Help with heel and distance? PLEASE! I'm extremely frustrated!
 
 

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Help with heel and distance? PLEASE! I'm extremely frustrated!

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        07-27-2011, 11:53 AM
      #1
    Foal
    Help with heel and distance? PLEASE! I'm extremely frustrated!

    Last night was the WORST lesson I've ever had. My horse would not go straight to the jumps, he was stcking his hind out and I kept pulling his nose to the inside. Then we didn't get one nice distance! It was either WAY too big, or way too short. I have no idea how to get a distance! And I'm doing bigger jumps now, but I don't know what to do with my body over them, I'm always either left behind, or jumping "for him". Also,my leg is a pendulum over the jumps..my **** heel wont stay down and still!! I'm so upset! Please help me!!
         
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        07-27-2011, 01:25 PM
      #2
    Foal
    Bumping(: please I need your advice, I'm stuck!
         
        07-27-2011, 01:53 PM
      #3
    Started
    I would suggest lots of gymastics. That way he has to listen to you and where he should be taking off from. It would also help you just distances as well. (dont know how much experience you have judging distances and counting strides up fences).

    Also, when I was learning distances, my trainer would have me count down the last 3 strides. ( I would always count 1, 2, 3,) and go right after 3. It was a good excercise because at the count of 3 I was asking the horse to go, rather than just sitting there. It taught me to me more in tuned to how the horse was moving and adjust the length of his stride to get the take off spot that I wanted.

    You learn how to ride to all the way to the jump, rather than giving a little leg and stop riding 2 strides out. (not that we realize we do this, but I think most us go through this problem learning to jump)
         
        07-27-2011, 01:56 PM
      #4
    Foal
    Thank you SO much! I never knew the point of counting, but now I understand it! I'm sure this will help so much!
         
        07-27-2011, 02:55 PM
      #5
    Banned
    I would suggest going backwards a few steps. If you are having that much problem with your base of support (lower leg being a pendulum) you really need to step back, get your body working independently and then worry about the bigger jumps.

    It sounds like your horse needs a step back too. Once you can regulate his pace and stride and keeping him straight (and bending him at the right times) on the flat and over ground poles, then you can move up to the bigger jumps.
         
        07-30-2011, 08:30 PM
      #6
    Foal
    Just this month I "got it" with my jumping, in that I consistently go with the horse and don't get shaken loose over the jumps. The difference for me was the difference between an insanely hot day and a normal day. On the hot day, I was having to really press with my calf to get the horse to jump, and I went with him beautifully. On my next ride, I was back to flopping. My trainer explained the difference was the extra leg on the hot day. From that lesson on I realized HOW MUCH lower leg you need on your horse to keep from having a leg pendulum. It's way more than you use at walk, trot, canter or poles.

    I still grab huge chunks of mane, and I'm no made jumper, but at least I no longer have floppy everywhere and heels coming up.

    I am also a fan of George Morris in Practical Horseman magazine. For every rider having trouble with form over jumps, he tells them to do lots of work without stirrups. It is not just balance and experience but the strength of your legs that carries you safely over the jump. Mr. Morris suggests 10 - 15 mins posting or cantering without stirrups at the beginning of every ride.

    Good luck!
         
        07-31-2011, 08:23 AM
      #7
    Showing
    I had even more horrible lesson last Fri : my quite advanced (for her level) qh didn't want to go straight, didn't want to bend, didn't want to pick a correct lead on canter, plus when I reminded her it's NOT OK to behave like that she threw a huge buck on me.

    When I had lovely lesson on my much less advanced paint yesterday and was complaining about "bad lesson" day before to my trainer she said: "It's not a bad lesson. It's when you see what can go wrong at home and learn how to deal with it and correct it". And she's very right.

    Don't take it such pessimistic. Even during "bad" lesson you still learn something: in particularly what you need to work on more. Horses have bad days too (as well as people). May be he was tired. May be YOU were tired and he felt it. Just take a deep breath, leave it behind and work on improving those things.
         
        07-31-2011, 02:41 PM
      #8
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
    Don't take it such pessimistic. Even during "bad" lesson you still learn something: in particularly what you need to work on more. Horses have bad days too (as well as people). May be he was tired. May be YOU were tired and he felt it. Just take a deep breath, leave it behind and work on improving those things.
    I agree with this! I can have fantastic lessons one week and then completely crappy ones the next. That's part of riding - continue on and remember what you did wrong, but learn from it! :) Seeing a distance to a fence can take time - it took me almost all winter last year before I even started getting my strides up to a fence/pole right. Just practice practice practice and good luck!
         

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