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Sitting the trot?

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        08-11-2009, 11:13 PM
      #21
    Foal
    I think my instructor babied me for too long, she's always put me on the horses with smoother trots so I never really had a problem. I didn't really think I had a problem sitting the trot until I got on a few horses with a bouncier trot and I was all over the place. I think with some more I will probably get the hang of it. I really do think no stirrups does help me It takes away that safety of the stirrups and I can no longer depend on them to keep me in the tack and forces me to relax more and sink deep into the tack and move with the horse. When I have my stirrups I get uncomfortable and tend to resort back to posting trot.
         
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        08-12-2009, 12:50 AM
      #22
    Weanling
    I've always felt like from easiest to hardest its posting w/ stirrups, then sitting w/ stirrups, then sitting without, then posting without haha. After posting without for a few minutes posting with is like heaven haha

    But I have been working stirrupless with my giant TB and its really been helping me a lot! Just make sure to stay on your two butt bones at all times.
         
        08-12-2009, 12:58 AM
      #23
    Foal
    My suggestion would be is to relax and sit deep. If you grip with your knee's it makes things worse...you are going to want to sit up straight, pretend there is a string attached to your belly button and its goes straight up to the sky, follow that line in straightness with your upper body, and put your shoulders back then when you are trotting you are going to want to have your ankles support the shock, by putting your weight down through your legs.

    I hope this helps some!
         
        08-12-2009, 05:56 AM
      #24
    Green Broke
    My advice, some members may disagree but it seemed to help me with sitting Chinga's trot. I can sit all the riding school horses trots, but when it comes to Chinga I can't get it. So I've worked without stirrups and bareback, once I became better without stirrups I would work with extra long stirrups untill I was at my normal length.
         
        08-12-2009, 08:07 AM
      #25
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by riccil0ve    
    Quit gripping with your legs. If you lock any of your leg muscles, it will lock your hip, and therefore stop it from moving with the horse. Your legs need to be relaxed, and lean back. You'll feel like your leaning a lot further than you are, but you probably aren't leaning back enough. =] Imagine you are doing sit-ups, but instead of your upper body moving to meet your lower body, allow your tummy to crunch and let your lower body come up to meet your upper body.
    I agree...gripping too tightly with the legs and being stiff, intentionally or because of nervousness, tension, or 'thinking too much', is the absolute enemy of being comfortable on a horse, regardless of the gait....and it's made worse because people are told, and therefore anticipate, that sitting the trot will be hard.
    I like the sit-ups analogy, and have also suggested thinking like you're in a rocking chair...letting your hips roll with the horse's movement.
    Relax, shut of the 'thinking' part of your brain, let your body react to the horse's movements, and....have fun.
         
        08-12-2009, 12:34 PM
      #26
    Started
    Look you guys - you don't have to sit to the trot. The simple answer at the beginning of learning to ride English, is always to rise/post to the trot.
    Sitting trot is fine in certain circumstances but it is harder on the horse which has to thrust up against the additional weight of the rider.
    When going uphill at the trot, a situation you might think of sitting in to, instead you can post or even stand in the stirrups. Just grab a handful of mane and get up off the horse's back to help with the balance.
    Don't normally choose to trot coming downhill - it can be hard on the horse's front legs especially on a hard surface.
    Some of the smaller horses who have pony ancestors have a very fast short paced trot. (Welsh Cobs for example). They can be devils to sit to. On the other hand a big heavy horse with cob in its bloodlines will be much easier to sit in to because it has a longer stride, a slower rythym and a nice broad back.
    The sitting trot will come. One day you'll be mounted on a forward going, steady, muscled up, schooled horse and you'll sit in and feel comfortable but by then all of the centre core muscles you'll need will have been developed as will the coordination to make the action smooth.

    If you feel you want to make the posting trot more difficult then try getting the horse to lengthen and shorten its pace and to speed up and slow down its rythym Those are far more relevant challenges. These exercises will involve the subtle use of the hands/reins/bit and the under thigh muscles and other muscles around the pelvis.

    Don't forget , riding is all about enjoyment.

    Barry G
         
        08-12-2009, 01:32 PM
      #27
    Foal
    Yea I'd much rather post the trot as well, but I'd like to eventually ride my lease horse bareback, in which case it's easier to sit the trot.
         
        08-12-2009, 01:58 PM
      #28
    Showing
    Some horses, it is much easier to sit the trot bareback than it is with a saddle. My QH Denny, because of the way he travels, is impossible to sit the trot in the saddle. However, bareback it is no problem.
         
        08-13-2009, 10:36 AM
      #29
    Trained
    I don't think it's harder on the horse to sit the trot. I mean, it's still carrying all your weight whether you sit, stand, or two point. You are on your horse and there is no where else for your weight to go. Your balance just shifts and puts the weight in different places.

    When my instructor decided to teach me to sit the trot, I was riding a big TB named Spencer [RIP] and he had the biggest, bounciest trot in the whole wide world. I've ridden choppy trots, but his was not choppy, it was just HUGE. When you post, you aren't supposed to post higher than the pommel of your saddle right? Well with him, that was practically impossible. I did manage to sit his trot for like, three strides one time, but that was all I ever got. I was proud all the same. =]
         

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