Quick Trot! - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 09-03-2011, 07:06 PM Thread Starter
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Question Quick Trot!

Hi, I'm going to start loaning a five year old welsh c in two weeks and on my test ride to see if I was suitable for him (it all went well) i found his trot was quite fast how do i keep up or slow him down. Any tips or methods welcome.

Lil Miz
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post #2 of 12 Old 09-03-2011, 07:59 PM
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I'm not sure if you have ever heard of the see saw method? But I just put pressure, release, pressure, release. Posting also helps

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post #3 of 12 Old 09-03-2011, 08:32 PM
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Circles... lots of circles. Circles are your friend.

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post #4 of 12 Old 09-03-2011, 08:42 PM
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I have the same issue with Dancer. When I try to do circles, though, he almost completely stops or I feel like I'm not balanced very well. How do I keep him doing a slow trot at a circle without making him stop? Keep squeezing? Seems counter intuitive.
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post #5 of 12 Old 09-03-2011, 08:48 PM
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I was trained to ever so slightly increase pressure on the reins while decreasing pressure on the legs. It also helps if you slow down your posting and in theory the horse should match your speed. The slower you rise and fall, the slower the horse should go... at least that's how it works for me. :)
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post #6 of 12 Old 09-03-2011, 08:55 PM
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Try trotting about 6' off the rail. When he speeds up turn him into the rail to reverse direction. He'll likely stop the first time but just trot him up again. Too fast, turn back on the rail. After a few of these you will notice he is getting his hindquarters under him and he will be slowing down for a few strides. Just keep working on it. What he will learn is that it's less tiring to slow down than do a turnback. Works for me.
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post #7 of 12 Old 09-04-2011, 12:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WesternSpice View Post
I'm not sure if you have ever heard of the see saw method? But I just put pressure, release, pressure, release. Posting also helps
Oh wow. No. Please don't seesaw your horse's mouth. It is both potentially dangerous as well as detrimental to your horse's training. Seesawing on a horse with a sensitive mouth could cause the horse to react in a way that could hurt both you and your him- rearing, flipping over, bolting to escape the pain, etc. Even if your horse is not so sensitive in his mouth, seesawing will only harden it and then, to be effective, you will have to switch to a harsher bit. Then his mouth will harden to that one. And what are you going to do? Keep increasing the harshness of the bit until there's nothing sharper out there?

I know seesawing is common practice in the western world, but since the OP posted in the english riding forum, she should know that seesawing is heavily frowned upon. Not only is it harsh, it is not necessary if you know how to properly use your BODY (not just your hands) to ride.

My TB, Charlie, has a very sensitive mouth and his natural trot is very quick. When I want to slow his trot down, I control my posting. It is definitely an ab workout and takes a lot of core muscle to do so. But he will slow his trot to match my posting because otherwise his back gets thumped on and he wants to avoid that as much as possible. I count 1...2...1...2 over and over in the rhythm I need him to go. And that helps keep me in rhythm so he is able to get into a consistent, slower trot.

In english riding (correct english riding), riding a horse from back to front is key. Many disciplines focus solely on headset and don't include getting a horse to work from his hind end. The result from riding primarily with your hands is a horse that is on his forehand and is unbalanced. When you ride from your seat and your legs the horse must balance himself and will therefore develop the proper muscles in his hind end.
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post #8 of 12 Old 09-04-2011, 01:58 PM
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Maybe you could try trot poles? He'd have to concentrate more on what he's doing and therefore have to go slower. I don't ride english thou, but it seems like it'd work.
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post #9 of 12 Old 09-04-2011, 02:59 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcscott85 View Post
My TB, Charlie, has a very sensitive mouth and his natural trot is very quick. When I want to slow his trot down, I control my posting. It is definitely an ab workout and takes a lot of core muscle to do so. But he will slow his trot to match my posting because otherwise his back gets thumped on and he wants to avoid that as much as possible. I count 1...2...1...2 over and over in the rhythm I need him to go. And that helps keep me in rhythm so he is able to get into a consistent, slower trot.
That's my usual method thinking about it but, as my new theory goes, I think I wasn't focusing on slowing my rising because I was trying hard to make a good impression on the owner if that makes any sens. Im going to try trotting poles too me thinks and to bring up another problem I have never been quite sure on how to position trotting poles any tips?
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post #10 of 12 Old 09-04-2011, 03:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LilMizSpiky View Post
Im going to try trotting poles too me thinks and to bring up another problem I have never been quite sure on how to position trotting poles any tips?
Depends on the size of the horse, but if your horse is "average" then anywhere from 4 to 5 feet spacing is usually fine. (Lay down three poles and space them 4-5 feet apart from one another.)
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