critique my riding please :)
 
 

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critique my riding please :)

This is a discussion on critique my riding please :) within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • My horse throws head up and hollows out after jump

 
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    01-12-2011, 12:27 PM
  #1
Foal
critique my riding please :)

I would like feedback ony my riding please :) need to find out what I need to improve and what I might be doing wrong etc, so it would be great if people could do that! I have a few videos that I've attached to this, thanks! not sure if I attached them on right though so if they don't appear then please tell me :/

Oh, and don't pay attention to the conversation we are having on the video, its rather random!

     
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    01-12-2011, 05:43 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
I watched the two videos. Here's my impression:

In video one I see a tense horse and a rider that isn't helping that tension at all. I wish I saw the rider work to getting the horse more relaxed by encouraging it to stretch down, working in some smaller circles and off the rail and riding lighter.

You tend to have a position with your legs out front that ends up with you kind of "waterskiing" on the reins. Elbows out, arms strait and very fixed. The horse moves in a defensive manner as if it expects to be bopped in the mouth. During the canter you were so stiff in your lower body that you were bumping on her back rather than moving with her. I know it's hard with a horse that hollows out its' back like she does. But that's all part of her being unrelaxed and defensive to her mouth.
Try doing some riding one handed. Hold reins in one hand like a cowboy and really bring your elbow in to your core and don't let yourself pull yourself up on the reins at all. Work on getting your feet back under you a bit more.

In the second video I see a rider on a horse that she barely controls. It feels like an accident waiting to happen. All of the same issues, but with a horse that is a lot less forgiving. I would not jump until you have worked on these things.
I hope I don't sound too harsh. I am usually nicer with critiques. Must be our dreary weather which has me down. Thank you for listening with an open mind.
     
    01-12-2011, 05:53 PM
  #3
Yearling
I agree. Your hands were very far up his neck and you legs kept swaying backwards. Possibly kicking him some making him very tense. Good job handling him in the second video when he acted up. You need to keep your legs more still and you are also pretty bouncy when cantering work on relaxing and you will get that better. I agree that I don't think you should be jumping him yet until you get better at the canter and your position on the reins are better. In the second video he really acted up and bounced into a fast canter right before the jump it was at like 46 seconds or before that a little. Than can be really dangerous when jumping. I saw your whole balance get thrown off and that will make you throw his balance off. You really could hurt him or yourself.
     
    01-12-2011, 07:28 PM
  #4
Trained
The others already covered the rest. Just want to add, that until you can get the horse to relax, no real work can be accomplished. While walking on a connected but generous rein, try some flexing, shallow serpentines, anything to help the horse supple and release tension. Sometimes when horses are "up" it takes a good 30 minutes of this before moving onto working.
     
    01-12-2011, 09:50 PM
  #5
Weanling
I just want to suggest that you go back to an "easy" horse if possible...one that won't challenge you in speed especially, and work on your riding for a bit. Once your riding is pretty solid on a calmer horse, then move on up to horses like these. I don't know if that's an option for you or not, but if it is that might be what you need.
     
    01-12-2011, 11:15 PM
  #6
Weanling
It looks like you have some confidence, which can be the hardest thing to achieve for a lot of people.
My tip would be that when you jump, try to bend forward at the waist only as you go up instead of arching your upper back. It seems like you start leaning back and arching your back instead of bending forward at the waist slightly and (without putting your chin in the air) trying to keep your spine fairly straight vertically.
Remember, the most important thing after staying safe is that you and your horse are having fun. This is a hobby, so don't take what we say TOO seriously.
     
    01-12-2011, 11:24 PM
  #7
Super Moderator
Gottatrot, I am glad you mention the point of having fun and being safe. I felt that the rider was on the edge of safety in the second video, and the first video didn't look like much fun for the dark horse.
     
    01-13-2011, 06:15 AM
  #8
Foal
Thank you for the feedback guys :) I feel better now that I know what I need to improve on etc. im going to start joining in lessons again, I used to before but then I had an accident from another horse, wasnt even my fault suprisingly, she was one that had a mind of her own and I was just put on her :/ so I have lost alot of confidence because of that, infact since that accident, the only horses I've ridden are the 2 in the videos, since..september I think? The first horse is my own, she's usually more behaved than that, but it's really bad snow here right now so we can't go on hacks etc, which is whats making her hard to handle right now and hyper. Which makes me tense even more as I never know whats going to happen. And the second horse, is my friends, she was being bad so she made me go on her haha, and that was her actually being abit calmer, apparently she's like this because she used to be a BSJA horse or something? I can't remember, but she did alot of jumping. That was the first time I had ridden in 2 months since the accident.

So after all of this feedback, im definetely going to start joining in lessons again, getting confidence back, and making my horse chill!
     
    01-13-2011, 09:49 AM
  #9
Green Broke
Hey Erin!

Horse number 1 - A lot can be solved by having good hands with this horse. Your seat also needs to be adjusted but others have covered that. Have a look at the video from 3:00 - 4:00. Your hands are unsteady, moving up and down as you post. Also, occasionally you lose some balance in your upper body and your hands compensate to regain your balance - as if you were balancing across a log and waved your arms around when you thought you were falling except less exaggerated. Understandable on a log but when on a horse with the reins in your hands - your horse's mouth feels every movement. His head throwing is most likely a response to unsteady hands, work on that and he will relax much more in the bridle.

If you can have a lesson on a school horse I would recommend riding on a lunge with stirrups and no hands! Put them out to your side, put them on your head, put them on your hips and balance purely from your seat without letting your hands interfere. When you can do this comfortably and with good balance you may have your reins back! Did you know that the Spanish riding school makes their students ride for the first two years without reins or stirrups to develop an independant seat? Here is a piccie!

spanish riding school.jpg

Now of course I wouldn't suggest that you do it for that long and it will require you finding a quiet horse that you can trust but the lesson learned will be invaluable to your riding.

Just as a side note, I think your saddle is too far forward which won't help you OR him in the balance department.

Horse number 2 - This horse is going to require some cool, calm, confident riding, again with very sensitive and forgiving hands. You need to give somewhat in order to allow him to settle into the bridle. I can see that there is some worry on your behalf that he may take off. Much much more riding from the seat and INTO the bridle - holding him back constantly only makes him want to go constantly. When he almost refused the jump at the end there it was a classic case of the horse being confused by mixed signals from the saddle - you wanted him to go over the jump but were using all your strength to hold him back. He kicked up a little fuss when he didn't know if you wanted him to go or stop.

I think this guy needs a lot of good consistent flat work before trying him over the jumps again. Next time you do try him over jumps (hopefully not in the near future ) - make it a four jump grid with a one bounce stride between each. If he wants to rush then let him. Just keep him straight and let him sort his own feet out. He will learn not to rush if you give him more than one obstacle to think about.

Good luck with them both!
     
    01-13-2011, 11:48 AM
  #10
Foal
Thank you! This has also helped me understand alot!!
     

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