Sitting Trot Help? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 94 Old 12-22-2011, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by ErikaLynn View Post
Ehhh..yes. If your heals are up you are floppy. Down you are more secure. Sinking weight into your heals helps with position. .
A lower HEEL is the by product of a relaxed and open pelvis and leg. It isn't something you force to happen. Most GP level dressage riders ride with their foot nearly flat on the irons. I think they know how to sit the gait.

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You can't tell someone to disregard my advice.
I most certainly can.

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Heals down is one of the main things you should do while ride.
That isn't something you DO. It's something that occurs as the result of you relaxing and opening your body correctly so that you are not pinching with your legs and thus your weight flows down to your feet.
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post #12 of 94 Old 12-22-2011, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by mildot View Post
A lower HEEL is the by product of a relaxed and open pelvis and leg. It isn't something you force to happen. Most GP level dressage riders ride with their foot nearly flat on the irons. I think they know how to sit the gait.


I most certainly can.


That isn't something you DO. It's something that occurs as the result of you relaxing and opening your body correctly so that you are not pinching with your legs and thus your weight flows down to your feet.
No one is talking about GP dressage riders.

I was always taught to keep my heels down. And having your heel down is the most essential part of riding. Heels up, you fall off easier, your legs are loose, you have zero balance, and no control. I don't know what you are talking about, but you very rude to tell someone not to take my advice then give no advice in return. If you have nothing of use to say, then you should shut your mouth.

Sorry, to the OP for taking this thread off topic . I said what I needed to say.

Last edited by ErikaLynn; 12-22-2011 at 02:54 PM.
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post #13 of 94 Old 12-22-2011, 03:03 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by ErikaLynn View Post
No one is talking about GP dressage riders.

I was always taught to keep my heels down. And having your heel down is the most essential part of riding. Heels up, you fall off easier, your legs are loose, you have zero balance, and no control. I don't know what you are talking about, but you very rude to tell someone not to take my advice then give no advice in return. If you have nothing of use to say, then you should shut your mouth.

Sorry, to the OP for taking this thread off topic . I said what I needed to say.
I have always been taught to keep my heels down, and I have learned what happens when you don't. Your upper body falls forwards, and you feel fall out of the stirrups, and you fall off; happens every-now-and-then. ;) The barn owner actually showed me a video today on YouTube that all you really truly do is move with your hips. Kind of like a posting trot and a canter, but still sitting in the saddle if you know what I mean. If you ignore her funky legs and heels, and the fact that her stirrups are a lot longer because she is riding dressage (I ride hunter/jumpers).

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post #14 of 94 Old 12-22-2011, 03:10 PM
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I have always been taught to keep my heels down, and I have learned what happens when you don't. Your upper body falls forwards, and you feel fall out of the stirrups, and you fall off; happens every-now-and-then. ;) The barn owner actually showed me a video today on YouTube that all you really truly do is move with your hips. Kind of like a posting trot and a canter, but still sitting in the saddle if you know what I mean. If you ignore her funky legs and heels, and the fact that her stirrups are a lot longer because she is riding dressage (I ride hunter/jumpers).

Learning to Sit the Trot - YouTube

That is a good video. She is moving her hips like that because she is pushing her horse with her seat. Since you ride hunters, you really don't need to move all that much..if your heels are down and you're relaxed, your body should naturally flow with the horse. Just practice you'll get the feel of it.
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post #15 of 94 Old 12-22-2011, 03:21 PM
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Let me just say... when you are FIRST learning to ride, everyone tells you to keep those heels down and so we PUSH them down and we don't have enough weight in the seat.

What I have found to experience is that over time you develop this beautiful thing called muscle memory and you do it naturally without having to "push" to "brace."

Mildot is correct that a relaxed leg will help you sit the trot better and that pushing or leaning against the stirrups isn't but first you need to figure out how to put all of your weight into the seat and down your legs.

Erika is right because you do need to keep those heels down, but not to push them down like you're making a hole into the earth, or bracing against them so you start slamming or popping onto your horse's back.

It's a fine balance.

But how I'd better describe the "feel" of the sitting trot is that your seat bones are moving with the horse. Your legs are on the horse but not pressing. They are stretched down all the way to your feet, and you are lightly keeping pressure onto the ball of your foot.

Now, the main thing you need to focus on is relaxing your hips.. tight hips makes for a very bumpy unpleasant ride. Secondly, the horse needs to not be hollow.. that also makes for a very bumpy ride. Thirdly, you need to stretch down and push all the weight into your seat and down the inside of your legs while making sure that your legs don't curl up into fetal position.

Work on one thing at a time, for a little bit of time, each time you get on your horse.

Also, remember... posting first helps both you AND your horse warm up and get ready to sit the trot.

It's hard.. but once you get it, it's awesome! Believe me, my horse's soft trot used to feel like a rocket launcher.
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post #16 of 94 Old 12-22-2011, 03:25 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel View Post
Let me just say... when you are FIRST learning to ride, everyone tells you to keep those heels down and so we PUSH them down and we don't have enough weight in the seat.

What I have found to experience is that over time you develop this beautiful thing called muscle memory and you do it naturally without having to "push" to "brace."

Mildot is correct that a relaxed leg will help you sit the trot better and that pushing or leaning against the stirrups isn't but first you need to figure out how to put all of your weight into the seat and down your legs.

Erika is right because you do need to keep those heels down, but not to push them down like you're making a hole into the earth, or bracing against them so you start slamming or popping onto your horse's back.

It's a fine balance.

But how I'd better describe the "feel" of the sitting trot is that your seat bones are moving with the horse. Your legs are on the horse but not pressing. They are stretched down all the way to your feet, and you are lightly keeping pressure onto the ball of your foot.

Now, the main thing you need to focus on is relaxing your hips.. tight hips makes for a very bumpy unpleasant ride. Secondly, the horse needs to not be hollow.. that also makes for a very bumpy ride. Thirdly, you need to stretch down and push all the weight into your seat and down the inside of your legs while making sure that your legs don't curl up into fetal position.

Work on one thing at a time, for a little bit of time, each time you get on your horse.

Also, remember... posting first helps both you AND your horse warm up and get ready to sit the trot.

It's hard.. but once you get it, it's awesome! Believe me, my horse's soft trot used to feel like a rocket launcher.
Thanks. I agree. =) Today when I rode my heels were down by themselves for about half of the sitting trot we did until I suddenly got unbalanced and shoved my heels down, and then I actually wasn't sitting it as well, but it was still working. I wish I had a video but my mom was working. =( My trainer said I did really really well today, especially while jumping.
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post #17 of 94 Old 12-22-2011, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by HorseLoverHunter View Post
Thanks. I agree. =) Today when I rode my heels were down by themselves for about half of the sitting trot we did until I suddenly got unbalanced and shoved my heels down, and then I actually wasn't sitting it as well, but it was still working. I wish I had a video but my mom was working. =( My trainer said I did really really well today, especially while jumping.
:) awesome! Gotta love those good lessons :)

But yeah.. over correcting yourself can lead to being very unbalanced. Everything must be done in small tiny little soft steps. The softer and smaller, the more sensitive your horse becomes to you shifting your body weight and things like leg yields and cantering and circles become very easy.
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post #18 of 94 Old 12-22-2011, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by ErikaLynn View Post
No one is talking about GP dressage riders.
They are the best at sitting the trot. Maybe you should start paying attention to how they ride.
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post #19 of 94 Old 12-22-2011, 05:04 PM
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If you ignore her funky legs and heels,
Learning to Sit the Trot - YouTube
You can't ignore her "funky legs and heels" because she's doing it right.

The "funky legs and heels" are a by product of total relaxation anywhere where tension is not needed and a core that exactly follows the motion of the horse by constantly contracting and releasing the abdominal and lumbar muscles.

Her heels are not "down" the way hunters ride only because the length of her leathers is where it should be for work on the flat. I guarantee you that the balls of her feet are rock solid on the irons.

Last edited by mildot; 12-22-2011 at 05:07 PM.
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post #20 of 94 Old 12-22-2011, 05:08 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by mildot View Post
You can't ignore her "funky legs and heels" because she's doing it right.
Her leg is swinging back and forth, and her heels keep coming up. My barn owner told me to ignore them because I was told not to ride like that, especially because I ride hunter/jumpers. Your supposed to be looked at her hips and not her feet or legs.
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