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  • 3 Post By Spyder

 
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    11-05-2011, 10:45 PM
  #1
Yearling
Cantering and Lead Changess

So my pony's always been pretty automatic with her leads, and she usually does her changes all in one easy movement - you don't feel anything big, it's all in one easy smooth stride. But, lately I've been doing lots and lots of transition work and simple changes.. Mostly in four loop serpentines and such. But since I've been doing that, I've noticed she jumps into the change instead of doing it almost seemlessly, it's very obvious. Does that make sense? Lol And when I ask for the canter departure, it's the same jumping motion.

If she 'jumps' (not really a jump.. idk what else to call it) for the change, does that mean she's not as balanced as she was before, or what?
     
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    11-05-2011, 11:31 PM
  #2
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveTheSaddlebreds    
So my pony's always been pretty automatic with her leads, and she usually does her changes all in one easy movement - you don't feel anything big, it's all in one easy smooth stride. But, lately I've been doing lots and lots of transition work and simple changes.. Mostly in four loop serpentines and such. But since I've been doing that, I've noticed she jumps into the change instead of doing it almost seemlessly, it's very obvious. Does that make sense? Lol And when I ask for the canter departure, it's the same jumping motion.

If she 'jumps' (not really a jump.. idk what else to call it) for the change, does that mean she's not as balanced as she was before, or what?
Probably doing it more engaged.
upnover, Kayty and Allison Finch like this.
     
    11-06-2011, 12:41 AM
  #3
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder    
Probably doing it more engaged.
I've noticed she's become a lot more collected and 'springy' when I do a lot of the transition work.

So it's a good thing? I'll try and get a video if I can..
     
    11-06-2011, 04:44 AM
  #4
Trained
Yes, in dressage, we want more jump in the canter and through the change rather than just a flat, smooth change.
More jump = a good thing!
     
    11-06-2011, 07:17 AM
  #5
Super Moderator
When horses are heavy on the forehand, they tend to "pull" themselves into the canter with their front end. Often, you will see a horses head fly up in the transition as being a sign of this happening. When a horse developes more engagement, they are able to push forward from the haunch, giving you that "leaping" feel. It often signifys a more engaged depart.

I would love to see videos.
     
    11-06-2011, 07:57 AM
  #6
Yearling
When I go out today, I'll see what I can do about a video... I'd like to know that she's using her body more effectively.
     

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