Sitting the trot? - The Horse Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 29 Old 07-16-2009, 10:10 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 209
• Horses: 0
Sitting the trot?

Ok so I wonder if someone might be able to give me some tips, so I've always had troubles sitting the trot for some reason. I've been lucky i've ridden a lot of horses with smooth trots and my instructor has always put me on horses with smooth quiet trots. But lately my instructor has started switching me to different horses and the one I rode tonight had a really springy trot and I just COULD NOT sit to it. I tried to sit up, move to the motion of the horse and relax but it just wasn't working for me. I took my stirrups away and tried and I stayed on fine but could feel myself bouncing and I don't know what to do about it. Any tips on exercises I could do? Because no matter how hard I try to sit up straight, move with the horse and relax my body it's just not working for me.
Endless Journey Girl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 29 Old 07-17-2009, 02:59 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,807
• Horses: 0
Hmm, sitting trot is hard for me to do, also. What i do is really press my seat down and hold on with my leg minus hittin the horses sides.
ilovemyPhillip is offline  
post #3 of 29 Old 07-17-2009, 03:17 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
Posts: 22,140
• Horses: 24
Some horses, it takes a very talented person to sit the trot. My Perch has a very animated trot and I cannot sit it no matter what I do. Every time I tried, I would end up getting bounced higher and higher every step.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
smrobs is offline  
post #4 of 29 Old 07-17-2009, 10:54 AM
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: UK
Posts: 2,061
• Horses: 1
Learning trot - buy a copy of the British Horse Society manual ISBN O-872119-33-6 Go to page 31.
Instructions: 1 Find experienced, rythmic, steady horse. Nothing fast skittish, flirty or fancy. A nice broad flat back is admirable. Cobs are great.
Adjust stirrup leathers to allow ball of foot to rest with toes pointing up at 45 deg angle
Squeeze horse into slow trot
Sense rythm of horse's 2 beat movement (up/down up/down). Don't allow horse to speed up, keep pace slow and gentle
Rise slightly and in tune with the beat, off knee tucked into knee roll and ball of foot resting on bar of stirrup iron. Sense the upward pressure from the horse.
Don't rise too high. Take care to be in perfect upright balance.
Incline body very very slightly fowards from pelvis to absorb forward speed.
When dropping back down into saddle take care to land softly on saddle.
Keep up and down motion fluid - no hesitations.
Keep very loose contact with horses mouth thru reins to the bit - horses head will move only slightly at the trot. Take care not to jolt bit in the horse's mouth.
Hands and arms must be kept still despite motion of horse,
Keep head up and still, face direction of horse's movement
At beginning ride horse on lunge line with friend keeping the horse at steady, slowish, speed from the centre of the circle.
Rest and revert to walk on regular basis. When resuming trot, Rise to trot with squeeze of heel against horse's flank. At same instant call out to horse: "TROT ON"
Practice, practice, practice, go round and round in circles.
PS It will help to take Pilates lessons to strengthen stomach & back muscles. The under thigh muscles will take time to develop.
At first you may get lower back ache and even stomach muscle ache.
Always practice on flat level grassy or sandy surface of a fenced arena - no hills nor slopes.
The better you get, the easier it will become.
xxBarry Godden is offline  
post #5 of 29 Old 07-17-2009, 11:07 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Hawthorne, FL
Posts: 852
• Horses: 2
try rolling your pelvis so you are sitting more on the pockets of your butt and remember to breath and relax the bottom part of your back. one of my geldings has a VERY VERY rough trot and after working on it for a while with no stirrups and sitting on my butt i learned how to sit it. it does take time but this will be good for you and def make you a better rider.

"The horse you get off is not the same as the horse you got on; it is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible the change is for the better."
FoxyRoxy1507 is offline  
post #6 of 29 Old 07-17-2009, 11:39 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 209
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by FoxyRoxy1507 View Post
try rolling your pelvis so you are sitting more on the pockets of your butt and remember to breath and relax the bottom part of your back. one of my geldings has a VERY VERY rough trot and after working on it for a while with no stirrups and sitting on my butt i learned how to sit it. it does take time but this will be good for you and def make you a better rider.
Thanks, yea I'm planning on doing lots of no stirrups, like I said I can stay on at the trot with out stirrups I just bounce a lot.
Endless Journey Girl is offline  
post #7 of 29 Old 07-17-2009, 11:42 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 209
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry Godden View Post
Learning trot - buy a copy of the British Horse Society manual ISBN O-872119-33-6 Go to page 31.
Instructions: 1 Find experienced, rythmic, steady horse. Nothing fast skittish, flirty or fancy. A nice broad flat back is admirable. Cobs are great.
Adjust stirrup leathers to allow ball of foot to rest with toes pointing up at 45 deg angle
Squeeze horse into slow trot
Sense rythm of horse's 2 beat movement (up/down up/down). Don't allow horse to speed up, keep pace slow and gentle
Rise slightly and in tune with the beat, off knee tucked into knee roll and ball of foot resting on bar of stirrup iron. Sense the upward pressure from the horse.
Don't rise too high. Take care to be in perfect upright balance.
Incline body very very slightly fowards from pelvis to absorb forward speed.
When dropping back down into saddle take care to land softly on saddle.
Keep up and down motion fluid - no hesitations.
Keep very loose contact with horses mouth thru reins to the bit - horses head will move only slightly at the trot. Take care not to jolt bit in the horse's mouth.
Hands and arms must be kept still despite motion of horse,
Keep head up and still, face direction of horse's movement
At beginning ride horse on lunge line with friend keeping the horse at steady, slowish, speed from the centre of the circle.
Rest and revert to walk on regular basis. When resuming trot, Rise to trot with squeeze of heel against horse's flank. At same instant call out to horse: "TROT ON"
Practice, practice, practice, go round and round in circles.
PS It will help to take Pilates lessons to strengthen stomach & back muscles. The under thigh muscles will take time to develop.
At first you may get lower back ache and even stomach muscle ache.
Always practice on flat level grassy or sandy surface of a fenced arena - no hills nor slopes.
The better you get, the easier it will become.
Unfortunately this doesn't help me, I am perfectly fine doing the rising trot(other than being on the wrong diagonal the odd time), it's sitting trot that I struggle with.
Endless Journey Girl is offline  
post #8 of 29 Old 07-19-2009, 09:00 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Steeler country!
Posts: 203
• Horses: 0
Working without stirrups will probably help a bit so good job trying that. Umm you just need to relax. Especially your stomach muscles. They tend to tense up when sitting the trot so you need to train them to relax and after that the trot will feel smoother.

All horses deserve, at least once in their lives, to be loved by a little girl.
wintec is offline  
post #9 of 29 Old 07-19-2009, 12:38 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: MD
Posts: 11,564
• Horses: 1
Ah, at my lesson Wednesday night, we were doing a lot of non-stirrup work, & we had to post AND sit the trot. :O
Daytona's trot can be a bit bouncy to sit to...but what really helped me not bounce as much was to sit back just a little bit (not too much), & just let my legs hang there. If you grip with your legs, then it makes it even worse, I found. Just try to relax, & let your legs hang down- but make sure you move your toes up & down, that usually helps as well.

Ride more, worry less.
PoptartShop is offline  
post #10 of 29 Old 07-19-2009, 01:53 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,474
• Horses: 0
Put a $50 bill under your bum and tell anyone watching if it falls to the ground its theirs to keep - you won't bounce

Imagine someone has punched you in the stomach, so your bum is tucked underneath you and your stomach is relaxed

A good horse can never be a bad colour...
moomoo is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help with sitting trot! Sunny Dandy Horse Talk 26 07-24-2009 01:15 PM
Sitting trot GypsyNymph English Riding 16 07-17-2009 01:29 PM
Unable to do sitting trot Aliboo Horse Riding 11 07-06-2009 04:30 AM
Sitting trot is my nemesis... IrishRider English Riding 26 06-08-2009 11:34 PM
Sitting Trot and Bareback ChingazMyBoy English Riding 13 05-29-2009 09:03 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome