Need Suggestions About Better Legs and Seat Please
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding

Need Suggestions About Better Legs and Seat Please

This is a discussion on Need Suggestions About Better Legs and Seat Please within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Ke riding lessons, and I'm relativley far along, but I can't seem to get the

Like Tree1Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-13-2013, 11:02 PM
  #1
Yearling
Need Suggestions About Better Legs and Seat Please

Hi guys,
I'm really having a lot of problems with my seat and legs when riding lately. I have an equitation style saddle with no knee rolls on it. I heard that these saddles were good for teaching yourself not to grip with your knees, etc etc. I am having the darndest time trying to keep my legs in position. I've been struggling anyway. My legs always slip forward into a chair seat, and I can't ever seem to get them back! And I always feel like I'm on my toes and that my heels aren't down, and my legs feel like they slide around a lot. To be honest, I feel like I have a really insecure seat. I feel like I have no grip. Can someone give me some suggestions to fix this problem? It's really affecting my riding.

ALSO, I'm struggling at the canter with my body. My instructor says I need to quit using my entire body to follow the horse's motion and just use my arms. But I can't seem to figure out how to do that!

AND, my two-point is getting ridiculous. I always want to jump ahead of the motion, and I never can trust myself to sit back in the middle of a line. It's like I can't give a release either. If I release, my entire body goes with. Otherwise, I don't release, and then my horse understandably starts getting grumpy.

I want a more secure seat. The end.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-14-2013, 12:21 PM
  #2
Weanling
What happens if you ride without stirrups?
     
    06-14-2013, 02:28 PM
  #3
Super Moderator
Sounds like not enough core strength to me. Ask me how I know!
     
    06-14-2013, 03:17 PM
  #4
Yearling
If I ride without stirrups, which I do at the posting trot sometimes, my thighs tend to hurt quite a bit. After I pick my stirrups back up, I feel more secure, but still in a chair seat.

TinyLiny, I'm guessing you've had the same problems! What exercises do you recommend to get more core. I don't have the greatest abs...
     
    06-14-2013, 03:22 PM
  #5
Super Moderator
I'll be honest with you, I am a very lazy person. I hardly do what I should, so I am not example of the correct. What I do do is make sure that I am standing correctly, with my core muscles engaged. I mean, whenever I walk or stand, just anywhere, I think of engaging those low muscles that are kind of around your kidneys, and under your abdomen, on each side of the belly button. The trick is to learn how to keep them softly engage, and still breathe!


I don't have any cool advice, I only know that when I have trouble with stability, and I do a lot when riding the 17hh Irish sport horse, it's probably due to me not having and using enough core strength.
     
    06-14-2013, 03:37 PM
  #6
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corazon Lock    
ALSO, I'm struggling at the canter with my body. My instructor says I need to quit using my entire body to follow the horse's motion and just use my arms. But I can't seem to figure out how to do that!

AND, my two-point is getting ridiculous. I always want to jump ahead of the motion, and I never can trust myself to sit back in the middle of a line. It's like I can't give a release either. If I release, my entire body goes with. Otherwise, I don't release, and then my horse understandably starts getting grumpy.

I want a more secure seat. The end.

Ok, I have a HUGE problem when instructors say "follow the horse's motion." The only time when you should be following the horse's motion is when the horse spook and you do the "rag doll" approach. All other times, you should be moving with the horse, if not just ever so slightly ahead of the horse's movement. How can you encourage the horse if you are behind its motion? You can't.

I agree with riding without stirrups. It makes your balance yourself properly and builds your strength. If you're tense or not sitting correctly, you can easily fall. Push your weight into your legs and engage your core muslces. And its a good thing if you're sore and hurt the next day. It makes you were doing it right and will get stronger.
     
    06-14-2013, 04:30 PM
  #7
Foal
Here's a great rider fitness challenge focused building strength for riding.
Velvet Rider June Fitness Challenge | Velvet Rider

Stronger legs and core will help you immensely!
     
    06-14-2013, 07:23 PM
  #8
Weanling
No stirrup work is the simplest way to improve your seat, balance, and legs. How safe is the horse you are riding? The reason I ask, is because you can also tie your stirrups to the girth to keep your legs stationary. This has some safety risks obviously. If the horse is a pretty darn safe horse though, doing this for a few lessons can help your leg muscles retain a muscle memory of the correct position.
     
    06-14-2013, 07:49 PM
  #9
Trained
In regards to your saddle. A saddle with no knees rolls is good for a rider who has already developed a good, strong seat. If you have not reached that point, I suggest you find yourself a Dressage saddle with a relatively deep seat and medium knee rolls.
Think of the support this will give you in terms if a kid riding a two wheeler bike for the first time. If you throw then on and say 'away you go', they usually fall off time and time again. If you hold onto a handle bar or seat and run along beside them for a few metres to steady the bike and get the kid balanced, they have a much greater chance of success and it won't take long until they can get started without assistance.
If you ride in a saddle that offers some support, you will develop balance and thus core stability much faster than if you are constantly fighting with the saddle.

If you feel like you are on your toes, put your stirrups up a few holes until you feel secure and balanced enough to drop your leg and sink down into your heel. Then you can start to lower the stirrups gradually. This will also help with the gripping knees.

I think you would do well to invest in a string of lunge lessons on a schoolmaster. You need to do a lot of work on core stability, as Tiny mentioned, and lunging exercises will greatly help this.
I do a lot of outside fitness from riding - lots if running and weights to improve my balance and performance in the saddle. Try doing as many crunches as you possibly can, have a 30 second rest, then do as many as you can, 25 second rest and do on until you can't physically get your shoulders off the ground anymore. Make that part of your daily routine and you will be amazed at how quickly you will develop some good core strength.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    06-14-2013, 07:50 PM
  #10
Green Broke
I find that if you ride without stirrups your legs should drop to wear they should be - in line with the rest of you. But you're not finding this is helping. I'd consider the saddle you're using. If its not the right fit for you then you might find that the bars are too far forward which encourages your leg in the that position. I'm not familiar with an equitation saddle, do you have the option of just riding in a dressage saddle?

Saddles effect the way we ride so much, and people are often really quick to over look it.

Otherwise, while you're riding ride where your leg should be not where the stirrup is - if you lose the stirrup, so what? Practice your two point at the trot, you'll have to be balanced through your leg to maintain that, and if it's thrown forward you should notice.
freia likes this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Suggestions for a "Seat Saver" for a Man MuGGzy Horse Tack and Equipment 8 05-15-2012 12:57 PM
Using your legs and seat properly Lonannuniel Dressage 12 08-05-2011 07:07 PM
suggestions or insights on half-seat? serafina English Riding 8 05-27-2011 04:10 PM
Steering with Legs/Seat Ne0n Zero Horse Training 8 02-19-2010 03:08 PM
Floppy Legs = Good Seat Spastic_Dove Dressage 10 10-01-2009 12:44 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0