Trot help?
 
 

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Trot help?

This is a discussion on Trot help? within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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    • 1 Post By Skyseternalangel
    • 1 Post By Mel20

     
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        08-13-2013, 05:22 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Red face Trot help?

    So.. on thursday I'm going to have my third riding lesson, when I'll ride in trot with a string, in a circle. My teacher said that my position is very good and for others it takes months to get my position.
    Now, I'm a little afraid of the trot because I heard it's very bumpy, and the posting doesn't look so easy. So, I need to know some stuff.
    1. How to make a horse go into trot?
    2. Is trot actually that bumpy and difficult?
    3. Some tips&tricks on how to trot better?
    4. How to post properly?
    5. What does 'sitting' a trot mean and how to do it?

    Okay, thanks and sorry if they're too many questions and if the category is wrong ewe.
         
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        08-13-2013, 05:41 PM
      #2
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mel20    
    So.. on thursday I'm going to have my third riding lesson, when I'll ride in trot with a string, in a circle. My teacher said that my position is very good and for others it takes months to get my position.
    Now, I'm a little afraid of the trot because I heard it's very bumpy, and the posting doesn't look so easy. So, I need to know some stuff.
    1. How to make a horse go into trot?
    2. Is trot actually that bumpy and difficult?
    3. Some tips&tricks on how to trot better?
    4. How to post properly?
    5. What does 'sitting' a trot mean and how to do it?

    Okay, thanks and sorry if they're too many questions and if the category is wrong ewe.
    Congratulations for entering the horsey world! I'll try to answer your questions to the best of my abilities.

    1. It varies depending on the horse/training methods. I squeeze mine with my upper thigh/calf and if they don't respond give a little kick (I also cluck with my mouth). Your trainer will let you know how he/she does things!
    2. Yet again it depends on the horse. I've been on some horses that were very smooth, others that were rough. Lol I didn't find it difficult when I started it just felt different and a bit fast but trust me, it's really not.
    3. When you're trotting remember to take a deep breath, relax and move with the horse. You might bounce around a lot your first few times but trust me, everyone does it and everyone grows out of it.
    4. I was always taught that the stride (you post or go up when the horses outside leg is moving forward) should move you up but you use your thighs/legs to control the severity and ease yourself down (sometimes up lol) your heels are there to absorb weight and an 'emergency handle'. Your trainer will explain it better!
    5. Sitting the trot means just that. Instead of posting you'll sit it like in western riding (where it's seen most commonly). The way I was taught/teach was to relax and allow your body to go limp, when you feel comfortable imagine concrete bags tied to your butt and you can't move anywhere but back and forth, this can be described as to lowering your center of gravity to your hips/butt. Your spine should distribute the shock but no part of your body should be severely stiff (but keep correct posture!) and bounce around too much.

    Don't worry your trainer will show/explain it to you! Have fun!
         
        08-13-2013, 05:49 PM
      #3
    Showing
    1. How to make a horse go into trot?

    Close both calves softly (and get firmer) until the horse changes from a walk into a trot.

    2. Is trot actually that bumpy and difficult?

    The walk is a four beat movement, meaning that in each cycle of walk, every foot moves one at a time.

    The trot is a two beat movement, meaning that in each cycle of trot, diagonal legs move one after the other.

    So the right front leg and the back left leg both reach forward when the front left leg and the back right leg reach back.

    There is a small "hop" of air-time when these leg pairs change from stretching forward to reaching back.

    This "hop" is what pushes your butt out of the saddle. Allowing yourself to be pushed out of the saddle is known as rising/posting.

    Now since gravity is consistently around, you will drop back down within a split second.

    Riding a correct posting trot means you use your muscles to allow yourself to be pushed up steadily, and to cushion the drop.

    At first it'll be easier to push off with your toes (which is WRONG) but you won't have enough strength to use your thigh/core muscles.

    Posting/Rising is NOT an up and down movement.. it's more of a diagonal NW SE movement of your hips.

    3. Some tips&tricks on how to trot better?

    Work on your core strength off the horse. Don't anticipate it and be afraid of jostling around on the back of the horse. Don't tense up or hold on tight with your legs.

    4. How to post properly?

    Let the horse push you up, open your hips towards your hands, and softly sit back down in the center of your seat. It helps to hold onto the front of the saddle (not the pad..)

    5. What does 'sitting' a trot mean and how to do it?

    Sitting a trot means you absorb the impact of the "hop." For that reason it is quite tricky, and for some horses with a bigger "hop" it can be harder to sit at first.

    Again, it's all about strengthening that core and learning to use your muscles to suck you into the saddle.
    smrobs likes this.
         
        08-13-2013, 05:56 PM
      #4
    Foal
    Thank you guys for the help, you were so fast. XD I'll try my best ^^
    Incitatus32 likes this.
         
        08-13-2013, 08:02 PM
      #5
    Foal
    I just restarted my lessons, so this is so helpful!!
    Are you using a lesson horse? If so, they maybe a bit dull or lazy. I was taught to ask, tell, then demand.

    So when asking for a trot from a walk, I would squeeze my calves gently. Some horses this will work, some wont. If this doesn't work, I will squeeze harder and make a kissing sound. Sometimes you will have to give a little kick

    I find posting trot quite natural, the momentum will push you out of the saddle. For me, is recognizing the right diagonal that I fail. Rise and fall with the legs on the wall. So you rise up when you see the outside shoulder moves. For the life of me, I can't get this right.... Your trainer will tell you though. If its wrong, you sit for 2 beats to get on the right diagonal.

    Do not be tempted to push yourself up with your toes, (I did that) and ended up having my heels towards the sky... Very embarrassing. Use your core muscle to pull yourself through, it's not an up and down, rather diagonal movement. Like thrusting your pelvis forward. Keep your legs steady and tight through the barrel of the horse.

    I hope this helps!
         
        08-17-2013, 08:42 PM
      #6
    Foal
    To trot, sit as you normally would and squeeze with both legs. If the horse doesn't respond, squeeze a bit harder. Its also helpful to shorten your reins. Usually instructors give you time to get used to trot before you rise. The aim of rising is to keep your lower legs still (heels down!) and stand out of the saddle and back down, every beat of the 1, 2, 1 ,2 pace. Don't over do it so you are standing above the front of the saddle. Once you are used to rising, you will probably learn how to rise on the right diagonal. When riding in a ring, take a peek down at your horse's (front)outside shoulder. When the outside leg/shoulder moves forward, you should rise, when it moves back, you should sit. Sometimes it may look right, but if you try the other way, it should be correct (well, that's what happens to me). If you are on the wrong diagonal, just sit for two beats then rise again.

    Sitting trot it harder. You need to sit in the saddle to the trot. Make sure your heels are down, and sit back on your tailbone but keep your back loose and straight. Don't stiffen up or you will bounce around like a sack of potatoes. If its really bumpy, ask your horse to slow down a fraction. If its helpful, rise when you slow him down.
    Good luck and have fun! You're a step closer to cantering!
         
        08-17-2013, 10:16 PM
      #7
    Weanling
    Some horses are bouncier than others so sitting a trot will therefore be harder on some horses than others and you'll just have to get used to the horse you're riding. The basic idea if you want to sit a trot is to just relax and sort of melt onto the horse and let them move you. Don't slouch, but keep your body relaxed and remember to breathe. That will make sure that your core muscles stay at ease, making it easier to isolate your hip movement from your upper body movement.

    As far as posting trot goes, once you get the rhythm right it will become very easy. Again, let the horse move you as their movement will naturally push you upwards. Keep your heels down and try to rise not exactly upwards but sort of forwards as well. If you have a hard time or feel insecure in your balance, you can try taking a handful of mane until you get used to the feeling and you can let go. I personally found it harder to learn like that but it works for some people.
         

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