Sitting the trot? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 29 Old 07-21-2009, 05:07 PM
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There's a method to it. I had the hang of it on Rocket, but when I got Razz no matter what I do, can't apply it to her trot. I've tried just about everything, too.
Yeah the no stirrups only works if you can ride without stirrups without killing yourself. Long story, don't ask, but what I said is true, no stirrups is suicide on my horse.

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Last edited by tempest; 07-21-2009 at 05:09 PM.
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post #12 of 29 Old 07-21-2009, 09:02 PM
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Alot of no stirrup work will help, as can bareback work on a longe line.

If you can think sitting tall, while 'keep butt planted', that can help alot too. Use your thigh to achieve some 'grip' if you need too, but becareful not to lock your knee or lower leg onto the horse, or he may go faster!

"The ideal horseman has the courage of a lion, the patience of a saint, and the hands of a woman..."
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post #13 of 29 Old 07-21-2009, 11:37 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2pride View Post
Alot of no stirrup work will help, as can bareback work on a longe line.

If you can think sitting tall, while 'keep butt planted', that can help alot too. Use your thigh to achieve some 'grip' if you need too, but becareful not to lock your knee or lower leg onto the horse, or he may go faster!
Haha yea I learned my lesson pretty quickly with that one. Except I did that at the canter. It's like an automatic reaction for me to lock my knee's. I was riding this horse and I lost my stirrup because he was going quite fast as it was, then I started squeezing with my legs and he started going REALLY fast lol. I managed to keep my cool though and eventually managed to compose myself and get him to slow down.
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post #14 of 29 Old 07-22-2009, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Endless Journey Girl View Post
Haha yea I learned my lesson pretty quickly with that one. Except I did that at the canter. It's like an automatic reaction for me to lock my knee's. I was riding this horse and I lost my stirrup because he was going quite fast as it was, then I started squeezing with my legs and he started going REALLY fast lol. I managed to keep my cool though and eventually managed to compose myself and get him to slow down.
I remember accidentally doing that to a Mustang mare that I used to ride alot who was really sensitive to leg pressure...she tossed me! Lol! I learnt my lesson that day!!!Lol!

"The ideal horseman has the courage of a lion, the patience of a saint, and the hands of a woman..."
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post #15 of 29 Old 07-28-2009, 05:30 PM
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I have a hard time sitting the trot, and so my instructor put me on a lunge bareback. She's the second person to do that to try and help my trot. Personally I really work hard to try to grip with my thighs (I'm normally super harsh with my lower leg grip) and I find that helps me stay down. Other than that, I don't know. :p
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post #16 of 29 Old 07-30-2009, 05:55 AM
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Think about it.
Sitting trot seems easier without stirrups because the rider is utilising gravity and the full weight of the body against the upward thrust from the horse's movement. Ie the rider's full weight is heavier than the force of the thrust. However without stirrups all the rider can do to absorb thrust is to "crumple" at the waist and perhaps take some of the thrust in the fatty tissue of the butt because the upper skeleton of the human is pretty rigid.

With the aid of the stirrup irons there are additional shock absorbers for use ie the toes, the ankles, the knees and the hips. These joints which are kept under tension by ligaments can bend under the force of the thrust and can thereby absorb the thrust.

It is all bit like skiing downhill - the skis go up and down but the hips stay at the same height.

To sit the trot starts with the correct "seat". Toes up, heels down, stirrups adjusted correctly, toes turned parallel to horse's body,body weight on the three seat bones , sat up straight 90 degrees whilst retaining natural curve in lower back , head upright and looking straight ahead, hands held either side of horse's wither. Stomach muscles held in. Rider in perfect balance and shoulders relaxed yet without slumping. When in this position the rider should feel the horse through the saddle via the under thigh muscles.

When practising first the rider has to sense the rythym of the horse and the slower the jog the better at the beginning. Up down, up down. A horse with a nice long stride makes it easier - ponies move their legs too fast and too short. The faster the horse moves - the more difficult it becomes. Careful selection of a suitable patient horse is important - because having a learner human bouncing up and down on its back is not every horse's idea of fun.

With practise eventually the silent part of the brain which controls our instinctive reactions starts to learn what to do. That bit of the brain certainly doesn't want to fall off. But it is very important that the rider starts from the correct "seat" - otherwise the silent brain may learn to respond incorrectly.

A shoe lace across the front of the saddle will act as a balancing aid for use by the thumb - but the rider must not tip forwards.

It also helps if the learner rider is sitting on a horse on the lunge - so that the responsibility for keeping the horse steady is with the person in the centre of the arena.

The big enemy of learning the sitting trot is tension in the rider. The brain sends out the message "this is dangerous" and as a result the body stiffens up at a time when relaxation is the key requirement. Keep the work light hearted. Try some music. Wiggle the toes. And work on it for short periods only and steadily build up. Use the same horse every time.

But don't get too fussed about it, unless you want to go in for dressage competitions. It is far more important that you master the rising trot.
Sitting trot will come naturally with time and for some high stepping short legged horses (fancy trotting welsh cobs for example) it is a pace with little use. Big heavy Shires with nice broad backs can be a doddle.

B G
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post #17 of 29 Old 08-10-2009, 01:00 PM
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I used to/kind of still do ride a big stocky shire, and I can sit to her sitting trot really well, however, i've been riding a huge cob for the last month or so, and I have tried his sitting trot and i've got no hope sitting to it.. i'm all over the place.. I think I tense up too much.. im tempted to go into the arena and stick my ipod in and just ride, hopefully then the music will stop me from tensing..
X

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post #18 of 29 Old 08-10-2009, 01:14 PM
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Originally Posted by moomoo View Post
Put a $50 bill under your bum and tell anyone watching if it falls to the ground its theirs to keep - you won't bounce

Imagine someone has punched you in the stomach, so your bum is tucked underneath you and your stomach is relaxed
LOL
We have a class like that at horse shows called sit-a-buck, except it's with $1 bills.
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post #19 of 29 Old 08-10-2009, 02:56 PM
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Quit gripping with your legs. If you lock any of your leg muscles, it will lock your hip, and therefore stop it from moving with the horse. Your legs need to be relaxed, and lean back. You'll feel like your leaning a lot further than you are, but you probably aren't leaning back enough. =] Imagine you are doing sit-ups, but instead of your upper body moving to meet your lower body, allow your tummy to crunch and let your lower body come up to meet your upper body.

"Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds."
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post #20 of 29 Old 08-10-2009, 06:44 PM
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^^ Really good description Ricci.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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