Tips for a Quiet Seat
 
 

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Tips for a Quiet Seat

This is a discussion on Tips for a Quiet Seat within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Riding with a quiet seat
  • Quieter horseback rider

 
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    07-01-2008, 07:50 PM
  #1
Started
Tips for a Quiet Seat

Hi guys,
I've been noticing when I ride, that there's too much air between me and the saddle when I post. You shouldn't really be able to tell a rider is posting, correct? Like, it should be seemless, easy and quiet. Well, I was just wondering what I can do to develop a "quieter" seat, especially at the posting trot. My posting isn't horrible, by any means, but it could be quieter.

Please help.

Thank you!
     
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    07-01-2008, 08:28 PM
  #2
Foal
Re: Tips for a Quiet Seat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jubilee Rose
Hi guys,
I've been noticing when I ride, that there's too much air between me and the saddle when I post. You shouldn't really be able to tell a rider is posting, correct? Like, it should be seemless, easy and quiet. Well, I was just wondering what I can do to develop a "quieter" seat, especially at the posting trot. My posting isn't horrible, by any means, but it could be quieter.

Please help.

Ok, i've been riding for 15years and I still have my bad days. When you post it should feel like you're "one with the horse"
I always check my stirrups and strap are as long as my arm that always makes sure i'm not flying high.
always have slight pressure on the horse with your thighs and that's what you post with. Also make sure that your horse has a nice even trot. If that doesn't work I have some other suggestions

Thank you!
     
    07-03-2008, 11:17 PM
  #3
Showing
Get someone to put you on a lunge line. Remove your stirrups and tie your reins in a knot. With one hand hold yourself in the saddle and allow yourself to follow the motion for a few strides at a time. Learn that motion and allow your position to adjust to the movement.

Its hard to explain what it is you would do or how it works but riding on a circle without stirrups will allow you to focus on your position and the horse's movement which in turn quiets down your entire position and control of your seat.

Made sense??
     
    07-04-2008, 12:37 PM
  #4
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by My2Geldings
Get someone to put you on a lunge line. Remove your stirrups and tie your reins in a knot. With one hand hold yourself in the saddle and allow yourself to follow the motion for a few strides at a time. Learn that motion and allow your position to adjust to the movement.

Its hard to explain what it is you would do or how it works but riding on a circle without stirrups will allow you to focus on your position and the horse's movement which in turn quiets down your entire position and control of your seat.

Made sense??
Thanks M2G. Yes, that makes sense. I've ridden on the lunge and it's very helpful. I'll have to try holding myself there and posting without stirrups. Thanks!
     
    07-04-2008, 01:25 PM
  #5
Weanling
It's pretty amazing what a difference just riding without stirrups makes. I was just doing some circling and bending with Spree yesterday, both to supple her up and to work on things people have suggested to me. I had been working on sitting deep and keeping my heels down (by dropping my weight into my legs, not shoving the heels down), but when I crossed my stirrups over the pommel, my whole body went "whoa." It takes such concentration and allowing yourself to sit deep with the horse's movement, because you can't rely at all on your stirrups. It's a great exercise.
     
    07-05-2008, 01:17 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Also, think of the post as a "back-forward" motion as opposed to an "up down" motion.

Think of bringing your hips up an inch and forward two inches with each post.

:)
     
    07-05-2008, 05:50 PM
  #7
Started
Missy - I agree, yes. Thanks for the insight. :P

Kickshaw - Ok, that makes sense. Thanks. :)
     
    07-07-2008, 04:29 PM
  #8
Foal
I was told as a young rider to imagine a ceiling just an inch or two above my head and to post as if I was worried about hitting that ceiling. Did the trick for me.


Lunge lessons are great as well because they show you if you truly have an independent seat. Often I find that's where the root of my troubles is to be found.

Check your saddle fit is you have trouble correcting your problem (which I appreciate is not really much of a problem) When the saddle tips backwards, it's almost impossible to post quietly.

Also, check you are not squeezing with your legs.

All the best
Mattie
     

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