Help with outside rein and bending
 
 

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Help with outside rein and bending

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  • Inside rein outside leg
  • How to use the outside rein

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    04-24-2012, 11:23 PM
  #1
Foal
Help with outside rein and bending

In my lesson I was trying to ride on the outside rein, but I'm getting really confused... You have to keep more pressure on the outside rein and use inside leg right? Also when you are bending, how do you use the outside rein? I can't seem to bend and be on the outside rein at the same time. I guess im uncoordinated ha! So I would really appreciate if you guys to explain it in simple terms. Thanks a bunch!
     
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    04-25-2012, 12:28 AM
  #2
Started
Is this like neck reining for english folks? Lol

I imagine the rein is more of a push. Usually when I'm turning with the outside rein, I like to keep the inside nice and bent. To do this, I will go into the turn and periodically reach down and pull on the inside rein, keeping his nose pointed in, and pressure on the inside leg to keep his shoulder up. Soon my horses learn that pressure from the outside rein also means to bend their bodies.

But, I could be way off here, lol
     
    04-25-2012, 12:37 AM
  #3
Trained
Oh vair oh - you just made me LOL! It's not the same as neck reining lol. Thanks for that though

It's not "more" pressure, it's just constant pressure if that makes sense? And bend comes from the outside rein rather than the inside - your leg asks for the bend, and you allow the bend with your outside hand. How much you allow will determine the extent of the bend.
oh vair oh likes this.
     
    04-25-2012, 12:38 AM
  #4
Super Moderator
Is this for direct reining riding? Like english or dressage?

My understanding is that the inside rein will ask for the flexion to the inside of the turn and get th horse thinking in that direction. The outside rein, laid against the neck and fairly steady, support the horse , and backs up the suggestion to bend to the left, which is also created by the legs.

The outside rein sets the limit of the bend, which is initiated by the inside. So the inside rein says, "bend this way , or rather flex this way and think this way" and when the horse starts to flex his head that direction, the outside rein will allow the horse to flex only as much as is appropriate for the tightness of the turn. But, the outisde rein will encourage ther horse to move his shoulders over that direction. The reason he doesn't just fall sideways that way is that your inside leg is moderately firm , asking him to not fall inward, but to bend around the leg, and go forward.

Try riding some squares. Go to the corner and when you make your turn, visualize almost lifting up your horse's shoulders and swinging them onto the new straight line. The lifting happens with the outside rein. I don't mean really lifting, but this is just a visualizing excercize to get you thinking on turning from the outside.
     
    04-25-2012, 07:06 AM
  #5
Yearling
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    04-25-2012, 07:13 AM
  #6
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
the inside rein will ask for the flexion to the inside of the turn and get th horse thinking in that direction. The outside rein, laid against the neck and fairly steady, support the horse , and backs up the suggestion to bend to the left, which is also created by the legs.

The outside rein sets the limit of the bend, which is initiated by the inside. So the inside rein says, "bend this way , or rather flex this way and think this way" and when the horse starts to flex his head that direction, the outside rein will allow the horse to flex only as much as is appropriate for the tightness of the turn. But, the outisde rein will encourage ther horse to move his shoulders over that direction. The reason he doesn't just fall sideways that way is that your inside leg is moderately firm , asking him to not fall inward, but to bend around the leg, and go forward.
Concur 100%

OP, work on suppleness as well to make sure there is nothing in the horse itself that will inhibit flexion.
     
    04-25-2012, 07:26 AM
  #7
Yearling
Great question, OP!

I, TOO, have always had trouble with this concept as I cannot think well "spacially". Rather, to discern how my actions in a given"space" will effect another subject, in this case the horse, that sort of thing.

I think Tiny's explanation is the first that has ever come close to making sense in all of my attempts to look the definition of this and other movement up in books or have an instructor attempt to explain it to me. Things always became too involved and I would get semi-lost.

When I was a young rider (I hate to admit this, but it's true!) I was always doing what I was told to do as best as I could, however, I never "got" how to be sure the HORSE was responding as the trainer expected. When he would do something I could feel was DIFFERENT, I never knew exactly WHAT part of the response the horse gave was the part the trainer was looking for!!

Thanks, Tiny. I'll check back for any other explanations that roll in over time to see if they add even further insight!

(YAH, I completely know my new trainer has a BIG JOB on her hands with me! Ha!)
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    04-25-2012, 07:52 AM
  #8
Banned
I suggest going to youtube

     
    04-25-2012, 09:29 AM
  #9
Yearling
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    04-25-2012, 09:35 AM
  #10
Yearling
I really like that instructor and his calm, patient and thorough way of explaining! He obviously gets that some folks are VISUAL LEARNERS (i.e. The clearly marked circle w/in the square, and the differently colored reins) while others learn via auditory stimuli. Smart dude!!

I, personally, will definitely look into more of these sort of instruction-based videos on you tube. Thanks for the great advice, mildot!

I imagine the OP, too, will find these tidbits helpful! :0)

By the way, I truly apologize to those on the thread that for unknown reasons lately, my not-so-"smart phone" keeps posting twice for each one of my single replies! Arggh.
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