New insructor, new stirrup-less advice HELP! - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding

New insructor, new stirrup-less advice HELP!

This is a discussion on New insructor, new stirrup-less advice HELP! within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Bechtolsheimer Laura
  • Legs not touching horses sides

Like Tree7Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    11-26-2011, 12:38 PM
  #11
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsandhorses    

Now I ride without stirrups a few times per week. Riding once per week probably isn't enough to really strenthen your legs no matter what exercises you do in the saddle. Using an exercise ball is a great idea for non-riding days!
What specifically do you do with your exercise ball? The winter is upon us and riding time will be restricted so anything to keep the riding muscles working will help
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    11-27-2011, 06:12 AM
  #12
Foal
Sit on it to watch TV! Lol.

There's a whole host of things. At first it was just a challenge to sit on it without my feet touching the floor, then I got to the point where I could 'bounce' on it - as if doing sitting trot - again without touching the floor. They can be used for other physical exercises too like back stretches, leg raises, push-ups, but you'd need to look for proper instructions for how to do any of those so you don't pull any muscles or injure yourself. Personally I felt it was money very well spent.
Corporal likes this.
     
    11-29-2011, 11:27 AM
  #13
Trained
ANY inside exercises for your legs will help your riding. I like a lot of the suggestions on this post. I think that novice riders see pics in books and online of the "perfect" leg position, which has the booted foot, flexed, and in a stirrup. ACTUALLY, the perfect leg position looks more like an Native American in a Remington bronze, with a long leg and toe loosely pointed down towards the ground. THIS is what your leg will look like if you drop your stirrups and ride at the walk.
Since winter is upon us, and many of us do NOT have a cozy indoor riding arena with dry footing, so we must ground train (even in horse's stalls, which I do!!) or watch the bad weather slop our outside arenas, I recommend signing up for an adult ballet or tap class this winter. No riders seem to pay an attention to the lowly ankle. A strong ankle is the basis for a strong leg. (Ballet dancers are not allowed on pointe until they can perform every exercise on demi-pointe--you do this when you reach for something on a high shelf.) Plus, strong glut's prevent you from placing your weight unnecessarily on your joints, and dance lessons will teach you strengthen them, too.
Dancers work their legs possibily more than any other athletes do.
If you take lessons starting in January, you'll go into the 2012 show season in really good physical shape. =D
     
    12-06-2011, 01:55 PM
  #14
Foal
Thanks, everybody.
     
    12-06-2011, 03:31 PM
  #15
Foal
Balance is what keeps you on the horse, not leg strength or gripping.

Try this: at the walk, take a deep breath in, then breath out, allow your shoulders to drop, lean backwards, slump in your saddle, then allow your head to bobble with the movement of the horse. (like those bobble dolls you see in the back of car windows, Bobbleheads, they call them.)

Did you notice a change in your horse's walk? Did it slow down or stop?

Essentially, you dropped your weight from your shoulders to your butt in the saddle, securing your balance and also indicating to your horse to slow down or stop.

Ok, now if the horse stopped, you'll have to apply leg and ask for it to go forward again. Stay relaxed as above, creating energy with your legs with a squeeze/release asking the horse to walk. Now ask for the trot, only a few strides at a time. Bobble your head, it will help you find the rhythm of the trot. The second you feel unbalanced and want to grip, come back to walk. Keep repeating the walk/trot, walk/trot, procedure staying relaxed. As you gain confidence and balance, see if you can trot a couple more strides extra. Keep adding more strides, and pretty soon, you may make it all the way around the arena one time. Do not try circles or turns until you can sit the trot comfortably on the rail. This might be done in one session or it may take you several sessions to master it.

You must lean back to catch the foreward motion of the trot. If you are already foreward, the trot will throw you foreward more and then you'll want to grip to catch yourself. Then it will all fall apart.

Lean back further than you think you need to. It may feel awkward at first, but you will find it easier to catch the rhythm. Bobbling your head is just an exercise to help you find that rhythm.

Many people have to force their head to bobble because they are so tight in their shoulders and neck. Some people it comes to them naturally. If you are one that has to force the head bobble, try tucking your chin to your chest for a few seconds, then allow it to release and bobble with the motion of the horse. Others have to nearly look at the ceiling or roof of the arena for several moments and then release it and can then bobble their heads.

Some people think of it as a head nodding. Nodding their head quickly as if to say yes to something. The faster the horse walks or trots, the faster your head will nod or bobble.

Practice it at walk, try at trot a few strides. Keep doing it and you'll eventually figure it out. DO NOT GRIP, it will "pop" you out of the saddle and you'll lose your balance.

Good luck, hope this helps.
     
    12-06-2011, 03:41 PM
  #16
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal    
ANY inside exercises for your legs will help your riding. I like a lot of the suggestions on this post. I think that novice riders see pics in books and online of the "perfect" leg position, which has the booted foot, flexed, and in a stirrup. ACTUALLY, the perfect leg position looks more like an Native American in a Remington bronze, with a long leg and toe loosely pointed down towards the ground. THIS is what your leg will look like if you drop your stirrups and ride at the walk.
Since winter is upon us, and many of us do NOT have a cozy indoor riding arena with dry footing, so we must ground train (even in horse's stalls, which I do!!) or watch the bad weather slop our outside arenas, I recommend signing up for an adult ballet or tap class this winter. No riders seem to pay an attention to the lowly ankle. A strong ankle is the basis for a strong leg. (Ballet dancers are not allowed on pointe until they can perform every exercise on demi-pointe--you do this when you reach for something on a high shelf.) Plus, strong glut's prevent you from placing your weight unnecessarily on your joints, and dance lessons will teach you strengthen them, too.
Dancers work their legs possibily more than any other athletes do.
If you take lessons starting in January, you'll go into the 2012 show season in really good physical shape. =D
Totally disagree. Ballet dancers have bulky tight thighs. We as riders want long loose strong legs. We need to stretch like the ballet dancers do, but not build bulky thighs. If you point your toes down, it causes your muscles to contract and bulk up. If you pull your toes up (heels down slightly), it lengthens your legs.

We need some strength in our legs, but not like ballet dancers, it strengthens the wrong muscles in the wrong areas for riding.

If your horse is responding to leg correctly, you don't need super duper strength in your legs. You need a horse to respond to the slightest pressure to go forward.

Has nothing to do with ankle strenght.
     
    12-06-2011, 04:16 PM
  #17
Foal
Hi, I live in the uk, and I have been taught the classical dressage position. It is clearly very different to how you ride western, as we are taught not to wrap our legs round the horses side, we are taught that it is wrong. Your legs should hang long, and your heels should be pretty much vertical to the ground. Our thighs and knees should be gripping the horses side to keep us secure, and our lower legs should hang not touching the horses side. Riding without stirrups helps us get this position, with out legs hanging long. There should be a line from the back of our bum to the back of our heel. This is a picture of Laura Bechtolsheimer, who is a German, who is in the GB Olympic team
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stirrup advice LuckyRVT Horse Riding Critique 9 11-06-2011 09:26 AM
Stirrup Lengths JessPintoMare Horse Tack and Equipment 1 05-15-2011 07:07 PM
Stirrup pad chevaliernr Horse Tack and Equipment 0 03-20-2010 03:13 PM
Stirrup Too Big? vivache Horse Tack and Equipment 4 11-28-2009 05:09 PM
no stirrup work.?! HorsesAreForever Horse Riding 6 09-04-2008 08:01 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0