Walk to Canter - Page 2
 
 

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Walk to Canter

This is a discussion on Walk to Canter within the English Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        10-22-2008, 08:53 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SonnyWimps    
    If you go bareback I find #2 is easier...but that's just me.

    I do not feel kicking a horse is good to get a horse to go faster. It will just make them hard sided and they won't listen to your leg cues at all.
    I agree, squeeze one leg then the other works rly well!!!
         
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        10-23-2008, 08:07 AM
      #12
    Yearling
    Well, with lesson horses who are used to being ridden by people of varying abilities from total beginner up to pretty decent ... at my old stables they work on a principle of:

    1. Squeeze.
    2. If horse does not respond, give a sharper nudge/kick with heels or whole leg.
    3. If horse does not respond, tap with crop.

    You're not going to get beautifully sensitive lesson horses who will automatically understand every rider's different seat aids and so on. They know what they can get away with and you have to be firm with them.

    It would be nice if the horses all listened to a gentle squeeze every time, but the way that they are ridden, by so many different riders, is such that this is very difficult to train into them.
         
        10-24-2008, 12:24 PM
      #13
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by claireauriga    
    Well, with lesson horses 1. Squeeze.
    2. If horse does not respond, give a sharper nudge/kick with heels or whole leg.
    3. If horse does not respond, tap with crop.

    .

    Agreed.
    Often a lesson horse is rather wiley, and is testing you to see how much you know. They want to know if they are going to have to work, or if they can ignore you. Much like a classroom with a substitute teacher.

    I have ridden a few "deadsided" horses and it was an ugly experience. My thought would be to pull them and re-train... keep them away from beginners.
         
        10-24-2008, 02:43 PM
      #14
    Green Broke
    The thing that surprises me is that she was not a lesson horse and she is half Arab so she like to go go go!!! She is doing ALOT better now that I have tried everyones advice!!

    !!!Thanks!!!
         
        10-26-2008, 01:05 PM
      #15
    Started
    My horse struggled with this...
    It could be that your horse isn't quite muscular enough to do this transition and maintain a nice speed, or it could be stubbornness.

    What I did was I would ask for the lope from the walk. If my horse would pick up the jog or that hideous "I-don't-want-to-canter" trot then you stop them, pick up the walk, and ask for it again. And keep doing it until they produce the results you want. It really does work...at least after a while:roll:
         
        11-11-2008, 12:36 AM
      #16
    Trained
    Personally, my biggest requirement before I ask for the walk-canter transition is that my horse can clearly differentiate the trot aid and the canter aid. My trot aid is a hlf halt, squezze with my seat and pressure with both legs. My canter cue is half halt, Sit deep, and cue with my outside leg ONLY. This brings the outside hind under, and once they figure it out it is very easy to strike them off on the correct lead. Another big pre-requisite is MORE collection through the trot-canter transition. My horse needs to be able to calmy and smoothly take the canter, with a strong contact and moving forward into the bit. Without these two things solid, the horse will be confused about what your asking, and will try to run into the canter. For any trabnsition my horse needs to be slightly rocked back onto his hind.

    For the actuall walk-canter transition, I want a very collected walk, very forward off my leg. Depending on the lead you want, there is a different time to cue. Practise feeling your horses belly swing as you walk. I was always taught that you cue the canter when their belly is swung away from the leading leg, so to the outside of your circle. I will half halt, sit realllly deep and put that outside leg on, keeping a strong inside rein.

    Not sure if that will make sense, but it worked for me and my arab now has the awesomest walk-canter transitions! So much fun and easy!
         
        11-14-2008, 12:20 PM
      #17
    Foal
    SonnyWimps: I would like to make a correction, leaning forward wouldn't be the correct way, even if it helped. You must always stay back in transitions.. :)

    My advice is to shorten the reins, lean back, stay in a circle or at a corner, then turn the horses head to the outside (towards the fence/wall), put our outside leg (the one by the fence/wall) back and inside leg forward right behind the girth or even on the girth, and squeeze/kick.

    There's millions of ways of fixing this problem, it really all depends on the horse. It would be easier for me to see a video where you attempt this, but as I read in an earlier comment, you don't have a video, so I guess you'll just have to try figuring it out, we can only give you small advice. :)
         
        11-15-2008, 12:51 AM
      #18
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Vicizmax    
    My advice is to shorten the reins, lean back, stay in a circle or at a corner, then turn the horses head to the outside (towards the fence/wall), put our outside leg (the one by the fence/wall) back and inside leg forward right behind the girth or even on the girth, and squeeze/kick.
    If you did that to my horse you would get a counter canter.....assuming he would even want to canter, being off balance and crooked.
         
        11-15-2008, 04:56 AM
      #19
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Spyder    
    If you did that to my horse you would get a counter canter.....assuming he would even want to canter, being off balance and crooked.
    If that happens, then you are doing it wrong.
    That is the way I learned to get a horse to gallop correctly if it keeps starting in the wrong gallop.

    I guess maybe you shouldn't use this advice since I can't explain how to do this correctly in words. I could make a video explaining this, but if there's other advice that helps, then I couldn't be bothered.. :)

    But its something about "shifting" the weight on the horses outside leg, so the inside leg gets "lighter" and the horse automatically goes in the right gallop, as the head is turned on the outside, but the body is still going in a circle/corner to the inside. Confusing, I'm sorry.. xD

    So never mind, good luck though!
         
        11-15-2008, 09:29 AM
      #20
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Vicizmax    
    If that happens, then you are doing it wrong.
    That is the way I learned to get a horse to gallop correctly if it keeps starting in the wrong gallop.

    I guess maybe you shouldn't use this advice since I can't explain how to do this correctly in words. I could make a video explaining this, but if there's other advice that helps, then I couldn't be bothered.. :)

    But its something about "shifting" the weight on the horses outside leg, so the inside leg gets "lighter" and the horse automatically goes in the right gallop, as the head is turned on the outside, but the body is still going in a circle/corner to the inside. Confusing, I'm sorry.. xD

    So never mind, good luck though!
    What you are explaining is putting the horse in a crooked position to attain the canter. Any method to attain the canter (gallop) can be considered correct as long as the horse's balance is not compromised.

    In dressage no trainer of quality will ever use crookedness to achieve a specific goal.

    Initially on a young horse where a canter aid is not understood the outside leg will be used to PREVENT the haunches from swinging out (also called crookedness). The haunches swinging out will overload the inside shoulder and while the horse will probably canter on the correct lead he will do so simply because the weight/balance forces the inside lead to be picked up. This would be natural for a horse to do since its balance at this stage is weak. A rider may at this stage even lean forward and increase the weight on the inside shoulder to do exactly this also. To prolong an aggressive outside leg once the horse has learned the aid can result in a horse that will now go crooked to the inside with the haunches bent inwards. I have seen this too many times and have marked down horses that exhibit this fault in compititions.

    As the horse gets stronger the rider should try to use the outside leg less and only if the horse exhibits a haunches out desire. This type of horse wants to go crooked and the rider should prevent this. If training is progressing well then the utilization of the outside leg becomes less and less and the rider will come to a point that the closing and "scooping up" of the inside hip leg will be all that is required to attain the canter on the lead desired.

    The correct aids for the half pass is the ourside leg against the horse where it will move away from that pressure and along with a correct bend will cross its legs and move over. The problem I had with one student is that she continued to use the outside leg aid for the canter and the horse cantered every time she wanted the half pass. She had to go to the lesser aid (insidehip/leg) at the canter and after she did she had no problems with the half pass.

    If a problem arises in a canter lead the rider could try to attain the canter through the shoulder in position and via turning.
         

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