Fast Ponies
 
 

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Fast Ponies

This is a discussion on Fast Ponies within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Fast ponies
  • How to stop my very fast pony

 
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    04-17-2012, 12:00 AM
  #1
Weanling
Fast Ponies

Wow I have not been on here for a very long time! Well hi everyone! I have been riding a new pony at the barn named Miner. I'm going to be showing him this weekend also. I have only ridden him a few times but I am going to have one more lesson before Sunday. He is a true jumper pony and really great. I can control him pretty well when we are actually jumping a course, but he will fling around at the end and tries to drag me around. He is a really great pony and I am actually looking into leasing/buying him if I can really talk my dad into it. He already loves this horse so my chances would be better. Anyways.. and advise on keeping him from dragging me? I have an idea but I just want to see what others say.
     
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    04-17-2012, 07:58 AM
  #2
Showing
Welcome back :)!

Though personally I wouldn't want to lease or buy a horse that drags me around.. maybe a lesson horse to learn but not one that I'm paying lots of money for.

By dragging you around, do you mean blowing through your aids and leaning on the reins or what..? Does he understand a half halt? Are you influencing his speedy legs with your position?
     
    04-17-2012, 08:35 AM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
Welcome back :)!

Though personally I wouldn't want to lease or buy a horse that drags me around.. maybe a lesson horse to learn but not one that I'm paying lots of money for.

By dragging you around, do you mean blowing through your aids and leaning on the reins or what..? Does he understand a half halt? Are you influencing his speedy legs with your position?
Thanks! =)
It's kind of confusing to explain. But when were done jumping a course, I guess he just gets over-excited? He just likes to run around. He will try to drag me, but I don't let him. If that makes sense? And yeah, he will usually listen to a half halt, but it still takes him a while just to stop.
     
    04-17-2012, 08:39 AM
  #4
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by HorseLoverHunter    
Thanks! =)
It's kind of confusing to explain. But when were done jumping a course, I guess he just gets over-excited? He just likes to run around. He will try to drag me, but I don't let him. If that makes sense? And yeah, he will usually listen to a half halt, but it still takes him a while just to stop.
It sounds like he shouldn't be jumping until he listens to you better on the flat. I'm no expert in jumping but I do know that horses should not speed off without listening to the rider after they jump.

Hopefully others experienced in jumping will weigh in :)

What I would do, though, is practice lots of transitions and get him really responding to your cues. Especially trot to halt, canter to halt. Etc. Add some backing up.
     
    04-18-2012, 08:29 PM
  #5
Foal
Hey, I have been riding jumpers and ponies for about 10 years now. You should always have an interesting warm up.

What I mean by this is doing lots of transitions. Walk/ halt. Trot/ halt and Canter/halt. Even your walk to canter, and vise versa. Trot to halt, and trot to hand gallop are the ones I like the most to work on it really gets them listening.

Along with transitions you should do serpintines, and circles. Really get your pony moving/ listening to slightest signal of the leg and very important the slightest half halt.

Try theses things and don't jump until your pony is really listening to you. And even then maybe start with like 2 or 3 jumps and get him listening before you try a full course.
     
    04-18-2012, 09:00 PM
  #6
Foal
We have two horses at my barn that like to 'spurt' after a jump. Both listen perfectly on the flat, but the jumps get them a little off; one is nervous, the other excited. We have the same exercise for both.

Start with a single jump so that you don't have to worry about how long it takes you stop afterward. This is best done in a field or very large ring where you have lots of room to get the halt. Start by trotting into the jump and asking for the halt two to three strides after you land. Make sure you're halting on a straight line. We've found that putting a cone on a straight line in front of the jump can help if your pony likes to veer off. Just put it far enough up that you won't run it over it the pony doesn't stop in time :) When you feel comfortable canter the single and to get your halt in the same amount of time/striding afterwards.

Once you're consistently halting within five to six strides after the jump add a second one in. Give yourself at least a seven to eight strides between the jumps. Start by trotting into the first one, halting in the middle, and then trotting the second one. Once you're good with that, canter the first, halt in the middle, and trot the second.

It keeps the horse paying attention to you and thinking about what you're asking instead of focusing on what they see in the ring/field/trail/etc and assuming. It's a lot of work and takes lots of patience, but it is well worth it to have a pony or horse that listens to the aids no matter what they /anticipate/ you wanting.

Good luck!
     
    04-18-2012, 09:04 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nevreme    
We have two horses at my barn that like to 'spurt' after a jump. Both listen perfectly on the flat, but the jumps get them a little off; one is nervous, the other excited. We have the same exercise for both.

Start with a single jump so that you don't have to worry about how long it takes you stop afterward. This is best done in a field or very large ring where you have lots of room to get the halt. Start by trotting into the jump and asking for the halt two to three strides after you land. Make sure you're halting on a straight line. We've found that putting a cone on a straight line in front of the jump can help if your pony likes to veer off. Just put it far enough up that you won't run it over it the pony doesn't stop in time :) When you feel comfortable canter the single and to get your halt in the same amount of time/striding afterwards.

Once you're consistently halting within five to six strides after the jump add a second one in. Give yourself at least a seven to eight strides between the jumps. Start by trotting into the first one, halting in the middle, and then trotting the second one. Once you're good with that, canter the first, halt in the middle, and trot the second.

It keeps the horse paying attention to you and thinking about what you're asking instead of focusing on what they see in the ring/field/trail/etc and assuming. It's a lot of work and takes lots of patience, but it is well worth it to have a pony or horse that listens to the aids no matter what they /anticipate/ you wanting.

Good luck!
Very much agree with this, this is what I did to ge my neurotic thoroughbred to listen.
     
    04-20-2012, 01:08 AM
  #8
Foal
I had a lot of the same issuesw with my pony when I first got him. After fighting with him for 6 months we went back to basics and did a lot more work on his dressage. After 3 months of that he started waiting for my cues and respecting my seat and leg and now stops just from tension on my muscles. Jumping is his reward, and if he starts being a freight train at any point he goes right back to collected dressage work and lots of serpentines, circles and leg yields.
     

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fast, jumper, lesson, pony, riding

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