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First English Lesson Tonight

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        09-07-2013, 12:57 AM
      #11
    Yearling
    Thanks everyone. I will practice my posting again tomorrow. I worked so hard to sit the trot in my Western saddle I am just as confused at why my rearend isn't glued down there.

    My instructor was pleased with my legs and arms until I started getting tired. She mentioned she could tell my balance started to faulter after we had been working at it.

    I am holding the "up" beat too long... the saddle is smacking me in the rear and then I down into the saddle for the second smack.

    I'm watching youtube videos of people posting to see the count better.
         
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        09-07-2013, 12:59 AM
      #12
    Super Moderator
    I well remember when posting used to just exhaust me! I guarantee it will get easier, such that you can do it all day and not break a sweat. Guarantee it.
         
        09-07-2013, 01:13 AM
      #13
    Weanling
    I've been working on my posting trot with my new mare - I think the more you slow it down and keep that rhythm the easier it is in the beginning!

    Posting is hard work - don't let anyone tell you otherwise haha
    DriftingShadow likes this.
         
        09-07-2013, 01:37 AM
      #14
    Trained
    Posting is work, but we work so the horse may not need to work as hard:
    "Comparing rising and sitting trot

    This was the main point of the study and what they found surprised them a little. The horse's back was just as extended whenever the rider was sitting, whether they were doing a sitting trot or during the sitting phase of the rising trot. They didn't expect that. However, during the rising phase of the trot, the back was almost, but not quite, up to the same level as the unridden horse. So, they learned that the back stays extended more consistently during a sitting trot and is least extended when unridden, but during rising trot there is a lot more variation between maximum extension and maximum flexion. In other words, it has the greatest range of motion during rising trot. (Range of motion was least when unridden and medium in the sitting trot.) The researcher's comments were that they weren't sure if this was good or bad. "It may be more challenging for the lumbar back on one hand (certainly when there is existing pathology in this area) and on the other hand, it may help to create maximal suppleness of movement."
    Yup, riding a horse does make his back extend...
         
        09-07-2013, 04:32 AM
      #15
    Foal
    I'm still getting the hang of the post too, I feel ya! Especially after you starting getting tired. XD What I like to do is count/ talk to myself in my head. I glance down at the shoulder quickly to check the lead and start saying to myself: up, down, up, down, with his beat, while I'm still sitting it. After a couple of strides, since I have the rhythm in my head, I can start going with it. And I keep saying that in my head until I feel I have it. And a lot of it is just practicing over and over again. (Unfortunately haha) :)
         
        09-07-2013, 08:43 AM
      #16
    Foal
    I've only been riding for a couple of years, but what really helped me wasn't the "up-down," but "rise and fall with the shoulder on the wall." Once I realized my motion was following (or is it leading? ) the motion of the outside shoulder, it really made sense! I hope you continue to enjoy trying out the english discipline!
         
        09-13-2013, 12:02 AM
      #17
    Foal
    Cool stuff
         
        09-15-2013, 04:52 PM
      #18
    Yearling
    Additional Questions

    Hi Everyone,

    Just spending a lazy Sunday watching YouTube questions. Several video clips said you can touch the horse's neck for balance.

    In watching the videos, I am sure I am not maintaining good hand position. That will be me next aha at the barn tomorrow night. I think I am higher up and not down close to the withers.

    But, out of curiousity, when you are posting, did you ever touch your horse to maintain balance when you were first starting out? I didn't realize this was an option.
         
        09-15-2013, 05:31 PM
      #19
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AQHSam    
    Hi Everyone,

    Just spending a lazy Sunday watching YouTube questions. Several video clips said you can touch the horse's neck for balance.

    In watching the videos, I am sure I am not maintaining good hand position. That will be me next aha at the barn tomorrow night. I think I am higher up and not down close to the withers.

    But, out of curiousity, when you are posting, did you ever touch your horse to maintain balance when you were first starting out? I didn't realize this was an option.
    Yes, I'd hold onto a chunk of mane instead of using the neck to balance. Also it'd prevent me from yanking on my horse's face.
         
        09-15-2013, 10:34 PM
      #20
    Yearling
    Thanks sky.

    The youtube videos were pretty informative.

    I noticed several things.

    First, when picturing my posture, I am sure my hands are "higher" on the neck. I believe I am equal on both sides of the neck, but much higher than the wither. When watching the videos, the riders appear to have their hands nearly touching the saddle. Which, may explain why I feel I have to come up so high to "bring my hips through my elbows." My elbows are high!

    Second, leg position. Some of the women in the videos had floppy legs and some had legs that barely moved at all. It was those riders who had the still legs, who looked the most effortless. I know that my legs are floppy spaghetti legs. One video stated that if your leg is too far back (or was it forward? Dang, I need to go back and watch.) either way, the leg position determines your forward position and if the leg position is wrong you will be off balance on the "up" and most likely sit back on the down (and sitting back in chair position screws it all to heck.)

    This same trainer discussed center of gravity with the leg position. And how a rider tends to go higher up when learning and that screws up his or her center of gravity. By positioning the legs correctly and rising "just enough" to avoid the horse's bounce in the trot, the rider maintains a lower center of gravity and balance.

    This trainer also talked about the position of the hands and balance and lower hands aided in balance.

    Several trainers spoke about opening the knees, and opening the elbows during the post forward. I know I am clenching with my inner thighs, probably to my knees.

    I am going to have to work that in my head a bit more. I'm not sure if I get the opening the knees bit.

    I probably don't open my elbows. I am trying to feel the horse's mouth and I am probably stiff. I will have to relax from the shoulder's down.

    Good videos. And you can see the type of student I am. The trainers who took the time to break down the what is happening gave me more of an aha moment than the trainers that just instructed you to what you should do.

    If I understand why I am doing something it helps reinforce the how to do it.

    Well, back to youtube!
         

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