Double thread: Riding question and mental question - Page 2
   

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Double thread: Riding question and mental question

This is a discussion on Double thread: Riding question and mental question within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        10-30-2010, 05:52 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    The age is mostly because the only barn I know of that is reputable that teaches dressage is mostly adults only. I like the idea of experimenting.

    Well...I rode today! And the instructor is different from the one I don't like. What I mean is that the "winter" instructor is now teaching my lessons, and she's a lot more understanding. We were doing individual raised cavaletti in a line today, and at the walk I was fine. As soon as I started trotting to it, I closed up. My horse had to haul herself over the cavaletti because I wouldn't give her cues to keep moving over it. Then...Someone on the side said "Come on don't just drop her! Pretend its a jump and look STRAIGHT!" I nearly cried. Eventually, I got used to it and was able to get her moving. Later in the lesson we were doing them at the canter, which scared me a little. The very first one I did was fine, and the second one she took HUGE and I basically latched onto her neck for dear life. I brought her to a walk and walked around a bit. We continued on with some good ones and some bad ones, with her occasionally running away with me (she was really in shape over the summer so she has a lot of excess energy) (The running away is a problem but its mostly an exercise thing. When she's in shape she's PERFECT.) In the other direction I only did the cavaletti once because I was getting really nervous, especially because she's unbalanced in this direction. So after all this I felt pretty nervous for jumping.

    It started with me jumping a cross rail and holding onto her afterward, but after a lot of confidence jumping I got back into my normal self. Confident, with the ability to actually RELEASE over jumps so that I didn't fall on my face on her neck. 2' 6". On my last course of four jumps, I only got nervous before two of them. And my wonderful horse took them both well anyway. I was really happy, but I still have a lot to do before I can jump any higher. There's just so much to jumping and so much RISK to jumping that you really have to do it all well before you can move on to bigger jumps. I don't think I will for a long time...

    Also, minirant:
    So ever since the school year has started, I haven't been able to ride as much as I like. Therefore my horse that was ridden every day over the summer and was insanely in shape is now fat and has more energy then a five year old with coffee. This one woman rides her twice a week but does virtually nothing. 15 minute walk, 15 minute trot, 2 strides of canter, maybe. So this other girl has started riding her. This girl believes that she can train any horse to do anything, when she is really an amateur. She will TELL the trainer what is right, and will often refuse to take advice. She's made me quite angry in the past. Anyway, this girl is now riding my horse because I don't often enough. She is RUINING my work. She used to take the bit well. She used to feel light (even when fat) at the trot and respond to my half halt cues and listen to my seat. She used to respond to my cues to slow the canter. She used to never ever EVER rush a jump. Notice the past tense in all these things....AUGH. I pray I can start actually leasing soon so I can request that she NEVER RIDES HER EVER AGAIN.

    Endminirant....sorry for the huge post.
         
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        10-31-2010, 01:34 AM
      #12
    Super Moderator
    I commiseratie with you regarding the frustration of having leassor "ruin" what you have worked hard to imput in the horse.

    With regard to your description of your lesson (that was ONE lesson?). It seems really wierd that your instructor had you move on to cantering cavaletties when you were having trouble at the trot. It seems to me that you should have stayed at the trot/cavaletti much longer, until you are really confident. Say, several lessons. And then going on to actually jumping when cantering cavaletti caused you to go up onto the horse's neck? That is just asking for a fall, if you ask me.
    I would not have my horse move so quickly through learning steps of each skill. I would want him to have each step down securely before progressing onto the next . Why would you not grant yourself the same courtesy? That does not speak well of the instructor, if you ask me.
         
        10-31-2010, 09:42 AM
      #13
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    I commiseratie with you regarding the frustration of having leassor "ruin" what you have worked hard to imput in the horse.

    With regard to your description of your lesson (that was ONE lesson?). It seems really wierd that your instructor had you move on to cantering cavaletties when you were having trouble at the trot. It seems to me that you should have stayed at the trot/cavaletti much longer, until you are really confident. Say, several lessons. And then going on to actually jumping when cantering cavaletti caused you to go up onto the horse's neck? That is just asking for a fall, if you ask me.
    I would not have my horse move so quickly through learning steps of each skill. I would want him to have each step down securely before progressing onto the next . Why would you not grant yourself the same courtesy? That does not speak well of the instructor, if you ask me.
    I don't blame the instructor in this case. She was doing a test lesson and wanted to see how well each student could stride the cavaletti. She was okay with me not doing it. I don't think I was specific enough, but I was confident at the trot when we started cantering. I actually think in this case moving quickly helped a bit because I forced myself to face my fears. From reading my post you would think I did too much jumping, but while jumping a crossrail after multiple tries I finally felt GOOD and went to another jump. The other jump felt even better.
    I mean, I would have rather gone a little slower...But this lesson was two hours, and gave me plenty of time to think and feel good.
         
        11-07-2010, 12:43 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Hi Tymer,
    I don't have much new to add but support the thought that this will take time. Be kind and patient with yourself. Jumping too soon will only add trauma to the trauma. If you trainer is going to be a pain about it, then, well, hmm. What if it were your horse that was scared and being pushed too hard? Would you allow the trainer to bully a horse to do something it wasn't ready for? Or would you stick up for it? Stick up for yourself. If your trainer can't focus on a whole ground work lesson, oh well. That gives you a chance to experiment with some things while she isn't around.

    Try reading Centered Riding. Great book. Gives you lots of exercises to try.
         
        11-07-2010, 09:57 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MaryMary    
    Hi Tymer,
    I don't have much new to add but support the thought that this will take time. Be kind and patient with yourself. Jumping too soon will only add trauma to the trauma. If you trainer is going to be a pain about it, then, well, hmm. What if it were your horse that was scared and being pushed too hard? Would you allow the trainer to bully a horse to do something it wasn't ready for? Or would you stick up for it? Stick up for yourself. If your trainer can't focus on a whole ground work lesson, oh well. That gives you a chance to experiment with some things while she isn't around.

    Try reading Centered Riding. Great book. Gives you lots of exercises to try.
    Yeah, the trainer we have during the summer is nice in that we get to play with our horses...But at the same time COME ON! We're paying for these lessons here! I've been looking for some good riding books. Practical Horseman just put out a big list of good ones, I'll add that to the list.

    I'm feeling much better now. I think I just needed to relax. I did some of the best jumping in my life by letting my horse just pick out her own spots to jump from and just keeping a rhythm.
         
        11-08-2010, 05:42 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Low hands are very important. The hands should still be forward infront of the saddle, but lowering them allows the rider to solidify her position and balance - in effect helping the horse.

    What I think the OP should do is just not jump for a while. You're not going to get your confidence back by terrifying yourself over fences. Take some dressage lessons and learn to ride more effectively. Once your confidence is back up - try jumping again. It may just not be your cup of tea.
         
        11-09-2010, 05:28 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
    Low hands are very important. The hands should still be forward infront of the saddle, but lowering them allows the rider to solidify her position and balance - in effect helping the horse.

    What I think the OP should do is just not jump for a while. You're not going to get your confidence back by terrifying yourself over fences. Take some dressage lessons and learn to ride more effectively. Once your confidence is back up - try jumping again. It may just not be your cup of tea.
    I love jumping. I love dressage too. That's why I so easily got back to jumping without much worry. I just needed to relax.
         

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