Snaffles in dressage - Page 3
   

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Snaffles in dressage

This is a discussion on Snaffles in dressage within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

    View Poll Results: Do you think a snaffle with drop/flash noseband is better than a double bridle?
    Yes 8 72.73%
    No 3 27.27%
    Voters: 11. You may not vote on this poll

     
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        08-12-2008, 11:20 PM
      #21
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kickshaw
    upnover, I probably had it backwards!
    No I would agree with what you said! It just depends on if you're showing through (and following the rules of) USDF or eventing.

    I was replying to ponyboy, who was asking if flashes were ever banned from dressage all together.
         
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        08-13-2008, 01:25 PM
      #22
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by claireauriga
    Heh, a similar discussion goes on here.
    Interesting. I thought the Olympic x-country was great too. I also agree that eventers are in it for the XC - It should be its own sport really.
         
        08-22-2008, 05:39 PM
      #23
    Trained
    Flashes have a purpose. And it's not to keep the horse's mouth closed!! They are there to stabilize the bit so that the rider's aids won't be confused by the bit moving, like then the horse chews the bit.
    Drop nosebands are most commonly seen on stallions because they put pressure on the end of the nose bone and are a little harsher when the horse opens it's mouth and apparently that over-rides testosterone? They are also really useful for lunging! You can attach the line to both the noseband and the bit, so if the horse bolts the bit doesn't go through the mouth.
    I don't think any of you have ridden many PSG/I1 horses. On some of them you NEED a double. At a certain point in the training the horses need re-enforcement up front. With some of them this point never comes because they are so sensitive. With others, like stallions with biiig necks, they eventually realize that they can undermine you with their necks. Then when they get hot in the tempis, your half halts stop going through and pretty soon you are doing a nice handgallop above the bit around the corners as a set up for your half pass/ three tempis which is NOT FUN in the middle of a test. So the double really comes in handy because you can just lift your hand(s) up sharply and all of a sudden your nice balanced horse is back :) Some horses don't need a double, some do. It's the same with some horses need spurs some don't, etc.
    I think it's in the US the rule that doubles are not mandatory in FEI classes anymore, which is good, imo. Not in qualifiers or FEI sanctioned competitions though. They're still trying to push that through.
         
        08-22-2008, 05:47 PM
      #24
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~
    Flashes have a purpose. And it's not to keep the horse's mouth closed!! They are there to stabilize the bit so that the rider's aids won't be confused by the bit moving, like then the horse chews the bit.
    Seems to me bit stops, full cheek snaffles and D-ring snaffles accomplish the same thing.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~
    Drop nosebands are most commonly seen on stallions because they put pressure on the end of the nose bone and are a little harsher when the horse opens it's mouth and apparently that over-rides testosterone?
    Do you have a source for that?
         
        08-22-2008, 06:22 PM
      #25
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ponyboy
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~
    Flashes have a purpose. And it's not to keep the horse's mouth closed!! They are there to stabilize the bit so that the rider's aids won't be confused by the bit moving, like then the horse chews the bit.
    Seems to me bit stops, full cheek snaffles and D-ring snaffles accomplish the same thing.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~
    Drop nosebands are most commonly seen on stallions because they put pressure on the end of the nose bone and are a little harsher when the horse opens it's mouth and apparently that over-rides testosterone?
    Do you have a source for that?
    Bit stops are illegal, and full cheeks and dees do still move, plus they are a lot uglyer than a loose-ring

    Look at any young stallion videos from any verband.
    "Invented by the Spanish Riding School, this noseband encircles the nose around the chin groove, as opposed to just below the cheekbone, with the strap on the nasal bone, and never below it. It reminds the horse to keep his mouth closed and prevents the horse from crossing his jaw." -wikipedia
    Young stallions like to open their mouths to whinny, and most horses will cross their jaws when first introduced to the bit. I think the drop is actaully a handy little device.
         
        08-22-2008, 10:07 PM
      #26
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~
    Look at any young stallion videos from any verband.
    "Invented by the Spanish Riding School, this noseband encircles the nose around the chin groove, as opposed to just below the cheekbone, with the strap on the nasal bone, and never below it. It reminds the horse to keep his mouth closed and prevents the horse from crossing his jaw." -wikipedia
    Young stallions like to open their mouths to whinny, and most horses will cross their jaws when first introduced to the bit. I think the drop is actaully a handy little device.
    Hmmm ...since the SRS uses stallions exclusively they will automatically refer to a young horse as a stallion. :roll:

    Up until recently when so many of the new nosebands came to be used, the dropped noseband was used almost on every horse including mares and geldings. Be careful when you make statements that are so sweeping. Dropped were used before the flash as the noseband of choice in all levels until the double was allowed to be used.
         
        08-23-2008, 06:13 PM
      #27
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~
    Bit stops are illegal,
    Ah I see.

    No offense to anyone but I think competition has ruined what dressage was meant to be. I do not think it's good for horses at all.
         
        08-28-2008, 08:06 PM
      #28
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ponyboy
    [The pressure on the poll and chin that a curb provides is what puts the horse in the proper frame. Snaffles only pull straight back, which is why if you try to put a horse in a fame using a snaffle they will open their mouths, so you need a flash noseband to stop that. When you collect a horse in a snaffle you are literally asking them to "stop" and "go" at the same time. A curb makes the horse transfer their weight to the hind end and drop their head vertical, which is how they are supposed to be in dressage. It's about leverage.
    I don't think so...I've seen the exact same results by a girl at my barn riding her horse in a french link
         
        08-29-2008, 06:07 PM
      #29
    Yearling
    Sounds like you're lucky enough to have a horse with natural talent.
         
        09-03-2008, 05:29 AM
      #30
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ponyboy
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by claireauriga
    Heh, a similar discussion goes on here.
    Interesting. I thought the Olympic x-country was great too. I also agree that eventers are in it for the XC - It should be its own sport really.
    not all eventers are in it for the cross country. Why would they spend so much time training for dressage if they liked to hoon. This is said by an eventer btw
         

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