Sawing - any thoughts?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding

Sawing - any thoughts?

This is a discussion on Sawing - any thoughts? within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Horse not listening to my aids
  • Horse riding sawing?

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    08-02-2011, 06:39 AM
  #1
Foal
Sawing - any thoughts?

I was talking to a horsey friend yesterday, who was asking me how I'm getting on with my riding. She's about the same level as me - roughly two years of riding, working on becoming more of a rider than a passenger, now that I've ridden a few different horses, experienced all the gaits, etc.

In reply, I said that I'm riding a more forward horse so I can get her working correctly and 'on the bit'. My perception of being on the bit is not just a pretty headset but the horse listening to my aids and accepting a bit. She said that to get a horse on the bit, you just saw (give and take on both reins, one at a time). I've heard of this before but I don't really understand what you can achieve with this except getting the horse's attention, and from there comes my question - what is the purpose of sawing and is it helpful in any way?

I'm probably not going to go off and try it, since I have a fantastic trainer at my riding school and I trust her 20 years of experience more than 2, but it just made me wonder. Thanks for any input.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    08-02-2011, 10:31 AM
  #2
Yearling
I don't know about sawing, but you can "tickle" the reins gently with your fingers (open and close your hand around the reins softly) to get your horse to loosen up, relax, and bring their head down.

When I think of sawing I think of yanking back and forth quickly and meanly.

I'm not sure what your friend means by sawing. But tickling the reins can help your horse loosen up if needed.
     
    08-02-2011, 10:36 AM
  #3
Foal
Sawing -- don't do it!

Trust your instructor. Yes, there is a technique of moving the bit back and forth in the mouth, but it should NEVER resemble sawing. It's very gentle and minimal.

Getting a horse "on the bit" starts by riding the rear end of the horse forward into contact.
     
    08-02-2011, 10:43 AM
  #4
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aniranch    
Sawing -- don't do it!
Getting a horse "on the bit" starts by riding the rear end of the horse forward into contact.
This. The more you worry about what your horse is doing with it's head, the more you will lose the rest of the horse. Ride from back to front, and the horse will position the head themselves.
     
    08-02-2011, 10:58 AM
  #5
Started
You should push your horse up from behind so that he is in front of your leg, but behind the briddle. You want to maintain contact with his mouth. People "saw" because that is what they are taught to do in order to get a horse's head down. But they are rarely taught why to do it. Over the years people have meshed together the lesson of half halts with what you refer to "sawing" and the out come is now tug on your horse's mouth to get his head down.

Keep an eye out for those trainers and stay away from them, they are not teaching proper or safe methods.
     
    08-02-2011, 11:08 AM
  #6
Foal
Behind the bridle, wetrain17? Could you please explain what you mean?

"ON" the bit requires the horse to be ridden into the bridle. Behind the bridle, to my mind, indicates the horse is behind the hand. That's surely not what you meant, right?
     
    08-02-2011, 11:32 AM
  #7
Started
I suppose that terminolgy is not correct from the "norm" Most people would say that behind the bit/bridle is the horse avoiding stepping forward into contact, which is correct.

I refer to is as the opposite. I do this only because when I was learning the basics of dressage (i was 10 mind you) I was having a hard time understanding what my trainer was saying until she said "in front of the leg but behind the bridle" For some reason that clicked and I could visualize what she meant. Since then, I refer to it as behind the bridle. Sorry for the confusion. I guess its about time I stop saying that! Habits are hard to break...
     
    08-02-2011, 01:58 PM
  #8
Foal
Thanks for your replies, guys. I too was taught that you work with the hind end and not the head.
     
    08-02-2011, 02:27 PM
  #9
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by wetrain17    
I suppose that terminolgy is not correct from the "norm" Most people would say that behind the bit/bridle is the horse avoiding stepping forward into contact, which is correct.

I refer to is as the opposite. I do this only because when I was learning the basics of dressage (i was 10 mind you) I was having a hard time understanding what my trainer was saying until she said "in front of the leg but behind the bridle" For some reason that clicked and I could visualize what she meant. Since then, I refer to it as behind the bridle. Sorry for the confusion. I guess its about time I stop saying that! Habits are hard to break...

I can see how this visualization would be very helpful for a student to get the feel of having the horse between the driving and the restraining aides. I like that. Maybe better to say "in front of the leg and up to the bridle".

As to "sawing", if you pull alternating such that the horse actually swings his head from side to side, this is really ugly and not helpful. I do, however, use a ticking motion sometimes (as another poster mentioned). I will usually tickle more or exclusively on the inside rein, however, and my goal is to get the horse's attentionn and to have them soften in the jaw on that side.
     
    08-02-2011, 03:51 PM
  #10
Foal
Thanks for the explanation, wetrain! Now it makes sense to me.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
If sawing on the mouth is not good, why does everyone do it.... Citrus Horse Training 25 05-09-2011 11:09 PM
Thoughts ?? Buy or not?? JamieLeighx Horse Riding Critique 4 11-30-2010 10:50 PM
Another maybe...thoughts? QHDragon Horse Riding Critique 15 06-27-2010 01:16 AM
Having second thoughts :o( starlinestables Barn Maintenance 6 02-05-2010 11:13 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0