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how long before you showed?

This is a discussion on how long before you showed? within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
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    02-26-2012, 01:42 PM
  #21
Weanling
I think I took lessons for about 3 years before I went to my first show. It is really important to have a good foundation and be comfortable with anything they are going to ask of you in the show ring. Don't be in a rush to show. Besides, you will have more fun if you are confident with yourself and the horse you are riding.
     
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    02-26-2012, 03:38 PM
  #22
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by countercanter    
I think I took lessons for about 3 years before I went to my first show. It is really important to have a good foundation and be comfortable with anything they are going to ask of you in the show ring. Don't be in a rush to show. Besides, you will have more fun if you are confident with yourself and the horse you are riding.
Im not sure what you mean be comfortable with whatever they ask you to do? Our local shows are simple w/t or w/t/c. Nothing major or to fancy. I'll be riding on the flat, I have shown wp a few years ago and it was pretty easy going. Im sure it will take me some time to be able to show english tho, since im afraid I wont post on the correct diagonal, and I was told your not allowed to look down at the horses shoulder when your showing.
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    02-27-2012, 04:29 PM
  #23
Foal
Just to clarify:

Schooling shows are basically 'local' or unrated shows. They're called schooling shows because they're more laid back and they're great places for green riders and green horses to get show experience. (At least in the hunter/jumper shows.) These shows also have lots of lower classes -- leadline, walk only classes, W-T classes, ground poles, cross rails, and usually fences don't go over 3' in height. There will still be some intermediate/advanced classes, but they don't fill up like the lower level classes do. At least not around here.

That being said, I *think* open shows are mixed shows, no? Where they have Western, English, Halter classes? I would think even some of these would be considered schooling shows. I would ask your instructor about these shows and what all they entail. If they are mixed disciplines, you might not have as many (if any) beginner classes to choose from. You should go to a show and watch the classes you'd be interested in showing in.

I posted this over a year ago about the C-B-A/AA ratings in H/J shows. It could explain more, but it's a rough guide:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Opus    
This isn't the do-all, end-all guideline, but roughly:

C Shows: Local barn shows, also called schooling shows. No points earned (unless it's for the hosting barn), but there is a judge, places given, etc. Turn out for horse and rider tends to be more relaxed. Colors are mixed, you'll see some half chaps with paddock boots, maybe some bright schooling helmets. You'll even see riders show in polo shirts only and no jackets. Entry fees/grounds fees/class fees are very reasonable.

B Shows: State/Regionally rated. Riders accumulate points for end of the year awards in whatever organization. Shows are more proper than 'C' shows, but more forgiving than 'A' shows in terms of turnout. (Which probably depends on the organization/area.) Cost is also higher, but not extravagant. Think jackets and tall boots, proper riding colors, horses may or may not be braided.

A Shows: Nationally rated, bigger prize money, but also more fees and higher cost per class involved. Horses and riders are both turned out impeccably. Proper colors, tall boots, black helmets, horses braided, hooves polished, etc.
     
    02-27-2012, 05:46 PM
  #24
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Opus    
Just to clarify:

Schooling shows are basically 'local' or unrated shows. They're called schooling shows because they're more laid back and they're great places for green riders and green horses to get show experience. (At least in the hunter/jumper shows.) These shows also have lots of lower classes -- leadline, walk only classes, W-T classes, ground poles, cross rails, and usually fences don't go over 3' in height. There will still be some intermediate/advanced classes, but they don't fill up like the lower level classes do. At least not around here.

That being said, I *think* open shows are mixed shows, no? Where they have Western, English, Halter classes? I would think even some of these would be considered schooling shows. I would ask your instructor about these shows and what all they entail. If they are mixed disciplines, you might not have as many (if any) beginner classes to choose from. You should go to a show and watch the classes you'd be interested in showing in.

I posted this over a year ago about the C-B-A/AA ratings in H/J shows. It could explain more, but it's a rough guide:
Thanks for the info, yes our open shows are mixed. I haven't been to a show in like 2 years, so I plan on just watching a few first. Does your horse have to be registered for B and A/AA shows? Do certain registries host them, or are they just clubs that host these shows?
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    02-27-2012, 05:59 PM
  #25
Yearling
If you're talking about since the very first time I rode, a few years.

If you're talking about after consistently taking lessons, about a year.

I got a few thirds and a fourth (the fourth was actually a better placing because it was against a lot more people than the thirds were). I didn't place at all in one class, probably because I lost my one stirrup for half of it .

I love shows, they are so much fun!
     
    02-27-2012, 06:26 PM
  #26
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinder    
If you're talking about since the very first time I rode, a few years.

If you're talking about after consistently taking lessons, about a year.

I got a few thirds and a fourth (the fourth was actually a better placing because it was against a lot more people than the thirds were). I didn't place at all in one class, probably because I lost my one stirrup for half of it .

I love shows, they are so much fun!
I find it so interesting how everybody differs so much on when they first started showing. I guess your self confidence in your ability to ride is a major factor.
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    02-27-2012, 07:10 PM
  #27
Yearling
Quote:
I find it so interesting how everybody differs so much on when they first started showing. I guess your self confidence in your ability to ride is a major factor.
That is definitely a huge part of it! Another big factor is finances. Many people would love to show but simply do not have the money.
     
    02-27-2012, 07:32 PM
  #28
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinder    
That is definitely a huge part of it! Another big factor is finances. Many people would love to show but simply do not have the money.
That I can certainly understand, which is why I probably will always just do open shows lol.
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    02-29-2012, 08:47 PM
  #29
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Born2Ride    
Does your horse have to be registered for B and A/AA shows? Do certain registries host them, or are they just clubs that host these shows?
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No, your horse doesn't need to be registered within breed registries. With A/AA shows you may want/need to register your horse via one of the big organizations, like USEF. It's more or less a way to track the horse's performance in competitions, points they earn, etc.

And there *are* all sorts of breed shows, but the ones I'm talking about aren't breed specific at all. In fact, they're open to every single (non-gaited) breed out there. Everything from Drafts to Arabians.

Usually there's smaller hunter/jumper associations you'll see locally, then state associations. And the overall national organizations are USHJA and The United States Equestrian Federation ... Typically, they're all associated with each other.

It all just depends on your area. :)
     
    03-01-2012, 07:19 AM
  #30
Showing
6 months or less of lessons for my horse, 8 for me (she had time off during a winter, so I kept taking lessons on barn horse). Green horse with no professional training + green self-taught rider combination. We started show low level dressage last May and progressed to the next level through the summer. I was hoping to do rated show(s) this year (the only problem all rated shows are quite a bit of driving).
     

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