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Sitting the canter

This is a discussion on Sitting the canter within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • How to sit deep in canter
  • How to make or horse slower in xc

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    08-20-2011, 06:00 PM
  #11
Super Moderator
Are you doing hunters or event/jumper? The canter is addressed totally differently between the two types of disciplines.

There is a difference between canter position and galloping position. In event/jumper, you do sit the canter....but when jumping at speed, you will revert to the galloping position where your seat is out of the saddle. In eventing, you would never go XC sitting the canter, except MAYBE a couple of strides before the jumps at the lower levels. Sitting would put too much strain on the horse and cause him to tire in his back. Up and out of the saddle offers the least resistance on the back and allows the horse less restriction. The photo you showed was an XC photo.

Hunters do not sit deeply at the canter. Their desire is to move as little as possible on the horse to make it appear like the ride is effortless. The tighter more arched back tends to lock the seat, making it difficult to sit deeply.

So, when you changed coaches, did you change disciplines?
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    08-20-2011, 08:16 PM
  #12
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
Are you doing hunters or event/jumper? The canter is addressed totally differently between the two types of disciplines.

There is a difference between canter position and galloping position. In event/jumper, you do sit the canter....but when jumping at speed, you will revert to the galloping position where your seat is out of the saddle. In eventing, you would never go XC sitting the canter, except MAYBE a couple of strides before the jumps at the lower levels. Sitting would put too much strain on the horse and cause him to tire in his back. Up and out of the saddle offers the least resistance on the back and allows the horse less restriction. The photo you showed was an XC photo.

Hunters do not sit deeply at the canter. Their desire is to move as little as possible on the horse to make it appear like the ride is effortless. The tighter more arched back tends to lock the seat, making it difficult to sit deeply.

So, when you changed coaches, did you change disciplines?
Yeah, my old stable/instructor had no particular discipline it was just equitation for pleasure. This is the first time I'm at a stable where there's an emphasis on showing, definitely hunter/jumper.
I'm eager to learn both I just didn't know which one I should be practicing more. Is one more of a "higher level" than the other? Like learning the posting trot before the sitting trot? Did I learn to sit the canter first because 2 point canter was harder?
     
    08-20-2011, 08:18 PM
  #13
Foal
This is my new stable's website, if that helps at all!

Reinbow's End Farm || Professional Training || Hunters - Jumpers - Equitation || Horses For Sale
     
    08-21-2011, 02:24 PM
  #14
Super Moderator
Sitting deep and absorbing with your back is more dressage/event.

Shallow seat at the canter with stiffer back is hunters. If you are looking to show hunters, you do need to change.....sadly.
     
    08-21-2011, 05:11 PM
  #15
Yearling
Is there no such thing as all-round English lessons anymore?? We were taught sitting, half-seat and two-point canter. All are correct, they're just used for different things.

We were also introduced to posting the canter. From what I remember it's a trick used to steady a strung out horse. It's kind of like if your weight keeps moving the horse has to compensate by balancing themselves better. I seem to remember I was riding a chronically fast mare when we did it and it made her much slower.
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    08-21-2011, 08:38 PM
  #16
Foal
I was always taught to either sit at the canter or two-point at the canter. The instructors I've had in the past say you have to sit in your seat and stay like that or go into two-point. But usually when I would post at the canter it would make the horse slow to a trot, hence because of posting trot and my instructor would always be like, "You want him to canter, but you're posting in your seat, and the horse is like 'oh I'll just trot then.'" I don't know, that's just what I was always taught, I never post in my canter. I just find it easier to either sit in the saddle or two-point. Sorry, rambling now hehe. I also agree with ponyboy, it does help when you have to slow the horse down a bit.

Also Mila, funny that you mention that you are with Reinbow's End Farm. I was looking there for horse boarding! But alas, they are too expensive for me!
     
    08-22-2011, 05:19 PM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by ponyboy    
Is there no such thing as all-round English lessons anymore?? We were taught sitting, half-seat and two-point canter. All are correct, they're just used for different things.

We were also introduced to posting the canter. From what I remember it's a trick used to steady a strung out horse. It's kind of like if your weight keeps moving the horse has to compensate by balancing themselves better. I seem to remember I was riding a chronically fast mare when we did it and it made her much slower.

That was my first trainer. It definitely does seem like there's no overall riding lessons anymore.

Although she titles herself a dressage trainer, I learned it all. She was more about being able to ride techically correct no matter what you're doing, moreso than just dressage, dressage, dressage. I still go back over to her for a lesson or two, just because she'll pick me to pieces on the little things. She corrects the technical riding, not so much the impression.
     
    08-22-2011, 10:14 PM
  #18
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by ponyboy    
Is there no such thing as all-round English lessons anymore?? We were taught sitting, half-seat and two-point canter. All are correct, they're just used for different things.
I rode for a well-known equitation trainer when I first started to ride and this is what he taught us.

It really comes down to what discipline you're riding and what your coach's preference is. (Although I can't believe they'd only teach *one* correct way to canter. That is kind of odd.)

Funny enough, my current trainer and I had a recent conversation about how to ride the canter in between fences. She's always done a 1/2 seat canter between fences, while it seems like a large number of riders in our area are doing more of a full-seat until a stride or two from the fence.
     
    08-22-2011, 11:57 PM
  #19
Yearling
I'm sorry if this was already said, I read about half the first page then got lazy. But I don't think the girls in your lesson are posting at the canter. I think they are just sitting in a half seat. It's not quite like two-point but more of a, sit forward and not put weight on the horses back.

It's probably not even called a half seat, but that's what me and my friend call it.

And also, if you ever try posting at the canter, it is soo hard lol :p
     
    08-23-2011, 08:57 AM
  #20
Yearling
There is also the 3-pt canter which I was taught to use on some horses due to their issues and some trainers like it, its like sitting to the canter but not quite all your weight is really deep in the saddle, its def hard bc you have to use a lot of muscle in your legs but in H/j 2-pt in the norm for cantering
     

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