Leg Yielding - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 15 Old 10-28-2011, 09:28 PM
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In some sports, a certain head position is considered desirable, although it may be the horse is supposed to want it there. Certainly there are indications that riders will work to place it there, for whatever reason.

But outside an arena, the horse should be looking where it is going, and how far out it needs to look is determined by speed and the condition of the ground - or how far away a jump or cow or something it needs to know about is.

Some horse sports HATE initiative in a horse. Others value it. My point was that when I neck rein, I have no interest in the position of the horse's legs at the time I move the rein. If it is off by 0.5 seconds, so what? The horse understands what WE are doing, and will take care of his side.

From the link I posted:

"The preparatory command explains what the movement will be. Military Training Instructors often call this the thinking command. It allows the individual performing the drill movement to form a mental picture in their mind of the movement that is about to take place."
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post #12 of 15 Old 10-28-2011, 09:31 PM
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Originally Posted by bsms View Post
In some sports, a certain head position is considered desirable, although it may be the horse is supposed to want it there. Certainly there are indications that riders will work to place it there, for whatever reason.

But outside an arena, the horse should be looking where it is going, and how far out it needs to look is determined by speed and the condition of the ground - or how far away a jump or cow or something it needs to know about is.

Some horse sports HATE initiative in a horse. Others value it. My point was that when I neck rein, I have no interest in the position of the horse's legs at the time I move the rein. If it is off by 0.5 seconds, so what? The horse understands what WE are doing, and will take care of his side.

From the link I posted:

"The preparatory command explains what the movement will be. Military Training Instructors often call this the thinking command. It allows the individual performing the drill movement to form a mental picture in their mind of the movement that is about to take place."

Then maybe you can explain to back again how to do a leg yield.
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post #13 of 15 Old 10-28-2011, 09:51 PM
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Then maybe you can explain to back again how to do a leg yield.
back again wrote:

"My last instructor had me que leg yield with my leg behing the girth, but my current instructor says use the leg at the girth, but in a movement towards the outside shoulder to get a leg yield.

I was just wondering if there is a more correct way to ask for it, or if is a matter of how the horse is trained?"


Since the question assumes the horse is trained, then the answer is that it is a matter of how the horse is trained. That is why two instructors gave different answers. And on the lesson horses I've ridden, either will give results.

If you wanted, you could train a horse to do a side pass in response to taps on the wither. It would be a bit odd, but it would work fine once the horse was trained.

With my gelding, if you apply firm pressure with your left leg at the cinch, but don't allow him to turn his head right, he'll move laterally to the right.

Is that 'proper'? Don't know. But he was trained on a ranch, and that is what he does.
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post #14 of 15 Old 10-28-2011, 10:21 PM
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back again wrote:

"My last instructor had me que leg yield with my leg behing the girth, but my current instructor says use the leg at the girth, but in a movement towards the outside shoulder to get a leg yield.

I was just wondering if there is a more correct way to ask for it, or if is a matter of how the horse is trained?"

Since the question assumes the horse is trained, then the answer is that it is a matter of how the horse is trained. That is why two instructors gave different answers. And on the lesson horses I've ridden, either will give results.

If you wanted, you could train a horse to do a side pass in response to taps on the wither. It would be a bit odd, but it would work fine once the horse was trained.

With my gelding, if you apply firm pressure with your left leg at the cinch, but don't allow him to turn his head right, he'll move laterally to the right.

Is that 'proper'? Don't know. But he was trained on a ranch, and that is what he does.
I don't believe that is has to do with how the horse is trained. It has to do with "Is the horse understanding what it is that we are asking?" or "Are we asking the horse correctly?"

We are not talking about neck reining, I have no idea what you are going on about......we are talking about leg yeilding, which has nothing to do with neck reining. I hope you are not trying to compare the two, because if you are, you are way off.

If you want to compare movements to Leg Yeilding, then perhaps look to Turn On The Forehand or a Roll Back. The movement is where you are opening up the inside, keeping the outside shoulder underneith the horse to ensure that they are strait, using your outside aids to encourage the horse to move over. Outside seat bone, outside leg, outside rein. Keeping your inside aids quiet and soft.

With your outside leg, you are using it behind the girth to ask for the movement, but you can also move your leg to the girth or slightly ahead of the girth, to encourage that outside shoulder to remain under the horse. But, that's where the outside rein comes into factor.

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post #15 of 15 Old 10-28-2011, 10:47 PM
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No, I'm not confusing neck reining with a leg yield. But horses respond the way they are trained to respond. They will train faster if the training is linked to what is easiest for them to respond to, but training will still get the result.

A few years ago, out of curiosity, I trained a mare to turn based on pressing my finger into her wither. No one else does that, and she was ridden by several different riders, so I didn't continue very far. But the principle remains. You can train a horse to respond to almost any cue you desire. If you haven't trained the horse, then it helps to know what the horse was trained to respond to.
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