Just a few questions.
   

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Just a few questions.

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  • Horse few days a week
  • Should i buy a foal im only 14

 
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    10-23-2012, 06:54 PM
  #1
Foal
Just a few questions.

Hello, I'm new to the fourm. I'm 14, and haven't had a ton of experience riding. I took western lessons for about a year when I was younger, and about four months ago started leasing out a western horse four days a week. It's been great & I love it. However, I know that I won't go anywhere just riding by myself without a trainer or anything. I want to start jumping, but I have no idea where to start. I've asked the lady whose horse I lease and she's going to be talking to a few people she knows. In the mean time, I wanted to ask a few questions. I'm obviously not very experienced and I'll be the first to admit that. Anyway, the horse I lease is amazing and I love him but I just haven't been able to connect with him. I can get him to do what I want, but that's about the only thing I've been able to achieve with him. He is also 17, and has never been ridden english. Should I find a new horse to lease? Should I buy one? I like the idea of getting a horse and learning with it, because at this point I'm only allowed to ride three days a week because of the owner. I'm just not sure and really don't know what to do. Thanks.
     
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    10-23-2012, 07:03 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
Four months of riding a couple of times a week is nothing. It takes a long time to really know your horse, especially if your overall experience wtih horses is still young.

Can you do some trail riding? Can you have someone show you how to free lunge in a round pen? These are things that help build a connection to the horse. Also , sometimes hanging out in the field helps.

HOw do you know you are not connected? What are you expecting to feel?
     
    10-23-2012, 07:10 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
four months of riding a couple of times a week is nothing. It takes a long time to really know your horse, especially if your overall experience wtih horses is still young.

Can you do some trail riding? Can you have someone show you how to free lunge in a round pen? These are things that help build a connection to the horse. Also , sometimes hanging out in the field helps.

HOw do you know you are not connected? What are you expecting to feel?
I've had his owner show me how to free lunge, and have done it quite a bit. I also trail ride a lot, as where he is boarded there are some great trails. I've also spent the weekends just doing ground work and spending time with him. He just seems to have a very strong bond with the woman who owns him, as with anyone else including me he pins his ears quite a bit and it might sound ridiculous but I just don't feel he has any trust with anyone but her. He'll come up to his owner when she arrives, and just seems very bonded to her. Again, I don't want to make the wrong choice and I'm not sure how to begin or if this is even the right horse.
     
    10-23-2012, 08:46 PM
  #4
Foal
I've been thinking, and would the best thing to do probably be to take lessons on the horse I'm leasing now, and then once I want to possibly do shows, etc maybe get my own? I'm just confused as I don't want to just keep riding other people's horses only a few days a week(after i've learned of course) and having to start all over if something comes up and the lease won't work anymore.
     
    10-23-2012, 10:15 PM
  #5
Green Broke
I do not suggest getting your own anytime soon. Take lessons and continue your lease until your trainer feels you are ready/ capable for your own. There is so much to owning a horse and of you rush into it without the right knowledge it can get really discouraging and stressful.
I've leased on and off since I was 13 owned a couple older horses and want to own again but wont be financially capable for awhile.
Just take your time and learn as much as possible.
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    10-23-2012, 11:51 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarrelracingArabian    
I do not suggest getting your own anytime soon. Take lessons and continue your lease until your trainer feels you are ready/ capable for your own. There is so much to owning a horse and of you rush into it without the right knowledge it can get really discouraging and stressful.
I've leased on and off since I was 13 owned a couple older horses and want to own again but wont be financially capable for awhile.
Just take your time and learn as much as possible.
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Does he sound like an OK horse for what I want to do?
     
    10-23-2012, 11:57 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Well for the beginning basics he might be just fine but if you can find a barn with more seasoned english/ jumping horses it might be easier as they will ' tell' on you when you aren't doing something right rather then you trying to teach an old trail horse while you are learning yourself.
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    10-24-2012, 12:01 AM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarrelracingArabian    
Well for the beginning basics he might be just fine but if you can find a barn with more seasoned english/ jumping horses it might be easier as they will ' tell' on you when you aren't doing something right rather then you trying to teach an old trail horse while you are learning yourself.
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Alright, I'll look and see if I can find something. Thank you!
     
    10-24-2012, 12:12 AM
  #9
Green Broke
Your welcome :).
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    10-24-2012, 10:02 AM
  #10
Green Broke
Its never a good idea to "learn new things together". If you don't know how to jump and he doesn't know how to jump, then likely you're not going to do so well. Jumping isn't just about popping over jump. Its about gaining control over stride length, learning how to collect, gain rhythm, holding a contact, and then you might look at going over obstacles. If he hasn't been taught to do these things then that's a whole lot more work. Also make sure you're riding in the correct way - jumping is different from western or dressage or trails. You'd be best to get some lessons on a horse that has been trained to jump.

As far as bonding goes - horses aren't dogs. It's rare that they get very close to people (at least in the way that we understand). To get a good working relationship with a horse I think it takes about a year of consistent (daily or so) work. Four months is a very short time.

Although when leasing horses its often good not to get too attached, as they can be taken away from you at any time. They are not your horse.

You don't seem to have a firm grasp on your plans right now so I wouldn't get a horse. The horse you need now might be very different from the one you want six months from now. Try doing some lessons doing what you want to do on horses that know what they're doing. Then decide if this is the right horse for you.
     

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