changing horses
 
 

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changing horses

This is a discussion on changing horses within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        08-30-2012, 09:04 PM
      #1
    Weanling
    changing horses

    Would you put a beginner rider who trots on the lunge line on an advance horse?

    Theres this fairly new girl at the barn who was riding this horse(who is leaving on sunday for his new home) for her lesson. It seems like she's a beginner rider b/c she only trots on he lunge line and rides at the top third of the arena.

    So she came up to the barn to hang out with the the other girls in the barn. The trainer comes up to check on her and says *since the horse is leaving on sunday..im going to put you on this other horse* (im not going to give names out)..but this grey horse is pretty advance to ride. So I don't get why the trainer would let her ride him. The horse does jumpers and moves pretty quick. So I don't know if this beginner rider can handle him.

    There are other beginner horses at our barn that she can ride. So why not ride one of them. :P
         
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        08-30-2012, 09:19 PM
      #2
    Yearling
    Not 100% sure I comprehend completely, but if it is what I think it is, here ya go :p

    I don't think, for being only into lunge work, you have to worry about it. If the horse does Jumpers, I'm willing to bet he's broke to death on a lunge line. Too many people are too chicken to get on their horse before they lunge them, when the real problem lies with how you train the horse...
    Anyway, I really don't think it should be a big deal for now :) When she starts using the whole ring, specifically cantering, she will need a sturdy mount.
         
        08-30-2012, 09:28 PM
      #3
    Foal
    Personally I would not put such a novice rider on the grey horse. Even if that horse was able to be effectively controlled on a lunge line, in my opinion it is better to put the beginner rider on a horse that she is able to grow on and will one day be able to ride off the lunge line as well. That way once she is ready to advance to trotting on her own she is on a safe, secure pony that she already has experience on and will take good care of her.

    However, her trainer may have very realistic and well justified reasons for putting her on this horse. Maybe he/she thinks this girl will be able to handle him. Maybe the trainer is just planning on trying her on this horse to see if their a good match. Maybe it's only temporary until she gets moved off the lunge line or finds a more suitable match. There is too little information to draw a conclusion. And either way, it is still up to the trainer to decide. I'm sure this trainer would not put her on a horse that will put her in a dangerous situation.
         
        09-05-2012, 05:56 PM
      #4
    Green Broke
    I think its good to put beginner riders on advanced horses.

    Do you ever go to a riding school (not all) and notice how all the beginner horses are completely dead to leg and rein commands? That's because all the beginner riders kick and pull, because that's all the horses will respond to. That means these riders are being trained to kick and have heavy hands.

    Put them on an advanced horse and they can learn subtle aids. They can learn what collection feels like. They can learn more advanced movements and begin to understand the subtleties of what is being taught.

    This horse might be a bit of a handful, but if it wasn't calm and safe in an arena I seriously doubt an instructor would put someone on it. It would be a very stupid move.
         
        09-05-2012, 06:21 PM
      #5
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saskia    
    I think its good to put beginner riders on advanced horses.

    Do you ever go to a riding school (not all) and notice how all the beginner horses are completely dead to leg and rein commands? That's because all the beginner riders kick and pull, because that's all the horses will respond to. That means these riders are being trained to kick and have heavy hands.

    Put them on an advanced horse and they can learn subtle aids. They can learn what collection feels like. They can learn more advanced movements and begin to understand the subtleties of what is being taught.

    This horse might be a bit of a handful, but if it wasn't calm and safe in an arena I seriously doubt an instructor would put someone on it. It would be a very stupid move.
    I'd just like to point out, most of the time the reason why beginner horses are so dead to leg and rein is because of the beginner riders. When they are just learning to ride, they don't understand what the heck subtlety is. They don't know how it feels and they don't know how to use subtle aids. And they aren't going to learn it in the snap of your fingers, because most importantly they can't use subtle aids. It takes balance and muscle memory to do that, and when a beginner starts out they don't have either. Nope, when a beginner rider starts out they are going to be all over the place and just plain messy. Those subtle aids will just confuse the horse.

    So in the mean time until they learn muscle memory and balance and gain experience, they are usually put on a beginner horse. Most beginner horses are quiet, safe, and yes, a little dead to leg and rein. That's simply because they are used to beginner riders pulling and kicking and doing god knows what on their backs. No matter what, no matter how great an instructor this beginner has, it's inevitable that they will make a million mistakes while learning to ride. The horse has to be forgiving and put up with that. But if you put a beginner rider on an advanced horse, think of how potentially dangerous that would be. Advanced horses are advanced for a reason: because beginners don't have the experience, muscle memory, or balance to ride them effectively. Often they will respond to the slightest of cues, and just think of how many mixed signals the beginner will be giving.

    Remember, time is the greatest teacher.
         
        09-06-2012, 06:32 PM
      #6
    Started
    While I agree that he MIGHT be too much, it's not your choice to put her on this horse. Her instructor probably feels she needs to learn how to ride on a more difficult horse. I don't mean to insult you in any way though. I don't know how she rides however, so I can't make a well thought out response since there are quite a few variables here. It also seems that you don't know how she rides very well either. Maybe she is a good rider, although inexperienced, but is on the lunge line to improve her riding and balance.
         

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