Help with Aids and Control - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding

Help with Aids and Control

This is a discussion on Help with Aids and Control within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Riding aids improving my seat

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    09-27-2010, 11:49 PM
  #11
Foal
Barry, thank you so much for your post! I will definitely follow your suggestions. I especially appreciate the posture tips, that's the sort of thing I can imprint on my mind and be mindful of every time I am in the saddle. I agree 100% percent about muscle development. I have been working hard on improving my strength and balance. I have recently recovered from a particularly nasty hip joint issue and my muscles in that area are very loose and weak. I have been doing exercises recommended by my coach as well as inline skating almost everyday. I hope to see some improvement in my body control and a significant difference by next week.

I have contacted the head coach about my concerns and she had agreed to meet with me one on one to address my concerns with the basics.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    09-28-2010, 04:22 AM
  #12
Guest
Raidress
A hip joint issue may, repeat may, give cause for you to sit lightly lopsided - get someone to photo you from the front and the rear. With a schoolmaster horse then it won't matter because the horse will probably compensate but as and when you move up to a more sensitive horse it might.

Take you time and work on getting your posture right and holding it for the ride
- without getting stiff or tense - that's the key.
Keeping your lower legs still at the trot needs to be learned.

The schoolmaster is also useful for helping you develop your hands - ie seeking equal and gentle contact thru the bit with the horse's mouth at all paces.

Repetitive work now on a calm steady horse in the arena helps you develop your seat for use over the rest of your riding career

B
     
    09-28-2010, 07:13 PM
  #13
Foal
I would hope that it wouldn't cause too much of an issue being that I am equally weak on both sides, and the types of exercises I am doing should prevent any inequalities. (I hope)

Good point on the reins. I noted this my last ride, to keep an elastic but tidy handle on the reins. Definitely something to remember for my rider-up mantra!
     
    09-28-2010, 07:50 PM
  #14
Foal
The Jane Savoie video was really great, but it cut off after explaining the seat!

I took quite a few notes on the video and it is great information. But I need the rest of it about legs and reins. I can't find it anywhere.....and her DVD's are expensive and most of them are on dressage. I wonder where the video posted came from? (which DVD or program).

What a bummer!
     
    09-29-2010, 01:37 AM
  #15
Yearling
Do a search on youtube and you'll come up with tons of her videos. I agree, she's great!
     
    09-29-2010, 01:58 PM
  #16
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by tealamutt    
do a search on youtube and you'll come up with tons of her videos. I agree, she's great!
The other half of the video isn't there... *cries*

So far what I have been able to dig up is this:

Pressure in the middle with the heel causes the horse to move it's entire body away from the pressure. Applying a slight amount of tension to the opposite rein prevents a full turn.

Pressure at the girth cues the horse to move his front end. Pressure at the flank causes him to move his rear away from the pressure.

I am assuming that these types of cues are all done with the heel.

Speed and gait are cued with the saddle and the upper leg. And there should always be contact with the rider's calf and the barrel.

Is this correct?
     
    09-29-2010, 08:35 PM
  #17
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raidress    
The other half of the video isn't there... *cries*

So far what I have been able to dig up is this:

Pressure in the middle with the heel causes the horse to move it's entire body away from the pressure. Applying a slight amount of tension to the opposite rein prevents a full turn.
Yes, this is basically correct. Your oustide rein will always have some contact - no pulling, just a "handshake" contact. Ideally, you'll be riding from the seat, inside leg into outside hand to create bend and softness, but that may be a way off yet. As far as using the heel, it is ultimately a very subtle thing. Don't really dramatically turn your toes out and goose with the heel - ask first with simply more lower-calf pressure, and then move up to heel if you don't get a response. The ultimate goal is invisibility of aids, so always first ask with the softness that you eventually want to be able to use. Your seat and a shift in weight can play a great role here, too. Well-schooled horses can pick up on a weight shift alone and scoot sideways beautifully.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raidress    
Pressure at the girth cues the horse to move his front end. Pressure at the flank causes him to move his rear away from the pressure.
Again, yes, but there shouldn't be a big change in your leg position. You shouldn't be reaching back, sacrificing your shoulder/hip/heel alignment, to move the hindquarters over. At girth, behind girth, and flank "buttons" are actually very close together for most horses. If the horse is just learning, the "buttons" may be exaggerated, but a finished horse can readily discern your meaning with minimal change in leg position.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raidress    
I am assuming that these types of cues are all done with the heel.
As I said above, heel as a "backup"; lower calf closure as a "true aid" so to speak.

If you think that you're riding with too much heel, thus turning your toes out too much and misaligning your legs, take a look at your riding boots, half chaps, or pants post-ride. Dirt/wear patterns will tell you where you're contact is falling and give you an idea what to change, if anything. The bulk of dirt and wear should not be on the backs of your legs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raidress    
Speed and gait are cued with the saddle and the upper leg. And there should always be contact with the rider's calf and the barrel.

Is this correct?
Yes. Dressage-speaking, the seat aids come from more than just the rider's immediate backside. Everything from the knees to the waist can be involved in seat cues.

Lordy, this is tough to describe!!

I don't think anyone posted this link yet:The Art of Classical Riding--Dressage Training for Horse and Rider

All of the articles are worth reading, but you may find some of the "Classical Seat Series", near the top of the list, most helpful in describing the application of the aids.

Sally Swift's book Centered Riding also discusses the aids and their application, I believe, but I don't have my copy with me right now to say absolutely for sure. Even if it doesn't, it's worth a read anyway.
     
    09-30-2010, 06:42 PM
  #18
Foal
Thanks for the clarification!

What I have learned just in the past few days has done miracle for my riding. Now I am having a bit of trouble with cuing while in a trot. I think maybe my seat is not secure enough yet. Seems like it happens often that I lose my proper boot position in the stirrup when I attempt to apply pressure during the trot in order to tell my horse to pass or to circle. ( I have yet to accomplish a circle in the trot less than half the size of the arena :P )

I guess my seat isn't perfect and my balance isn't up to par just yet either. I am not sure. Cuing with the rein works sometimes, but I feel that it is sloppy and at times a bit desperate.

I have made fantastic improvements posting, but I feel that I certainly have not mastered it by any means. And cuing at anything faster than a walk is very difficult at this point. So those are my goals next to conquer, or at least get some sort of understanding on what I need to do.

Picked up a few books from the library, hoping to find some tidbits of enlightenment there as well.

Thanks a ton everyone for the info so far! It has really helped me out in a big way.
     
    10-01-2010, 05:45 AM
  #19
Guest
Raidress
There has been a thread recently on the subject of the 'independent' seat - it is the acquisition of a stable riding position which allows the rider to apply the correct aids accurately. The more advanced the horse, the more stable the platform for the rider to sit on and work from.

Oh it is so difficult to put all this into words. When eventually it does all come right for you, and hopefully it will with practise and time, it is all very obvious.

The rider must be able to sit still in the saddle at all paces so as to be able to give the correct aids accurately through the bottom,the under thighs, the lower legs and feet and also the hands through the reins and bit to the mouth of the horse.

The skimpy English cut dressage saddle permits very close contact with the horse. Maintaining at all times a constant subtle contact with the horse's mouth permits communication between rider and horse. Even the correct use of the 'hands and fingers' is a knack to be acquired.

Let me declare that even 35 years of riding I am neither expert nor an elegant rider. It was not until recently after I had acquired a horse which seems , in the hands of an expert rider, to have a natural ability for dressage that I began to appreciate the more subtle aspects of the art of riding. But now when I sit on a 'regular' horse which is neither as sensitive nor as forward going as my mare, I realize what I have been missing for these years. I have never been one to seek to perform a display. My one good eye does not provide the 'eye' to dissect a horse's action but at least when mounted I can now 'feel' better the horse than ever I did before.

Horse riding is a fascinating hobby/sport and it takes a lifetime to understand
- even if you are constantly trying to learn. Thank you for making me think how best to put my thoughts on this post.
Welcome to the club.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
aids for extension AQHA English Riding 4 09-22-2010 06:10 PM
The aids AQHA English Riding 10 06-20-2010 11:08 AM
Issues with his leg aids? SorrelHorse Horse Training 4 03-29-2010 08:31 PM
outside aids vrs inside aids kerplop English Riding 5 05-03-2009 08:51 AM
Leg aids Horse_Chick Horse Training 9 06-28-2008 09:20 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0