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Instructor Took Me Off The Horse

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  • Looking for female 18 Likes riding horses And wants to ride me occasionally

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    12-26-2012, 03:41 PM
  #11
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by myw05419    
So, I recently started riding at this new barn and was put on this horse today that was really fresh. I couldn't get him to listen to me, he wouldn't stop when I told him to. I couldn't get the canter down right, I was bouncing around way too much so I trued to stop and start again but that wasn't working. The instructor took me to the end of the ring and told me to get off. He put one of his stable hands on and she continued to ride while I just stood there and watched. This made me feel as if I'm a really bad rider. I got about 20 minutes of riding in... I usually ride for more than an hour. I've never had this happen to me before, I've never been told to get off a horse and not get back on. I didn't even get told why I wasn't allowed to keep on riding and I'm afraid to ask. Usually I get the canter down right away, it's my favorite. I feel awful, as if I can't ride. I bet nobody else has had this happen to them before... This brings my confidence way down and I'm afraid to go back and ride again even if I am given a different horse.
I think that they should definitely explain to you why you got removed and then also tried to make a lesson out of the stable handing riding the horse. What they were doing differently.

I have been taken off a horse once. Although it was for the opposite reason. I could not get the horse to go and she would not do what I asked. The instructor got on herself and then showed me what I needed to do. When I got back on and repeated what she did, the horse went brilliantly :)
     
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    12-29-2012, 03:37 AM
  #12
Weanling
If you paying for a lesson then they should have put you on another horse - don't have an issue with them taking you off - especially for a saftey reason... but to not put you on something else - I would have expected your money back..

My instructor jumps on my horse occasionally - but that's different its my horse and Im getting something out of her riding her, whereas for you you have gone for a lesson on their horse
     
    12-29-2012, 05:30 AM
  #13
Yearling
I never had this happen to me but I do remember once at a barn I had my horse, there was an instructor that should have done this to a student. Instead she let the girl keep going and the girl got thrown into a wall. It isn't worth trying to do something you are not ready to do on a given horse. Rather learn on a horse that is willing and then tackle the next one. There is absolutely nothing embarrassing about taking a step back to move forward, that is the smart thing to do.
     
    12-29-2012, 07:17 AM
  #14
Foal
Chalk it up to a bad day for all involved. I'm glad they pulled you off so you stayed safe, and I have a hunch once you ask your instructor "why" you may be surprised that it wasn't because you're a bad rider.

If it makes you feel any better, a few months ago I hopped on my horse and for the love of god I don't know what happened, but my rear hit the saddle and it was like someone hit an eject button, and boom, my rear was on the ground. My filly stared down at me like "why the hell you down there?". The added bonus was the round of applause from my fellow boarders who saw it all! I explained to my onlookers that I meant to do that (haha), called it a day and we worked on the ground. My point is we've all been there, so get back on and know you're becoming better each time you do.

Good luck!
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    12-29-2012, 07:49 AM
  #15
Trained
Yes, it does happen, and was probably for the best, since it sounds like you were overhorsed that day. I do think you should have been given another mount, but I also think you need to open your mouth and ask questions. Your instructor is not a mind reader. You need to be able to communicate with them in order to learn as much as possible.

I would also say that the instructors walk a fine line with school horses and the horse cannot be allowed to get away with bad behavior. So, while your lessons are to teach you, understand that the horse cannot be allowed to get away with bad behavior, period. If your instructor feels the horse needs correction you may not be capable of, or may react to the correction in a way you cannot deal with, they have a responsibility to put someone on that horse right then who can deal with it. Otherwise, they end up with a spoiled horse who behaves badly when it can get away with it. And some of them will do it at every opportunity.....thus more advanced horses needing more skill to keep them correct. You will get there, but there is nothing to gain by attempting things before you are ready.
     
    12-29-2012, 09:06 AM
  #16
Trained
Wow that does stink, it seems like you need to have a better relationship with your trainer, one where you feel comfortable enough to talk to him openly.

Don't worry, this has probably happened to most people who have taken lessons before ! Good trainers are tough.

I was showing with my trainer back in october and he told me the way I ride my horse I make her go like a shetland pony ! I was shocked ! I don't see my trainer even once per month as he lives in a different state, and 5 weeks later when I saw him I told him I was practicing my dressage so much and I felt really bad about it ! He said that he hadnt even meant it LOL
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    12-29-2012, 09:15 AM
  #17
Weanling
From a liability perspective, if you had been put in danger in any way or injured a fingernail even around this horse, your trainer could have been sued (by your health insurance company, despite your objections). It was a safety issue, regardless of your ability to handle the horse or not - the horse was dangerous, which in most states is a legal reason for a trainer's liability protection to be rendered null.

They should have explained this to you, perhaps. Perhaps also they were concerned about the horse, and not your immediate feelings about the situation.
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    12-30-2012, 01:14 PM
  #18
Foal
I recently had a similar situation. My instructor took me off because she said I was nervous and I was making the horse nervous. I did not feel nervous or scared and I thought the horse was a bit jumpier than usual because it was super windy and and the arena was creaking. I was a bit peeved, mostly due to pride, but I didnt say anything. She started longing (lunging?) the horse and said she might put me back on. About five minutes went by and she asked if I wanted to try again. I said heck yeah, I am going to RIDE that horse. And I did. The horse knew I was in a different mindset, my instructor knew I was in a different mindset, and I had my best five minutes of riding yet .

What I realized is I was so focused on my form and trying to do everything right, I forgot about riding the horse so I really wasn't in control. (I know that sounds weird/counter-intuitive). I think she thought I was nervous/timid, and I was, but of her, not the horse. I've had 2-3 lessons since then and I mentally pick what to work on, because I realized she is not going to prioritize my many riding faults for me, she lets me know about all of them. Interestingly enough, my last two lessons have gone great, and the horse has really listened to me and I get less criticism from her. Because there is less to criticize? I wish! I think it is more that I am riding the horse better which is probably what she was looking for the entire time. Maybe it is a form+function thing and I just hadn't put the two together.

As for the time in the saddle, I am always sad to miss any, but even just watching is learning and horses are unpredictable. I appreciate her being concerned for my safety even if we don't agree on the root cause. I figure she is the much better judge.
     
    12-30-2012, 01:51 PM
  #19
Started
I would talk to your instructor about this and have her explain to you her decision. It shouldn't be a big issue and just explain that you are puzzled and would like to better understand. I also like the suggestions of watching others ride if you can. All opportunity to learn is a good thing.
One thing I have learned is that sometimes it's a good idea to "take one's self" off a horse. Never feel embarrased about getting off if you feel that's the safest thing to do.
     
    12-31-2012, 06:32 PM
  #20
Yearling
Like everyone else is saying, you gotta talk to your instructor. Some instructors are like closed books until you ask the right questions. It's silly when you think about it but I have experienced this a handful of times so I'm not surprised they left you wondering why you were removed from the horse.

Another thing is to not be scared of talking to your instructors. So many times students will have a lesson and not understand something and never say a word, but instead try to interpret what the instructor wants which leads to a huge mess. You gotta give them feedback, whether it's good or bad. That hour you have with them is YOUR chance to pick their brain and build a connection to help make you a better rider. Make the best of it! :)
     

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