Is pointing out the toe too bad? - Page 2
 
 

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Is pointing out the toe too bad?

This is a discussion on Is pointing out the toe too bad? within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Toes point out when jumping
  • My toes point out

 
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    06-14-2011, 10:26 AM
  #11
Super Moderator
The only thing that could become complicated in the situation is using spurs. With a foot that points out, the heel will be against the horse's sides. That will keep the spur engaged even when not wanted. Simply use a dressage whip to keep your horse respectful of a light leg so that you never have to wear spurs.
     
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    06-14-2011, 11:18 AM
  #12
Weanling
It was explained to me that closing the toes, closes the knee, which closes the hip. So if you can ride with toes forward it produces a better seat.....
     
    06-14-2011, 12:58 PM
  #13
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsygirl    
for dressage your toes should point forward, but in an a/p saddle or any kind of jumping saddle they should point out a little bit [up to 45degrees] the reason is, you want to use the good part of your calf on the horse - not the back, but the inside. It also depends on your conformation what angle your foot is at. Personally, I walk with my feet very straight forward, but if I try to ride like that I have very little leg that actually touches the horse. If I turn my toes out slightly my whole leg touches the horse. Its really strange to me that so many people think your toes *have* to point forward, because in lessons I have never heard that.
That's interesting. I actually never tried to "measure" how much leg touches the horse depending on angle (and yes, I was talking about dressage).

As for pointing forward looks like everyone I came across saying you have to keep them straight. I never really did any research on it. May be it's time to do some.
     
    06-14-2011, 12:59 PM
  #14
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
The only thing that could become complicated in the situation is using spurs. With a foot that points out, the heel will be against the horse's sides. That will keep the spur engaged even when not wanted. Simply use a dressage whip to keep your horse respectful of a light leg so that you never have to wear spurs.
Thanks, Allison!

Spurs unlikely ever will be on my list. I'm too afraid to jab the horse because of inexperience with them. And yes, I do carry dresssage whip when I ride.
     
    06-14-2011, 01:01 PM
  #15
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by spirithorse8    
It was explained to me that closing the toes, closes the knee, which closes the hip. So if you can ride with toes forward it produces a better seat.....
I think gypsy brought a good point about the human confirmation. I mean if you close the toe how much it'll change the position and how much calf touches the horse? Hmmmmm.....

Folks, I going to try different positions today to see how it works!
     
    06-14-2011, 01:08 PM
  #16
Weanling
Yes our confirmation has a lot to do with our toe position. However, I think that physical injuries are the prevelant problem for not getting the toes foreward. When I teach I find that I have to show my clients that their ankles are rigid rather than supple and fluid. A locked ankle will cause alot of problems with the toes and with contact by the calf. Once one learns, and we have to learn, to unlock the ankle the toes seem to gradually come more forward.
Just my experiences...............
     
    06-14-2011, 01:20 PM
  #17
Trained
A lot depends on the horse and rider. Toes forward is good...all other things being equal. But with my 53 year old legs, toes forward = knees digging into the horse while my tense, rigid leg demolishes my seat.

If I put my toes full forward, no judge would ever notice it. They would be too busy being appalled at my bouncing, my gouging my horse with my knee, and my tense, irritated horse being angry at his incompetent rider.

Of course, if I competed at my best, the judges would still spew their drinks across the field and scream, "Good Lord! Who is that clown and what is he doing to his horse!?!" - so I'll be content with adjusting my riding to make my horse relaxed. And that means a relaxed leg, which in turn means my toes will point out some (about 30-40 deg, depending on which foot).

Edit to add: When I was in my teens, I took some lessons. IIRC, "Toes Forward" seemed to be the Holy Grail of riding a horse. But all it does for me is make me bounce a lot...
     
    06-14-2011, 02:09 PM
  #18
Trained
You mean there are people out there who really can keep their toes forward? I don't think I have enough torque in my hip keep my whole lower body in the right position whilst pointing my toes at his ears. I always thought it was "towards" his ears.

I ride like BSMS, relaxed leg, which means my toes will come out a bit. But I think as long as your goal isn't dressage at the Olympics, I'm not sure it's going to be that big of a deal.
     
    06-14-2011, 02:20 PM
  #19
Green Broke
I personally can't ride with my toes forward. It messes up my entire lower body. I could either force my toes forward (I would have to FORCE; my body doesn't allow toes forward to be a natural position) and have a terrible, tense lower body, or toes outward and a decent lower body. I don't due what's right; I do what works.
     
    06-14-2011, 02:46 PM
  #20
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by spirithorse8    
When I teach I find that I have to show my clients that their ankles are rigid rather than supple and fluid. A locked ankle will cause alot of problems with the toes and with contact by the calf. Once one learns, and we have to learn, to unlock the ankle the toes seem to gradually come more forward.
It's not really locked. It's hard to explain, but if I point forward I feel like I have nothing below the ankle. Weird feeling.
     

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