Specializing in dressage
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding

Specializing in dressage

This is a discussion on Specializing in dressage within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • I'm finding it hard to learn dressage
  • Do you start from c or a in dressage

Like Tree1Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    12-23-2011, 05:47 PM
  #1
Foal
Specializing in dressage

I have been wanting to do dressage for a while now, but I was wandering at what stage in your riding did you go from learning general riding skills to being specialized in one area. I can walk, trot and I am learning the canter, but I have lots of bad habits that I am finding very hard to correct.

Do you have to be able to w/t/c before you go into one area of riding, and would it be a lot more expensive? The stables that I am at say that they can teach competition level dressage, but they always have me in a group with people that are much younger than me and are always wanting to "Jump, Jump, Jump!" and the stables don't seem that keen on having people in private lessons. This is where I go for lessons:
About Us | General

Any thoughts? Should I wait and see where I am in a year or so's time and then think about going onto dressage?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    12-23-2011, 06:38 PM
  #2
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by vergo97    
I have been wanting to do dressage for a while now, but I was wandering at what stage in your riding did you go from learning general riding skills to being specialized in one area. I can walk, trot and I am learning the canter, but I have lots of bad habits that I am finding very hard to correct.

Do you have to be able to w/t/c before you go into one area of riding, and would it be a lot more expensive? The stables that I am at say that they can teach competition level dressage, but they always have me in a group with people that are much younger than me and are always wanting to "Jump, Jump, Jump!" and the stables don't seem that keen on having people in private lessons. This is where I go for lessons:
About Us | General

Any thoughts? Should I wait and see where I am in a year or so's time and then think about going onto dressage?

You can start anytime.

HOWEVER to make any serious progress you should have your own horse and be able to do W/T/C reasonable comfortable.

Most people have bad habits ( even dressage riders) but dressage will help you to become more aware of them and be better able to make corrections that produce CONSISTENT reactions from your horse.

Having a trainer that know at least up to the medium level would also be something that you should have to be your eyes on the ground and direct to in the right direction when you go off track so to speak.

It sounds to me like your stable does not have the environment needed to properly get ahead in this discipline and only you can make a choice on what to do from now on.
     
    12-23-2011, 07:14 PM
  #3
Foal
I'm finding it hard to know weather this stables is good for me or not. Its certainly better than the one I used to go to, and they teach me how to tack up and groom, but they don't seem to have an aim for what they are teaching. I'm finding it hard to progress and I don't think I have got any better at cantering in the last month or so. That's partly the reason that my mum has stopped my lessons for a few weeks, because she isn't too sure the stables are doing whats best for me. The stable owner even admitted that the group i'm in isn't best for me, but she hasn't done anything to change it.

The problem is I can't find any good stables that are near to me and all the very good dressage instructors want people to have their own horse (like you said) and are probably very expensive!

There's no way that I will be able to afford my own horse, my mum can only just afford my lessons.

Its hard to know what to do, the stables I'm at aren't doing the best for me, but I can't find anywhere else to go. Maybe I'll just have to wait until I'm older and can possibly afford my own horse.
     
    12-23-2011, 07:22 PM
  #4
Green Broke
I think for basic dressage, you can start any time. Dressage in reality is the basis for most disciplines anyway the same way that Ballet is the basis for most other types of dance.

I think it's odd that your stable says they can teach competition level dressage, that doesn't make sense to me, especially if they are putting you in hunter/jumper classes. Although many aspects are the same as flatwork for hunters, dressage has it's differences too. I used to show hunters back in the 90's and when I bought Cin a couple of years ago (after not owning a horse for 15 years) I decided to go into dressage and there was a bit of a transition, especially since hunter you are much more forward sitting on your horse and when I started dressage I felt like my trainer was making me lay on my back on his butt because it such a different posture.

I say go for it, but I think maybe you should do a little more research on dressage and what you want to learn in order to find a trainer that will teach you correctly for what you want to do. The things that a trainer specializes in can make all the difference and in my opinion (I've had some recent bad experience with a trainer), a trainer can tell you ANYTHING they want, and that they know or can do anything. It's your job to do your research and deem weather or not you should trust in what they say. Ask for References from other dressage riders who have trained with them.
     
    12-24-2011, 08:55 AM
  #5
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by vergo97    
Do you have to be able to w/t/c before you go into one area of riding, and would it be a lot more expensive?

Any thoughts? Should I wait and see where I am in a year or so's time and then think about going onto dressage?
No, you don't have to know. Moreover if you learn something incorrectly it'll take even more time to re-learn it, while if you start from blank scratch you just learn and progress.

Spyder, I disagree about "serious progress" and knowing W/T/C. Total beginner learning to W/T/C correctly in, say, a year makes a HUGE progress IMHO. It all depends on what your purpose is. However, I agree you either want to pay more to ride good horses, or you better have your own horse. Unfortunately lots of lesson horses are not very light and are bouncy, which makes it tougher to learn on. Although that may be still OK if you just learning the very basic stuff.
     
    12-24-2011, 09:11 AM
  #6
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
Spyder, I disagree about "serious progress" and knowing W/T/C.
I used the word "serious progress" in connection to having your own horse. On purpose because while you can learn correctly within the first year, a rank beginner learning the three main gaits rarely if ever attains poise,and knowledge required to go much beyond the basics that are taught on school horses alone. Certainly they could be taught correctly but school horses have never been the best vehicle to learn the nuances that are needed to go beyond the lowest level.
     
    12-24-2011, 09:27 AM
  #7
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder    
I used the word "serious progress" in connection to having your own horse. On purpose because while you can learn correctly within the first year, a rank beginner learning the three main gaits rarely if ever attains poise,and knowledge required to go much beyond the basics that are taught on school horses alone. Certainly they could be taught correctly but school horses have never been the best vehicle to learn the nuances that are needed to go beyond the lowest level.
Depends on school horse. In general yes in my experience, but the trainer I took lessons from couple times used 2nd level horse and GP horse for lessons (I went with 2nd level one as I didn't know how to ride really). Couple other dressage barns I know have schoolmasters to learn on. Not positive it's a good idea to put a beginner on such a horse, but just saying that highly trained horses for lessons definitely exist.
     
    12-24-2011, 05:11 PM
  #8
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by vergo97    
I'm finding it hard to know weather this stables is good for me or not. Its certainly better than the one I used to go to, and they teach me how to tack up and groom, but they don't seem to have an aim for what they are teaching.

There's no way that I will be able to afford my own horse, my mum can only just afford my lessons.

Its hard to know what to do, the stables I'm at aren't doing the best for me, but I can't find anywhere else to go. Maybe I'll just have to wait until I'm older and can possibly afford my own horse.
Can you find a lease horse (or a free lease) that you could take private lessons with? I would look at a different barn. Too many large barns treat lessons like a business transaction rather than a training and learning environment.

Where are you at if you don't mind me asking.?

I don't blame your mom for wanting to stop paying for lessons for those few weeks :/ It doesn't sound like a good learning experience for you.

After every lesson, I have at LEAST five new things to work on, and 3 things to 'perfect.' And a big ol grin on my face and a happy content horse. Try to find that !

And I agree with these ladies below. You can start anytime. I don't even know how to canter yet! But it does help having my own horse. It does really help to have a trainer with experience in dressage showing and hunters. The more the better!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinnys Whinny    
I think for basic dressage, you can start any time. Dressage in reality is the basis for most disciplines anyway the same way that Ballet is the basis for most other types of dance.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
No, you don't have to know. Moreover if you learn something incorrectly it'll take even more time to re-learn it, while if you start from blank scratch you just learn and progress.
     
    12-24-2011, 05:20 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Personally I think it's great you're getting into dressage, but you haven't really mentioned what you're experience is. If you're just getting into things don't limit yourself to just dressage- the world is your oyster!

It is easier on your own horse, I was lucky enough to buy a horse from a friend on the cheap and he turned out to be a fab school master. Any horse can teach you the basics whether it be a school master or a greenie but that depends on your level of riding too.

Looking at the website I would say there is no problems, you don't need a WB to do dressage and cobs do pretty well too, to learn the basics. Walk trot canter change the volocity of the gait, school figures, working a horse correctly from behind and on the contact.

These are all things that come with time and practise, it doesn't come over night. Work on it, enjoy it and do loads of different things. Keep us updated and good luck!
     
    12-24-2011, 05:42 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
Can you find a lease horse (or a free lease) that you could take private lessons with? I would look at a different barn. Too many large barns treat lessons like a business transaction rather than a training and learning environment.

Where are you at if you don't mind me asking.?

I don't blame your mom for wanting to stop paying for lessons for those few weeks :/ It doesn't sound like a good learning experience for you.

After every lesson, I have at LEAST five new things to work on, and 3 things to 'perfect.' And a big ol grin on my face and a happy content horse. Try to find that !
I would really like to lease a horse, but I always thought that people offering their horse want experienced riders. Leasing a horse would be good because I wouldn't keep having to change horses every week, and I could get to know them. When I go to lessons, I never know if I'll be put on a good, forgiving horse or one that bucks when my legs go in the wrong place.

This is the stables that I go to: About Us | General

I think my mum also doesn't know what to do. This stables are nice and care about their horses, more than the other stables that I used to go to anyway, but I'm not learning anything. I hate to admit it, but I haven't actually missed my lessons that much. I feel like I'm not missing out on learning anything.

I would love to leave my lessons having 5 things to work on, I don't think that has ever happened to me yet. I always get told that I'm still working on my canter.

I'll keep an eye out for suitable leases and I'll start looking for somewhere that I could take lessons other than the place I'm at. My mum agrees that I probably should move, but she doesn't think that there is anywhere else that we could go.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bobby's Dressage Bridle, dressage gifts and more from $6 jklfarm Tack and Equipment Classifieds 8 08-30-2011 11:31 PM
pikeur dressage jacket and dressage boots bubblzoo292 Tack and Equipment Classifieds 0 08-31-2009 02:50 PM
Pikeur Dressage Coat and Ariat Dressage Boots jklfarm Tack and Equipment Classifieds 1 01-07-2009 08:22 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0