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Using Your Weight to Turn?

This is a discussion on Using Your Weight to Turn? within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • How riders should sit on a horse
  • Using weight to turn horse

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    10-30-2011, 10:24 AM
  #11
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilikehorses95    
the weight controls the speed and it is used to put your horse on the hindquarters in jumping and cross. In the show ring your suppose to smile and show as little movement as possible in hunter so you would mostly try to move him with as little movement as possible by your hands meaning that since the legs are less obvious to the judge you would use then more often to move your horse.
Um... weight controls balance, not speed. Your seat can control speed, in a way, by either creating driving or ******ing energy(tilt pelvis back and flatten back to drive, tilt pelvis forward and put more S-curve in the back to ******). Legs create energy together to drive the hindquarters forward, or independently to move the ribcage and control the hind legs more precisely for lateral work. What puts the horse more on his hindquarters, in my understanding is the creation of energy via seat and legs, and the recycling of that energy through the hands. As far as I know, that applies over fences as well as on the flat.

I can't think of much that is less conspicuous than a simple weight shift to control your horse's balance, thereby influencing his direction, gait, or speed?
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    10-30-2011, 10:29 AM
  #12
Foal
Ilikehorses95: I know your supposed to move as little as possible, and I try to do that. My main goal every time I ride is get the horse to do their best, and not necessarily what looks the best. They is because I usually ride the horses that no one else likes because they are difficult.

Scoutrider: My instructor told me not to use my weight because it would cause me to lean, and it would put me in a bad position if he spooked.

I have yet to try not using my weight to turn, but I have a feeling that I would become very tense if I did.
     
    10-30-2011, 10:30 AM
  #13
Foal

How balanced rider should look

Proper balanced rider

True or not true when jumping your suppose to get off the horse's back, and when going downhill your suppose to sit more into your set
     
    10-30-2011, 10:31 AM
  #14
Foal

How balanced rider should look

Proper balanced rider

True or not true when jumping your suppose to get off the horse's back, and when going downhill your suppose to sit more into your set
     
    10-30-2011, 10:33 AM
  #15
Foal
Tianimalz: I haven't showed that much either so don't worry. :) That's about the same method I use, and as you mentioned it has yet to fail me too.
     
    10-30-2011, 10:37 AM
  #16
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpottedDraftRider    
Scoutrider: My instructor told me not to use my weight because it would cause me to lean, and it would put me in a bad position if he spooked.

I have yet to try not using my weight to turn, but I have a feeling that I would become very tense if I did.
There's a difference between shifting weight and leaning - perhaps your instructor is seeing you lean, and is hoping that my getting you to think about not using your weight, you'll correct the lean without losing your weight aids? A few times in my riding lesson career, my instructor has had me think about not doing something, or over correcting, to get the right idea in practice - the big one for me was always being told to lean back - sitting straight is what is needed, but to get really straight I had to think of leaning too far back... if that makes sense, lol. Perhaps your instructor is trying to get you to do something similar?

I love Sally Swift's discussion of weight aids; visualizing it as mentally moving more weight into one leg, thinking of one leg as heavier than the other. The thought often does enough to shift your weight properly. If you are actually leaning, you're trying too hard.
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    10-30-2011, 10:38 AM
  #17
Foal
Having just attended a Larry Whitesell clinic in St. Croix Falls Wi. I have a whole new way of riding and its wonderful! We were taught to use only our pelvic to turn.. When you use JUST your pelvic the rest of your body automatically turns with it and its very undetectable. We also use our weight to slow down or speed up our horses... I no longer use my heels to "WALK ON" but instead gently "Roll the BALL".. meaning I use my pelvic in a forward motion curling my lower back forward. To slow down my horse I straighten my back and sit my butt gently but deeply into the saddle. My normally Jiggy mare loves my new way of riding and the cues are so subtle one can hardly know what I'm doing..... It has made a great difference in my communications with my mare and we are both so much more happy on the trail...
     
    10-30-2011, 10:38 AM
  #18
Foal
Ilikehorses95: According to your coach you are supposed to remain in the center at all times, right?
     
    10-30-2011, 10:45 AM
  #19
Foal
Scoutrider: My mom was watching me ride (She has been riding for 20+ years now) and she said that I wasn't leaning one bit. My instructor also didn't tell me that I was leaning at all during the lesson. Otherwise that is what I thought at first. I will have to look into Sally Swift.

Deej: I will have to try this method in my lesson. I haven't heard of something like this, and I think it is worth the try. Thank you.
     
    10-30-2011, 10:51 AM
  #20
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilikehorses95    
True or not true when jumping your suppose to get off the horse's back, and when going downhill your suppose to sit more into your set
Sorry, it looks like you had a second image attached under the one of the rider in the red sweater? It's not coming up...

As far as jumping, you're precisely correct that that is what you do, but that has very little to do with speed or directional control. In that case, the idea of jumping position, or shifting your weight forward or back with incline, is all about maintaining balance with your mount's center of gravity. Leaning forward while going downhill overloads the forehand, and makes it harder for the horse to negotiate the terrain. "Getting off the horse's back" while going over a fence is still about balance, about allowing the horse to "do his thing" with minimal rider interference. It's a different use of the weight; staying out of the way, rather than influencing, as in the case of a transition (change in direction, gait, speed, or balance).
     

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