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Discussion of Hunt seat and forward seat

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  • My horse hesitates at drop jumps
  • Pennine range

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    02-22-2012, 10:32 AM
  #41
Started
Ah, I now think it was Foxhunter who said he was from Dorset. Apologies

Is what I am looking at known as the Cheviots?

I once rode up there on the beach by Lindisfarne Island from a riding centre owned by 'Judge' Jeffries. His horse took me swimming in the sea.

Noone your photo was stunning - that is a beautiful part of Britain as well you know.
     
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    02-22-2012, 10:36 AM
  #42
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry Godden    
Hoopla
It is difficult to envisage that is your part of Dorset - certainly it is a part I have missed out on finding. You are a lucky man.
Dorset to me has always been a coastline or a tank range.
B G
'Tis I oo be in Darsetshire. 'e knows county well and picture bain't be any part I knows!
     
    02-22-2012, 11:24 AM
  #43
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry Godden    
Ah, I now think it was Foxhunter who said he was from Dorset. Apologies

Is what I am looking at known as the Cheviots?

I once rode up there on the beach by Lindisfarne Island from a riding centre owned by 'Judge' Jeffries. His horse took me swimming in the sea.
I hope you intended to go in the sea otherwise I can't imagine Dickie would have been very pleased.

Dickie Jeffreys (not "ies") owns a riding centre about 6 miles from me.

Yes I'm in the Cheviot Hills which is the top of the Pennine Range.

Lindisfarne is about 15 miles as the crow flies from here.

This is me and mine driving to Lindisfarne Castle on Holy Island




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    02-22-2012, 12:11 PM
  #44
Started
Northumberland, lovely country - a bit cold to live in but well worth the visit.

And there's you with a matching pair. Very smart

Dickie's horse took me galloping across the sands at a very fast pace. On the way back Dickie manoevred me and my trusty steed into the surf where he knew there was a scour. Suddenly there I am suddenly swimming in the sea on horseback for the first time ever. Magic memories.

He offered to take me up to the Beating of the Parish Boundaries over the border but he warned me that with my Cockney accent I'd need to have some mates from Down South as protection.

Herewith a photo of my much missed cob - Joe. I have the idea he was a 'Galloway' , he was certainly Gypsy bred . Does he look familiar?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 076.jpg (54.8 KB, 93 views)
File Type: jpg Joe Jag driveway.jpg (99.6 KB, 95 views)
File Type: jpg BG Joe lessons in arena.jpg (74.0 KB, 91 views)
     
    02-22-2012, 02:14 PM
  #45
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by mildot    
Another good one. She got left slightly behind on a couple of fences, which I would much rather do than the other possibility

095S Kaitlin Carroll Training Stadium Jumping Twin Rivers HT January 2012 (no audio) - YouTube
I do not think that this is particularly good. She is way to busy with her seat and hands. I also think that because of this and the fact her heels a jammed way to low, she is stiff and hollow in her lower back.
     
    02-22-2012, 02:36 PM
  #46
Super Moderator
Sorry I cannot pick up the URL - but go to Youtube and William Fox Pitt Cross Country.
I love the way Will rides, he is 6'5" and for his size rides shorter than most cross country.
In this video at 35s the horse hesitates at a drop, then launches. Will slips his reins and just points to the next fence and does nothing (he did tell me he was praying!)
Training and trust enabled them to get over it with no problem.
     
    02-22-2012, 03:12 PM
  #47
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
I do not think that this is particularly good. She is way to busy with her seat and hands. I also think that because of this and the fact her heels a jammed way to low, she is stiff and hollow in her lower back.
I do see the stiffness in her back reflected in some bouncess off the cantle. But I thought her hands were relatively quiet.
     
    02-22-2012, 03:16 PM
  #48
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
Sorry I cannot pick up the URL - but go to Youtube and William Fox Pitt Cross Country.
I love the way Will rides, he is 6'5" and for his size rides shorter than most cross country.
In this video at 35s the horse hesitates at a drop, then launches. Will slips his reins and just points to the next fence and does nothing (he did tell me he was praying!)
Training and trust enabled them to get over it with no problem.
WHOA
     
    02-22-2012, 04:11 PM
  #49
Banned
I have to put my moderator hat on here briefly.

I don't know who the rider is in the second video, but if she did not consent to have the video posted here and critiqued or used as an example, I think we should refrain from commenting further.

Moderator hat off, and back to our conversation.

Foxhunter,

I am a big fan of William Fox Pitt, and I will see if I can find something of his to post. I love moments such as you have described, because they are the proof of training technique - if you have always ridden your horse held precisiely between your leg, seat and hand and never independently, freely forward you get in those sticky situations and your horse does not know how to find a fifth leg and save you. You can get away with that in the jumpers, though it will never be a style I admire. However, in both foxhunting and XC, your horse must be secure and confident enough to continue to go forward and where he's pointed in those "Oh, crap!" slip the reins sort of moments.

PS - the horse in my avatar had a much more successful career as a jumper than an event horse as dressage was not his forte. We frequently disagreed about pace and balance going into combinations; which mean we frequently jumped in really, really wrong, at which time I would slip or drop the reins and say "Okay, smarty pants, you got us in this mess, you get us out." and we not only both lived through the experience, we won our share. A lesser or differently trained horse would stop, pull a rail or crash. (Okay, and a better horse would have listened to me, since I walked the course and he didn't, but we eventually sorted that out.)
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    02-22-2012, 04:53 PM
  #50
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by maura    
I have to put my moderator hat on here briefly.

I don't know who the rider is in the second video, but if she did not consent to have the video posted here and critiqued or used as an example, I think we should refrain from commenting further.

Moderator hat off, and back to our conversation.

Foxhunter,

I am a big fan of William Fox Pitt, and I will see if I can find something of his to post. I love moments such as you have described, because they are the proof of training technique - if you have always ridden your horse held precisiely between your leg, seat and hand and never independently, freely forward you get in those sticky situations and your horse does not know how to find a fifth leg and save you. You can get away with that in the jumpers, though it will never be a style I admire. However, in both foxhunting and XC, your horse must be secure and confident enough to continue to go forward and where he's pointed in those "Oh, crap!" slip the reins sort of moments.

PS - the horse in my avatar had a much more successful career as a jumper than an event horse as dressage was his forte. We frequently disagreed about pace and balance going into combinations; which mean we frequently jumped in really, really wrong, at which time I would slip or drop the reins and say "Okay, smarty pants, you got us in this mess, you get us out." and we not only both lived through the experience, we won our share. A lesser or differently trained horse would stop, pull a rail or crash. (Okay, and a better horse would have listened to me, since I walked the course and he didn't, but we eventually sorted that out.)
I think that any horse, especially as they go up the grades eventing, thinks that they know better at the start of the course.
Watch many of the video's, including the one posted here earlier and that of William, and they are both, as are many others, having to demand rather than ask, over the first fence.

I agree with you about a bold horse. Very important around here over the hedges and trappy fences we come across.

The advantage of hunting here is that it does give a horse a good grounding for jumping off all sorts of terrain.
One of our show jumpers took his top international show jumper out hunting several times because the horse was unsure jumping if the ground was wet/muddy. The horse loved it and the problem was solved.

One of the best rider CC was Licinda Green (nee Prior Palmer) I watched her jumping the Trout hatchery at Burley. The horse made a mistake and nearly went down. She just sat there giving him his head and somehow the horse recovered, jumped the fence immediately in front of him and the one out of the water.
Lucinda rarely rode a horse in a martingale because if things like this happened they needed total freedom of their heads to recover.
     

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