Using the hind end - The Horse Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 06-08-2008, 06:38 PM Thread Starter
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Using the hind end

I understand that for a horse to use itself efficiently and move in a healthy way, all of the power has to come from the hind end. The hind end must be under the horse, causing the horse to lift through the forehand.

I'm 1/2 leasing a pony and she really enjoys falling onto her forehand.
I've been working with her on circles to get her to balance, and doing lots of direction changes and transitions. We work on a bit of leg yielding (beginning lateral work) and I work her on the lunge line often.

She's still a bit green, so with time that'll improve through ground work - but my question is:

Does anybody have any suggestions to help this pony stay off her forehand? My last gelding did it, and it was hard to get out of him and took a lot of time and effort. I don't want to bore the pony, so I'd appreciate any suggestions to help her to accept contact better and carry herself consistently. New exercises would be great!
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post #2 of 10 Old 06-08-2008, 06:53 PM
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Lots of halt to trot and halt to canter transitions. You can use a dressage whip to tap the pony's butt up and make her step up under herself. Lateral movements are good as well. Trot poles can help strengthen the hind end as well. Working on a hill (walking/trotting/cantering up and down, or backing the horse up the hill) work wonders to develop the buttocks. You can't expect a horse to come off the front end right away; they need to develop those hindquarter muscles in order to actually be able to accomplish it.


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post #3 of 10 Old 06-09-2008, 09:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt
Lots of halt to trot and halt to canter transitions. You can use a dressage whip to tap the pony's butt up and make her step up under herself. Lateral movements are good as well. Trot poles can help strengthen the hind end as well. Working on a hill (walking/trotting/cantering up and down, or backing the horse up the hill) work wonders to develop the buttocks. You can't expect a horse to come off the front end right away; they need to develop those hindquarter muscles in order to actually be able to accomplish it.
I agree with JDI. Also how old is the pony?

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post #4 of 10 Old 06-09-2008, 09:37 PM Thread Starter
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She's six :)
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post #5 of 10 Old 06-10-2008, 08:24 AM
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Oh, bc sometime the age s he problem! But that's a good age so just do what JDI said to do! I hope that helps.

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post #6 of 10 Old 06-10-2008, 10:47 AM
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Oh, and also make your horse back up, then spring right away into a trot or canter - no halt, no walk steps.... this makes them have to rocket off their hindquarter only.


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post #7 of 10 Old 06-16-2008, 07:59 PM
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an extension of what JDI said, do trasition within a pace, so slow right down to almost walking (in trot) then really push out for a strong working trot, then halt, then forwards to strong trot again, canter..alomst trot, then push out strong etc
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post #8 of 10 Old 06-16-2008, 08:11 PM
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I agree with everyone else, but also my friend had the problem with her mare, mainly when jumping. She has this bit that she uses and combines that with lifting her hands and it makes her horse less heavy on the frontend. Idk what bit it is but ill ask and let you knoww.

[chad]

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post #9 of 10 Old 06-16-2008, 11:17 PM
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Sorry to disagree, but you don't need a certain bit to help this. Gaining muscle in the hindquarter through the transitions suggested is what is needed. Good luck!!

"'For I know the plans I have for you,' declares the Lord. 'Plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you a hope and a future'" ~ Jeremiah 29:11



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post #10 of 10 Old 06-17-2008, 01:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaddd
I agree with everyone else, but also my friend had the problem with her mare, mainly when jumping. She has this bit that she uses and combines that with lifting her hands and it makes her horse less heavy on the frontend. Idk what bit it is but ill ask and let you knoww.
Probably an elevator bit:

However, I honestly think that proper training should do the trick... changing bits is sometimes a good idea, but I like to use it as a last resort


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