My Rant of Frustration >:( - Page 3
 
 

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My Rant of Frustration >:(

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    05-12-2010, 09:36 PM
  #21
Foal
Woot woot! I had THE MOST amazing lesson today!!! Lucky listened like a little angel, we did the courses per-fect-ly, and even my instructor said I'm improving a lot! I think I'm back on track!
Skyseternalangel likes this.
     
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    05-14-2010, 11:02 AM
  #22
Foal
Attagirl, see? The three P's -- patience, persistence, positive thoughts pay off. Keep it up!!
     
    05-14-2010, 03:49 PM
  #23
Foal
Yay! I'm proud of you! Just keep working and you'll keep getting better
     
    08-13-2015, 10:51 AM
  #24
Foal
Thank you!

I am so glad to have read your post regardless of it being 1917 days old. I am 2 years riding and feeling this same exact way right now.
     
    08-13-2015, 12:18 PM
  #25
Trained
I'm glad that your last lesson was a success!!
Forasmuch as we ride the horse so that he/she takes over on "cruise control" most of the time, we need to ride the entire course. The best example I gave my students was to ride like you drive a car. You stay in your lane (track), you keep your foot on the accelerator (squeeze with your calves when necessary and keep contact) and adjust your speed (upward and lower transitions.) When you drive you have to keep feeding gas to the engine through a turn or you will not finish it. You keep your leg on your horse and drive into the turns and they will remain fluid.
You ride TO a jump like you drive up a hill, keeping your accelerator pushed, then releasing right before you crest the hill, so you do NOT interfere with the horse once he/she commits to the jump.
This is why you ALWAYS hear that you should Dressage your horse before you jump. It's all about transitions.
If you could practice, it should be laying out poles instead of jumps, and riding the course as many different ways as possible, including riding the partial course when you do not "jump" some of them. You should, at practice, work on your correct and perfectly straight approach, and ride the "pole course" at the walk, and the trot, and at the canter.
A good Hunter can jump a cross rail and small verticals from the walk, and certainly from the trot. YOU need to be aware of this, in case your instructor has had you jumping exclusively at the canter.
I've been repeating this all year, BUT, firm up your seat by walking cool every time without stirrups. It is, IMHO, the very best time to work on developing a deep seat bc you are already tired and will NOT push yourself out of the saddle as you might at the beginning of a lesson. It will also teach you to loosen up your core and follow the motion of the horse, which is exaggerated at the walk. I also believe that this is the best way to prepare anybody to ride the canter the first time. As we know, MANY good Hunters and Jumpers have BIIIIIGGGGG trots and BIIIIIIIGGGG canters, like a ship at sea. (Of course, you will ask permission, if this is in a lesson on a school horse.)
When you are in 2-point correctly, you are really in a half seat, where you balance where you grip, and assist by sinking weight in your stirrups. Top notch Jumpers (riders) can drop their stirrups and jump a simple Hunter course and they will be in 2 point over the jumps.
Good luck and enjoy your lessons! I know that I did. =b
     
    08-13-2015, 12:35 PM
  #26
Yearling
There is a progression of learning: unconscious incompetence, conscious incompetence, conscious competence, and unconscious competence.

So now you notices what is missing, you have to learn to prevent it from happening I the first place. Act BEFORE the problem. Learn how to pulse aids, to rebalance a horse. His REACTIONS are CAUSED by OUR ACTIONS. 99% of errors are ours, never the horses.

But to change, it's like eating an elephant. One bit at a time. It is NOT difficult to change, it is work to REPLACE a behavior. And is it NEVER the horse's fault, it simply part of learning. If you position o.f. Is problematic, what are you going to do? Can you ride two point in all gaits w/o holding on? Post w/o stirrups? Do two point w/o stirrups? Are you working on getting your toes more forward? Have you do a LOT of caveletti to an X???

If you are swerving/cutting corners, ask why. Are you positioning before them, riding straight toward the horse and then using a proper rein effect.

Likely you are clamping with my legs or pulling at the bit during jumps, them imho work on improving your work on the flat with the above work. The good news it that you are now EDUCATED ENOUGH to NOTICE your ERRORS. A big step.

"I know that horses are truly the most amazing animals in the world to be able to put up with their riders, because if I were a horse I would've trampled them already!!!!!!!!" So true, at it occurs at even the top levels!
     
    08-13-2015, 12:38 PM
  #27
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by equitate    
There is a progression of learning: unconscious incompetence, conscious incompetence, conscious competence, and unconscious competence.

So now you notices what is missing, you have to learn to prevent it from happening I the first place. Act BEFORE the problem. Learn how to pulse aids, to rebalance a horse. His REACTIONS are CAUSED by OUR ACTIONS. 99% of errors are ours, never the horses.

But to change, it's like eating an elephant. One bit at a time. It is NOT difficult to change, it is work to REPLACE a behavior. And is it NEVER the horse's fault, it simply part of learning. If you position o.f. Is problematic, what are you going to do? Can you ride two point in all gaits w/o holding on? Post w/o stirrups? Do two point w/o stirrups? Are you working on getting your toes more forward? Have you do a LOT of caveletti to an X???

If you are swerving/cutting corners, ask why. Are you positioning before them, riding straight toward the horse and then using a proper rein effect.

Likely you are clamping with my legs or pulling at the bit during jumps, them imho work on improving your work on the flat with the above work. The good news it that you are now EDUCATED ENOUGH to NOTICE your ERRORS. A big step.

"I know that horses are truly the most amazing animals in the world to be able to put up with their riders, because if I were a horse I would've trampled them already!!!!!!!!" So true, at it occurs at even the top levels!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal    
I'm glad that your last lesson was a success!!
Forasmuch as we ride the horse so that he/she takes over on "cruise control" most of the time, we need to ride the entire course. The best example I gave my students was to ride like you drive a car. You stay in your lane (track), you keep your foot on the accelerator (squeeze with your calves when necessary and keep contact) and adjust your speed (upward and lower transitions.) When you drive you have to keep feeding gas to the engine through a turn or you will not finish it. You keep your leg on your horse and drive into the turns and they will remain fluid.
You ride TO a jump like you drive up a hill, keeping your accelerator pushed, then releasing right before you crest the hill, so you do NOT interfere with the horse once he/she commits to the jump.
This is why you ALWAYS hear that you should Dressage your horse before you jump. It's all about transitions.
If you could practice, it should be laying out poles instead of jumps, and riding the course as many different ways as possible, including riding the partial course when you do not "jump" some of them. You should, at practice, work on your correct and perfectly straight approach, and ride the "pole course" at the walk, and the trot, and at the canter.
A good Hunter can jump a cross rail and small verticals from the walk, and certainly from the trot. YOU need to be aware of this, in case your instructor has had you jumping exclusively at the canter.
I've been repeating this all year, BUT, firm up your seat by walking cool every time without stirrups. It is, IMHO, the very best time to work on developing a deep seat bc you are already tired and will NOT push yourself out of the saddle as you might at the beginning of a lesson. It will also teach you to loosen up your core and follow the motion of the horse, which is exaggerated at the walk. I also believe that this is the best way to prepare anybody to ride the canter the first time. As we know, MANY good Hunters and Jumpers have BIIIIIGGGGG trots and BIIIIIIIGGGG canters, like a ship at sea. (Of course, you will ask permission, if this is in a lesson on a school horse.)
When you are in 2-point correctly, you are really in a half seat, where you balance where you grip, and assist by sinking weight in your stirrups. Top notch Jumpers (riders) can drop their stirrups and jump a simple Hunter course and they will be in 2 point over the jumps.
Good luck and enjoy your lessons! I know that I did. =b
Not sure if you're aware but this post is from 2010 but good advice I learnt something :)
     
    08-15-2015, 10:11 PM
  #28
Foal
Glad your lesson was better:)
     



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