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Olympic Dressage/Stadium Jumping

This is a discussion on Olympic Dressage/Stadium Jumping within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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        02-25-2013, 11:34 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    You're still very young, and you can take riding as far as you want to as long as you have the passion and dedication to do it.
    You need lessons from a professional if you want to ride properly and be competitive. Right now you're doing okay for being self-taught, but you could be so much further ahead if you took lessons.
    A few things:
    - You're behind the motion of your horse, which makes your posting look awkward.
    - I hate these bitless bridles... You don't know how to use contact properly (not your fault as you haven't been taught) - so your horse's chin is getting jerked on constantly from the sway of your reins.
    - Your saddle is doing you NO favors.. it's causing your leg to be in quite the awkward position, and your knee is over the flap.
    Really, if you want to be competitive, you need a coach. Unfortunately, that means that you're going to have to be very dedicated - and it will take up a TON of time and money.

    If this is your passion, go for it!
    As far as the bitless bridles go, he was very responsive in a snaffle or bitless. I used bitless because of all mistakes a bad rider could make, I did not want to pull on his mouth. I couldn't explain why, but with the bitless it was easier to notice when I put too much pressure. If you could tell, in most places, I actually had to little contact in fear of yanking his mouth.

    Like I stated in my last post, this saddle was miserable. It fit my horse just fine, so he wasn't in pain, but it definitely make riding difficult on my end.

    Thanks for all the tips, and I will be sure to get a good instructor when I move :)
         
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        02-26-2013, 12:04 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    In the future... I say ebay is your friend, and shell out $50 or so for a lockable tool box/storage box (basically a tack box without the fancy price tag!) from Home Depot! :)
    heymckate likes this.
         
        02-26-2013, 12:16 AM
      #13
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by existentialpony    
    In the future... I say ebay is your friend, and shell out $50 or so for a lockable tool box/storage box (basically a tack box without the fay price tag!) from Home Depot! :)
    Long story short, that wasnt an option. If it was, I would have kept my horse. I had my shed door beaten in twice and three locks cut. They stole three saddles (including my soft saddle) three bridles, and tons of other accessories. People would break his stall open and let him out a night so he could play with the barbed wire fence. I got a threat that someone was planning on poisoning him (he went up for sale that week and was in a new home.a week later).I found oats in his stall (which I didnt feed him) and there was a powder of some sort all over them. Kids would throw rocks at him, and other boarders would steal hay right out of his net when I left. I wasnt allowed to have a camera, and the police wouldnt help me.

    He became a nervous wreck because of the abuse. He was loosing weight no matter how much food I gave him (because of people stealing it), and he had back problems because of stupid kids taking advantage of his loving nature and jumping on his back. Overall, it was a horrible boarding center. Either way, my horse is safe now. The weird thing is I never pissed off anyone. Hell, most of them liked me because I helped them a ton before I bought my own horse. Id hate to have see what would have happened if they didnt like me.
         
        02-26-2013, 12:43 AM
      #14
    Trained
    There is absolutely nothing wrong with having a dream.
    However for a dream as big as the olympics (and I think just about every kid that rides wants to go to the Olympics), you can't be dissapointed if you don't make it.
    It is not about when a person started riding, but the dedication, talent, MONEY and time that they have available to them. Look at how many professional riders are around in both jumping and dressage. There are SO many extremely talented riders that still don't make the cut.
    There is an enormous amount of money involved, not just in going to the Olympics itself, but in the preparation just to be somewhat competitive.
    Unless you have a VERY talented horse (and in terms of Dressage, we're talking something imported from Europe, or bred with the best European bloodlines, which will cost a very pretty penny. The horses that compete at the Olympics are worth into the hundreds of thousands of dollars, some even towards the million figure mark.
    On top of that, the coaching for yourself, you will need to base yourself with a professional coach (not just old joe blow from around the corner than can ride a little bit) - which is generally going to cost well over $100 per session.

    It'd be nice to represent your country at the Olympics, but unless you can get very rich, and be unbelievably talented and have multitudes of spare time to put into keeping multiple horses in work, and attending CDI's across the country and internationally, then try aiming your sights at something a little more achievable.
    gypsygirl and heymckate like this.
         
        02-26-2013, 01:04 AM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    There is absolutely nothing wrong with having a dream.
    However for a dream as big as the olympics (and I think just about every kid that rides wants to go to the Olympics), you can't be dissapointed if you don't make it.
    It is not about when a person started riding, but the dedication, talent, MONEY and time that they have available to them. Look at how many professional riders are around in both jumping and dressage. There are SO many extremely talented riders that still don't make the cut.
    There is an enormous amount of money involved, not just in going to the Olympics itself, but in the preparation just to be somewhat competitive.
    Unless you have a VERY talented horse (and in terms of Dressage, we're talking something imported from Europe, or bred with the best European bloodlines, which will cost a very pretty penny. The horses that compete at the Olympics are worth into the hundreds of thousands of dollars, some even towards the million figure mark.
    On top of that, the coaching for yourself, you will need to base yourself with a professional coach (not just old joe blow from around the corner than can ride a little bit) - which is generally going to cost well over $100 per session.

    It'd be nice to represent your country at the Olympics, but unless you can get very rich, and be unbelievably talented and have multitudes of spare time to put into keeping multiple horses in work, and attending CDI's across the country and internationally, then try aiming your sights at something a little more achievable.

    Exactly what I was thinking. It's not a matter of when you start (ok maybe a little..) but you have to realize that the people who make the Olympic team are not only showing at the absolute top shows (nationally and internationally), but they are also showing about 95% of the year. They live in Wellington in the winters, live at Spruce Meadows in the summer, at a show every weekend between, and from a show will also fly overseas to compete internationally and then come back a few days later to complete the show in the states. Each show is literally THOUSANDS of dollars a week per horse and they're showing multiple horses a day. Horses that are several millions of dollars apiece. At this point, they've already paid their millions (yes, I do believe it takes millions to get to the olympics) to even get there. And the sad thing? There are A LOT of riders who do this, are very capable, and don't make the team. Is it wrong to have it as a dream? Of course not. But if you're someone who truly wants a plan they have full intention of achieving I'd start off with smaller steps. A trainer will be necessary. Maybe a small schooling show? Then eventually a rated show? Start aiming for blues at rated shows? Perhaps one day a grand prix? Just because a person never makes it to the olympics doesn't mean that they can't be an exceptional and very very capable rider with quite a bit of success in the show ring.
    gypsygirl and heymckate like this.
         
        02-26-2013, 01:15 AM
      #16
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by upnover    
    But if you're someone who truly wants a plan they have full intention of achieving I'd start off with smaller steps. A trainer will be necessary. Maybe a small schooling show? Then eventually a rated show? Start aiming for blues at rated shows? Perhaps one day a grand prix? Just because a person never makes it to the olympics doesn't mean that they can't be an exceptional and very very capable rider with quite a bit of success in the show ring.
    Just to add to this statement - my dream is to just ride ONE Grand Prix one day. Just one. To get to just this level, even just the training and the care of the horse, you are looking at a huge amount of time and money. Plus the fact that that very few horses even make it to that level, let alone successfully and with high scores. Even the best bred horses, with Grand Prix on both sides, can be duds no matter how well built they are or how well they move. And people pay 10's or even 100's of thousands of dollars for these horses as youngsters.

    Just look at the Aussie Dressage team that went to the Olympics last year. There was HUGE debate surrounding the selection process, with two riders coming from an extremely wealthy family who sponsor and funds multiple CDI's, equine companies etc. in Australia, being selected over riders who actually had better, more consistent scores. Money, money and more money. OR some VERY good sponsors.
    If you are a brilliant rider out doing very well, then sometimes you hit the jackpot and get 'spotted' by an owner - then you might be able to get the ride of a very nice, talented horse without having to buy it. BUT then that same horse can be sold out from underneath you just before reaching your dreams with it.
    It's a tough game!!
         
        02-26-2013, 01:16 AM
      #17
    Green Broke
    As far as your position goes... a dressage position and a jumping position will be different. I'm no dressage expert so I'll let someone else comment there but to jump successfully you must have a very solid and balanced position. Your hips should always be directly over your heels. I see you in more of a long chair seat (heels way out in front of your hips). I'd start off by shortening your stirrups quite a bit (they should hit about your ankle bones when your legs are dangling). That will help you to sink your heels down instead of reaching down with your toes like you are in the video. That will also help your lower leg come back quite a bit. A new saddle will do you wonders as well when you can do something about that. So those would be the first steps: getting your stirrup short enough so that you can sink your weight into your heels so that they're lower then your toes and get your lower leg back. I'd also close your hip angle and let your upper body tilt slightly forward as you're posting. Those two things will make it even easier for you to post as it puts you over your horse's center of gravity instead of behind the motion fighting against your leg. And lastly, hands should be about 4-6 inches apart and very still. I know you want to do show jumping but I would get a copy of the book Hunter Seat Equitation by George Morris. It's all about the details of a proper position and WHY it works.

    Very cute horse!I I'm sorry to hear that you had to sell him and that you had to endure such a frustrating situation. :( bummer. I hope your new place ends up being a much more encouraging place for you to learn and ride.
         
        02-26-2013, 01:26 AM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    Just to add to this statement - my dream is to just ride ONE Grand Prix one day. Just one. To get to just this level, even just the training and the care of the horse, you are looking at a huge amount of time and money. Plus the fact that that very few horses even make it to that level, let alone successfully and with high scores. Even the best bred horses, with Grand Prix on both sides, can be duds no matter how well built they are or how well they move. And people pay 10's or even 100's of thousands of dollars for these horses as youngsters.

    Just look at the Aussie Dressage team that went to the Olympics last year. There was HUGE debate surrounding the selection process, with two riders coming from an extremely wealthy family who sponsor and funds multiple CDI's, equine companies etc. in Australia, being selected over riders who actually had better, more consistent scores. Money, money and more money. OR some VERY good sponsors.
    If you are a brilliant rider out doing very well, then sometimes you hit the jackpot and get 'spotted' by an owner - then you might be able to get the ride of a very nice, talented horse without having to buy it. BUT then that same horse can be sold out from underneath you just before reaching your dreams with it.
    It's a tough game!!
    Ugh. If there's one thing that I hate about the horse world it's MONEY! It just takes so dang much of it to get anywhere! And even if you have a ton of it doesn't mean you'll get there. A grand prix is a challenging goal that is more attainable for the very dedicated and hard working rider with the right trainer and a very good horse, the right connections, and a little luck!! But MUCH more attainable! My goal was a Hunter Derby. I've done a few of them now (and loved it!) but if I'm honest I don't think I'll be able to have a horse with the caliber of actually winning at finals. But at the same time I"m not certain I have the gutsyness I did when I was younger to be jumping 1.40-1.45 successfully to do the GPs (even if I could find a nice GP horse!). My personal goal may just be to the best/most successful rider/trainer I can be and be happy with that. ;)
    heymckate likes this.
         
        02-26-2013, 03:25 AM
      #19
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    Just to add to this statement - my dream is to just ride ONE Grand Prix one day. Just one.
    Mine is to ride a CCI* event. If I can get to that, I will be quite happy. Unfortunately, money is limiting me even getting out to compete unaffiliated this summer, so the dream looks a loooong way away :(
         
        02-26-2013, 04:45 AM
      #20
    Trained
    Money is always the biggest killer. If I had money I'd go and buy myself a 'pre packed' GP horse! In the meantime ill just have to keep snatching rides on friends and coaches horses to tie me over while Spighi wanders up towards FEI
    Posted via Mobile Device
         

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