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difficulty steering please help

This is a discussion on difficulty steering please help within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • "get into a corner" "difficulty"

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    09-21-2012, 09:49 AM
  #11
Showing
Something I've done with students is to ride the horse at a walk, without using the reins, They are there "in case". The idea is that it allows the rider to figure out how weight shifts can influence where the horse goes. It's best done alone with no spectators as that's where the horse will want to go and stand. He may get into a corner and try to stand there. If all attempts fail to get him out of the corner only then is the use of the rein allowed. What is interesting about this is the rider's back, without reins often softens which is reflected thro the horse. When the rider picks up the reins, tension appears again in the lower back which again, reflects in the horse.
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    09-21-2012, 12:47 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinnys Whinny    
I beg to differ. This is not off topic, the OP is asking for advice on steering and that is the advice that people are giving. This is a forum, we all have our voice and the OP gets to decide which advice works for them. It is not for us to publicly say someone's advice is good or bad unless it is detrimental to what the OP is trying to do or dangerous for them or the horse.
You are right. I didn't go back and reread the original post and thought it was about WHY the horses weren't responding.

I'm sorry if it sounded like I was saying your advice was bad. That wasn't my intention.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinnys Whinny    
You can go to any reining pro, dressage rider, H/J and WP rider and pretty much get that you ride from your seat not by pulling on reins.
I guess I was assuming that the OP wasn't a professional rider and they weren't looking at professional horses. Those horses would have a lot more specific training to go off the riders seat. Joe Blow's horse down the street would not likely have that training.
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    09-21-2012, 12:59 PM
  #13
Trained
Most horseman tell you to use your aids "quietly." The word is a misnomer, but it really means that when a rider and horse are communicating very well, you see very little leg and arm motion from the rider.
A horse that "listens", or takes cues easily isn't necessarily super reactionary. He/she just requires a light leg, light pull on the reins and is sensitive to the rider's weight cues. Plus said horse is calm. (Your answer shouldn't involve collection or pushing the horse's energy into the bit from behind. If you ride long enough, you'll get there.)
Pulling the reins out to the side by the rider indicates a horse whose training hasn't been finished. A good school horse is a good teacher, though he/she will make the rider use more muscle to get the end result. This is important. If a school horse reacted as easily as a race car does, the student would become frightened and probably give up. If you are a new rider you want a horse that is finished, but a little dull. Horses that have learned to do a job well and are rewarded with kindness every time take great pride in their work. Look at those horses used for handicapped riding. Horses are very emotional, which could be why WE react emotionally around them.
You should be riding horses that will direct rein with your hands just in front of the pommel, thumbs up, and the width of the bit (~5".) Neck reining should be just in front of the pommel, too, and it shouldn't take a ton a of muscle to turn them.
Hope this helps. =D
     
    09-21-2012, 01:17 PM
  #14
Super Moderator
The mistake is thinking that horse , like cars, "steer" by pulling this or pushing that. Yes, there are systems to make a horse move this or that direction. But you aren't actually forceing the horse to go left or right. When you steer your car, you move the wheel to the right and the car goes exactly and porportionatel that direction. It has no choice, it is "forced" into that move (Thank God!).

But steering a horse is differenct because you do not force the horse right or left. You CUE the horse to do those moves on his own. Thus, once the hrose has taken the cue and begins to execute the move, you may no longer be "steering" but just allowing him to finish up the requested manuever.

Since different horses have different willingnesses to accept your cue, and different horses need a stronger cue than others, no two horses will "steer" the same.

The better you get as a rider, the better you become at adapting your cues to fit the horse, and also working with a dull horse to make him more willing to listen up , when lighter cues are given.
     
    10-04-2012, 11:44 PM
  #15
Foal
That was what I was wondering as well. When I got Emma we had "communication" problems. I would ask her for a direction in the method I learned. Sometimes she would and sometimes she wouldn't. What I discovered by watching and listening to how she responded was that she was trained to neck rein. When I would use my leg she automatically readied herself to move away from the rein on the same side as the leg. Once I took note of that her turns became more consistent. She still has her stubborn days, but now I know it's stubborn

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spotted    
maybe the horse is trained to neck rein. You would need to ask the owner.
     

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