Maintaining a Canter - Page 4
   

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Maintaining a Canter

This is a discussion on Maintaining a Canter within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Maintaining the canter in a round frame
  • Horse and rider in synch ve

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    06-05-2011, 10:04 AM
  #31
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by RideroftheWind    
Thanks for the feedback. But what do you mean by 'my seat is loose'? I'm not really understanding.
Basically you are not in synch with the horse. I realize that you are a hunter rider and therefore do not SIT on the horse but even they will have a quiet seat and will use their calves more. In the canter you seat bounces up and down in the saddle. If you ride dressage that seat stays in the saddle...if you ride hunter then it maintains a quietness with no bouncing.

In the trot the posting looks forced.

Quote:
Also, another thing about your critique did not make sense to me. In the second paragraph you told me that I shouldn't use my reins as much. In the third paragraph you told me I should use them more. I though the rider has to have only slight signals, to keep them invisible...
In the trot video on the first minuet the rein was on then off then on then off. In the corner you had the horse looking to the outside and it went crooked because at that critical moment of cornering you had the reins dropped and the horse was unsupported.

The part I referred to with you using the rein too much was in reference to the picture. You simply pulled the horse to make a turn. This is called a direct rein and used when the horse does not understand the riders aids to move off the leg. It is also used by beginner riders as they also don't know leg aids yet.

Quote:
Another thing is, I've heard that an experienced rider can sit on the horse and not look like they're doing anything, but still have complete control. Though I'm not sure that's the case with me, I know that it would be nearly impossible to simply be a 'passenger' on that horse. She tends to either be slow, lazy and stubborn or acting like an excited racehorse. Finding a happy medium is the job of the rider, and it's not an easy one. (You can tell that she's paying attention to the rider if you look at her ears. One of them is always flicked back and listening to me.)

I'm not saying that your critique was wrong, I just don't really understand. Please explain? Thanks.
Nice to have the horse flick their ears back at you but unfortunately you need to rider more than the ears. Nowhere an any of the videos did I see a horse either round or balanced. Nowhere did I see a horse that either accepted the bit or worked with it to listen to any aid you may have given.
Contrary to what tiny said this in not a hunter frame as nowhere did I see a nice long frame with a relaxed hunter stride, but rather an inverted one with no real acceptance of the bit and short strides that would not garnish any ribbons in a hunter class unless all the horses beng judged were school horses.

What I did see is a typical school horse that is used to doing things and doing them simply because "that is what it does". The other horse in the arena is doing the exact same thing.

I would expect to see exactly this if I went to watch a lesson on the barn's school horses.

Horses like these are actually in high demand as they help the rider gain confidence and those riders that are willing to make a huge leap to an privately owned horse will get a confidence boost to do so.
     
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    06-05-2011, 04:11 PM
  #32
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder    
Basically you are not in synch with the horse. I realize that you are a hunter rider and therefore do not SIT on the horse but even they will have a quiet seat and will use their calves more. In the canter you seat bounces up and down in the saddle. If you ride dressage that seat stays in the saddle...if you ride hunter then it maintains a quietness with no bouncing.

In the trot the posting looks forced.

In the trot video on the first minuet the rein was on then off then on then off. In the corner you had the horse looking to the outside and it went crooked because at that critical moment of cornering you had the reins dropped and the horse was unsupported.

The part I referred to with you using the r
picture. You simply pulled the horse to make a turn. This is called a direct rein and used when the horse does not understand the riders aids to move off the leg. It is also used by beginner riders as they also don't know leg aids yet.

Nice to have the horse flick their ears back at you but unfortunately you need to rider more than the ears. Nowhere an any of the videos did I see a horse either round or balanced. Nowhere did I see a horse that either accepted the bit or worked with it to listen to any aid you may have given.
Contrary to what tiny said this in not a hunter frame as nowhere did I see a nice long frame with a relaxed hunter stride, but rather an inverted one with no real acceptance of the bit and short strides that would not garnish any ribbons in a hunter class unless all the horses beng judged were school horses.

What I did see is a typical school horse that is used to doing things and doing them simply because "that is what it does". The other horse in the arena is doing the exact same thing.

I would expect to see exactly this if I went to watch a lesson on the barn's school horses.

Horses like these are actually in high demand as they help the rider gain confidence and those riders that are willing to make a huge leap to an privately owned horse will get a confidence boost to do so.
Fair enough. The only thing is, when I was cantering, my seat was only lifting a couple inches out of the saddle. I wasn't thumping on the horse's back either. I don't know if it looks like that in the video, but as the rider I know I can feel how hard I land on the horse's back and I was not thumping. So I don't know what you mean by bouncing.

Also, you told me what I was doing wrong but you never told me how to fix it. Need I remind you, good critique includes feedback on what the rider is doing correctly, what the rider is doing incorrectly, and how to fix what is incorrect. Though I'm sure you didn't mean it that way, your replies to my pictures and videos came off more as an insult than helpful advice. For example, saying 'your posting seems forced' but not telling me how it does or how to fix it makes it seem like you're just insulting me. That's only one example, but I'm not going to list things.

Of course, I'm very sure that you weren't trying to be rude or hurtful. I'm probably just taking it the wrong way, I'll admit that. But all the same, your reply did make me feel quite bad about myself. I don't want to start a fight, and so I am attempting to state my opinion in a respectful and mature way way. In return, I ask that you do the same. (not that you arent already) All I can ask is that if you wish to tell me what I'm doing wrong, please give me advice on how I can fix it and improve.
     
    06-05-2011, 04:19 PM
  #33
Foal
Oh and also, I recently entered a hunter show. The horses were not all schooling horses. I got second place. (/\)
     
    06-05-2011, 04:53 PM
  #34
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by RideroftheWind    
Fair enough. The only thing is, when I was cantering, my seat was only lifting a couple inches out of the saddle. I wasn't thumping on the horse's back either. I don't know if it looks like that in the video, but as the rider I know I can feel how hard I land on the horse's back and I was not thumping. So I don't know what you mean by bouncing.

Also, you told me what I was doing wrong but you never told me how to fix it. Need I remind you, good critique includes feedback on what the rider is doing correctly, what the rider is doing incorrectly, and how to fix what is incorrect. Though I'm sure you didn't mean it that way, your replies to my pictures and videos came off more as an insult than helpful advice. For example, saying 'your posting seems forced' but not telling me how it does or how to fix it makes it seem like you're just insulting me. That's only one example, but I'm not going to list things.

Of course, I'm very sure that you weren't trying to be rude or hurtful. I'm probably just taking it the wrong way, I'll admit that. But all the same, your reply did make me feel quite bad about myself. I don't want to start a fight, and so I am attempting to state my opinion in a respectful and mature way way. In return, I ask that you do the same. (not that you arent already) All I can ask is that if you wish to tell me what I'm doing wrong, please give me advice on how I can fix it and improve.

You have a coach I assume you pay good money for so I suggest you look to them for advice.

Good for you on your second place.
     
    06-05-2011, 06:01 PM
  #35
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder    
You have a coach I assume you pay good money for so I suggest you look to them for advice.

Good for you on your second place.
Doesn't that kind of defeat the purpose of critiquing? O.o
     
    06-06-2011, 12:27 AM
  #36
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
I think that is a rather harsh assessment . It's hard to see much detail in the videos, such as your hands or whether your leg is on or not.

I see a fairly nicely balanced hunter rider and a very nice school horse. I dont' see any obvious rider behaviors that I would say are clearly why the pony won't sustain a canter. She may not be actively affecting the horse at all times, but she certainly isn't interfering with it at all.
I see what Spyder saw.

There are quite a few things I saw that I can point out, but I wont - why bother.

~~~

To the OP, I think you need to have a good discussion with your Coach, and discuss about taking dressage lessons. Improve and solidify that lower leg, your seat, and your core.

You want to know how to keep the horse cantering, I will just re-emphasize what you've already been told - Either take a crop and spur with you, or learn how to use your seat and your lower legs.

Again, sit down and discuss this with your coach. All the best to you.
     
    06-06-2011, 05:51 AM
  #37
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIEventer    
I see what Spyder saw.

There are quite a few things I saw that I can point out, but I wont - why bother.

~~~

To the OP, I think you need to have a good discussion with your Coach, and discuss about taking dressage lessons. Improve and solidify that lower leg, your seat, and your core.

You want to know how to keep the horse cantering, I will just re-emphasize what you've already been told - Either take a crop and spur with you, or learn how to use your seat and your lower legs.

Again, sit down and discuss this with your coach. All the best to you.
I am going to discuss it with my coach, but she is only one person. It'll be a while before I get to see her again anyways. So I'd love to hear from you in the mean time.

I apologize - maybe it is coming off like I simply don't want to listen to any advice. Or at least, that's all everyone thinks of me now. But you have to understand, that's really not what I intended. Honestly, the only thing I don't want to hear is people telling me to use a crop and spurs, and I've stated that from the very beginning in the original post. I do want to hear your critique. But I also want to know how to fix what I'm doing wrong. Otherwise asking for critique is pretty much pointless.

Yes, I told Spyder I didnt understand a bunch of thigs, and he (or she) explained them to me. I can't argue. There was still one thing about my canter that Spyder said that I still didn't understand, and I'm still open to explanations. But to become a better rider I have to learn from my mistakes. Just listing off everything I'm doing wrong and leaving it at that doesn't help me do that.

Again, I apologize if I set that kind of image for myself. I do hear what you want to say. I might need to clarify some things, but I still want to hear it.
     
    06-06-2011, 06:05 AM
  #38
Foal
I'm actually really sorry, and this is to everyone. I didn't think that saying what I said would make such a big impact. I was just stating my opinion, but maybe I did that the wrong way. Right now I've been trying to undo everything, but you can probably tell that's not working so well in my favor. I do want to hear what people have to say. I've been on this forum for quite a while and this never happened. I guess it was all just one wrong thread and it all fell apart. I never intended for this to happen, and I'm going to stop it right here. So say what you want to say and I'll shut up and listen, even if I don't agree. Because I'd rather listen to things I don't agree with than have everyone here dislike me.
     
    06-06-2011, 12:01 PM
  #39
Trained
No one here dislikes you, frustrated perhaps, but not dislike. I applaud you for asking your questions, and I applaud you for taking that one step forward in posting pics and vids.

Lookit - don't get me wrong, I'm no perfect rider either. I have holes in my training, but it takes a rider to admit their faults, before they can progress forward and improve. As my Coach says - "why work on what you already know, and work on what you don't?" or "Why work on what you can do, and work on what you can't".

But - before you can do that, you have to know what it is. You can't fix what you don't know is wrong.

So, tell me, what is it that you see in your video's, that you can improve on, what you are lacking, and what you need to fix. Let's take that step first, and then we can help you as best as we can, so that you can take the information, and approach your coach with it, and ask her "why haven't you targeted this?"

The issues I have with some lesson barns, not all - there are some pretty darn tootin' amazing barns out there, are that Coaches say "good job, great, that was nice, ok, next" instead of targeting the holes in their students riding skills, to help their students grow, and improve and learn.

So yes, you do need to talk to your parents, you need to shed light in the situation, and then you need to sit down with your coach, and discuss the needed steps to take, to help you grow, mature and improve.
     

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