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My beef with dressage

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  • My beef with dressage

 
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    01-12-2009, 01:20 PM
  #11
Super Moderator
While I have never heard of hotwiring a horse to get the piaffe, I don't doubt that it has been done. I think if you look hard enough into any and all riding methods, you'll find some bad. EVERYWHERE. There are always cheaters in this world that will go to abusive lengths to get what they want.

The OP doesn't say anywhere that all dressage riders use abusive training techniques so please do not attack, They've left the door wide open for a really great debate so let's stay on topic.

I do not agree with the statement that dressage horses are "the most trained" or talented horses. There are so many horses that are trained in so many ways, western reiners, western pleasure, dressage, even some of the higher level jumpers have some pretty extensive training.

As for dressage, it's pretty impressive to watch, it isn't easy to do, the rider has to have a really good understanding of what they are doing. I agree it has really changed over the years. We keep asking more and more of our horses and really forcing them to pull all of their talents together.

What are you riding now Ponyboy?
     
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    01-12-2009, 01:40 PM
  #12
Yearling
I agree with what most of the above posters have said, but I would also like to point out that all movements in dressage occur naturally. Whether it is a stallion prancing in place to show off to a brood of mares, or colts in a field doing lead changes, none of the movements are unnatural, what happens in dressage is that the horse learns to do them on cue and while having a rider on its back, which is where the true balance comes in.
     
    01-12-2009, 02:24 PM
  #13
Foal
I agree with Strange: all these movements are natural. Dressage is dancing. And very much horses love it. If they would really hate it, they wouldnīt do it.
Of course there are the extreme riders but - as said before - they are in all disciplines and you canīt accuse dressage as being bad. Blame the riders not the discipline! I ride dressage myself. I love it, my horse also and I use neither spurs nor rollkur nor hot wire or something else. Dressage is harmony and you wouldnīt achieve harmony by pain.
     
    01-12-2009, 02:41 PM
  #14
Showing
Once again, please do NOT lump all dressage riders together. There are many types and thoughts and methods... we don't all get along.
     
    01-12-2009, 03:33 PM
  #15
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
Once again, please do NOT lump all dressage riders together. There are many types and thoughts and methods... we don't all get along.
yeh I agree, there is much cruelty in the world for example, but just because one person beats,neglects and abuses their horse doesn't mean the rest of us do. So please DON'T stereotype.

I do agree with your idea that some dressage riders are developing new ways to train the horse quicker, to make more money.

And as for the breeds that have done dressage the longest are the best at dressage I don't totally agree. I thought it would be more down to the conformation of the individual horse.

Off topic but I do think the spanish riding school is pretty amazing.
     
    01-12-2009, 09:46 PM
  #16
Yearling
Let's see if I can quickly address some comments.

Yes, every discipline has its issues. The problem is not many people are talking about the issues in dressage, and dressage has always billed itself as being a gentle discipline. Jumping is about clearing fences... Jumpers don't claim it's anything more special than that. That's not the case with dressage.

Yes all dressage movements are natural, but not in the context or for the length of time that we ask a horse to do them.

Somebody mentioned natural ability in relation to willingness. I totally agree that temperament counts for a lot. Jumpers have a history of not bothering to breed for temperament and I think that's a shame.

What am I riding right now? I haven't ridden since last June and I'll be lucky if I can afford to ride again within the next five years. I used to mostly jump but not competitively. I also did dressage up to the level of flying changes, shoulder-in, half-pass, and a little bit of working walk/trot.
     
    01-12-2009, 09:55 PM
  #17
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by ponyboy    
Yes, every discipline has its issues. The problem is not many people are talking about the issues in dressage, and dressage has always billed itself as being a gentle discipline. Jumping is about clearing fences... Jumpers don't claim it's anything more special than that. That's not the case with dressage.
You obviously have never been to the Ultimate Dressage site or Chronicle of the horse site. Be prepared to argue dressage to the point of watching videos with microscopes. Just beware of the denizens that lurk there.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ponyboy    
What am I riding right now? I haven't ridden since last June and I'll be lucky if I can afford to ride again within the next five years. I used to mostly jump but not competitively. I also did dressage up to the level of flying changes, shoulder-in, half-pass, and a little bit of working walk/trot.
Hmmmmm the above movements range from training to level 3.....do you know what level you were riding?
     
    01-12-2009, 09:58 PM
  #18
Showing
I strongly stand by the comment that "all jumpers are dressage horses, but not all dressage horses are jumpers."
Dressage is an essential basis to most good riding.
Jumping is SO much more than just "point and shoot."
     
    01-12-2009, 10:06 PM
  #19
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
I strongly stand by the comment that "all jumpers are dressage horses, but not all dressage horses are jumpers."
Dressage is an essential basis to most good riding.
Jumping is SO much more than just "point and shoot."

I whole heartedly agree!!! I see western riders practicing low level dressage to get their horses able to do w/e it is they do.

Jumpers are way more than just clearing the fences, if you don't have a horse that can flex and bend/balance itself then the horse could not make tight turns or stand on all 4 feet to jump after that tight turn. Also they have to be able to switch leads quickly and sooo much more!! I hate when people claim Jumpers are easy and not difficult, I think jumping/ cross country are two of the most intimidating disciplines..... just my 2 cents....
     
    01-12-2009, 10:06 PM
  #20
Yearling
K, all the people who ride dressage and such opinions are biased.

:)
     

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