What Bad Riding Habits REALLY Bug You to See? - Page 11 - The Horse Forum
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post #101 of 179 Old 06-29-2012, 06:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty View Post
Because you don't throw your reins up their necks and leave them to fend for themselves
A young dressage horse, fresh from the breakers so has no idea about collection, going into a 'frame' etc. is ridden very forward, motoring off their hind legs, into a very light, elastic contact on the bridle. The contact is essential for connecting the hind legs, to the back, to the bridle and to the riders hand.
It does not take long at all (in fact, most breakers under a good, unobstrusive rider, will be starting to stretch from the wither into the bridle within only a few rides after backing.

All we care about, is that the horse goes forward off the leg with active hind legs. He is ridden in this manner until he develops the srength to develop a little more carrying power behind, and can then begin to slightly shorten the frame. This is when the horse will start developing a good reaction to the rider's seat. The seat takes the job of the hand, in becoming the 'restraining aid' and can begin to influence the speed and carrying capactity of the hind legs.
In creating drive in the hind legs, with the 'driving aids' (riders leg), and containing this power through the seat to control the speed and carrying capactity of the hind leg, and completing the circuit with the hind, keeping a light contact with the horse's mouth - he will naturally begin to come into the typical 'frame' that you see in a dressage horse. The stronger he gets, the shorter and more uphill this 'frame' becomes. No need to pull on their mouth to pull the head down. The contact and restraining aid of the seat does the work, and saves the horse's mouth.
So true kyaty!
Joidigm, if you get the back end correct you dont need to worry about the front end as it naturaly falls into place. But that takes riding from your seat properly.
This is Reeco the first time I sat on him which was about the 4th time he had ever been sat on
He started as this

5 mins later we had this:


Then we went on a hack up the road and were offered this:




and this is him 9 weeks later, I have always ridden from my seat and he seeks out the lightest of contacts (like holding a budgie in your fist, got to be very very gentle). No fiddling with the reins, no taking a hold or anything just allowing him to work up unto my hands.


I hate horses who you have to hold onto thier mouths or fiddle with your reins to get anything, it is created by riders wiggling to reins untill the horse drops behind the contact to avoid it, or by riders widening thier hands and riding with thier hands on thier knees so that the horse has to drop its head to avoid the downward pressure on thier jaw. Its a **** pain to try and reschool as well because everytime you take a contact the horse will drop behind it.
I'd far rather see a horse above the bridle than behind it!
Kayty, Chiilaa, Horsealot and 1 others like this.

RIDE your horse FORWARDS and keep him STRAIGHT

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post #102 of 179 Old 06-29-2012, 07:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty View Post
He is very much on the forehand, with no engagement and the back is hollowed behind the saddle indicating that he is stiffening the back and not swinging. Comfy to sit on, but not correct ;) It may well build up muscle over the neck, but the back will stay undeveloped and the hind quarters will not develop any strength or pushing power - which then defeats the purpose of long and low used in the sense of a dressage exercise.
That was a previous horse - BAD long and low :P

on my current horse it's a totally different feeling, much more uphill and powerful!

A CLEAN SLATE FOR THE FUTURE
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post #103 of 179 Old 06-29-2012, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by faye View Post


So, in this picture, is this horse using his hind end more/is he collected? *Confused*
This is really OT :p

Intermediate Rider~Learning Equitation and English Pleasure~Interested in Eventing
A horse will tell you everything you need to know about him, if you listen.
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post #104 of 179 Old 06-29-2012, 10:46 AM
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correcting other peoples bad methods

Quote:
Originally Posted by faye View Post
So true kyaty!
I hate horses who you have to hold onto thier mouths or fiddle with your reins to get anything, it is created by riders wiggling to reins untill the horse drops behind the contact to avoid it, or by riders widening thier hands and riding with thier hands on thier knees so that the horse has to drop its head to avoid the downward pressure on thier jaw. Its a **** pain to try and reschool as well because everytime you take a contact the horse will drop behind it.
I'd far rather see a horse above the bridle than behind it!
Oh England!!! I miss it so much I have never seen anyone riding on the roads around the part of the US I live in and there are lots of horses and yards just in our rural town alone. Allowing a horse to find its own natural balance is the right way to go and surprising how quickly that happens and the head carriage comes right without all the contraptions and nagging at the mouth. Most people I knew over there hacked there showhorses/competition horses out regularly, I'm sure it keeps them sweeter and sharper but at the same time they have to be used to so much more going on around them. I tried a lot of horses over here that had never been ridden anywhere but in a school situation or on a showground.
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post #105 of 179 Old 06-29-2012, 11:24 AM
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This boy, I would always be asked to tap the reins on to bring his nose down. I'm not pulling on him, I don't yank on his face. He swaps back and forth between basic english and western riding. He's not green by any means, but I wouldn't call him dead broke either, although he is very mellow. I was being taught to teach him to get into frame during my lessons. QH with the most horrid trot I have ever ridden; tapping the reins told him to bring his nose down and it helped him round out and smooth his trot out.




Think of it not as a failure but as a success in how not to do it.

Don't look in a horses mouth for a gift.
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post #106 of 179 Old 06-29-2012, 11:32 AM
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head carriage

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joidigm View Post
This boy, I would always be asked to tap the reins on to bring his nose down. I'm not pulling on him, I don't yank on his face. He swaps back and forth between basic english and western riding. He's not green by any means, but I wouldn't call him dead broke either, although he is very mellow. I was being taught to teach him to get into frame during my lessons. QH with the most horrid trot I have ever ridden; tapping the reins told him to bring his nose down and it helped him round out and smooth his trot out.



I would actually call his head carriage overbent for the pace he seems to be going at (middle trot?). A horse will generally extend his foreleg stride to the line of his nose so you will end up with him feeling rather choppy and basically not going forwards as well as you want him too
Might be just the photo but is that throatlatch a little tight?
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post #107 of 179 Old 06-29-2012, 11:35 AM
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Maybe the teeny iPhone screen is making it hard to see but he doesn't look like his back is lifted in the pics.

Even if it's not, of course he's going to be smoother without his head craned into the air. When they go into giraffe mode they're going to be in an unnatural and strained position so their feet will be moving awkwardly.
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post #108 of 179 Old 06-29-2012, 12:25 PM
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Honestly, the things that really bother me, are the habits that bother/hurt the horse.

Last year I heard a conversation between two women, the one was laughing as she described how she took her novice son riding in the mountains on his pony. He had always been allowed to ride by himself with no proper instruction. In this story, his pony was trotting and he wanted him to stop, so he was yanking on the reins and kicking with his spurs until the poor pony was trotting along with its head pulled to its chest. The mother was laughing about what a good dressage pony he would make

I see so many riders with harsh hands and spurs, to the point of abusive, riding horses that arnt properly trained, being dragged around with harsh bits, spurred constantly and yanked to a stop with mouths gaping.

Bad seats(while claiming experience), with bouncing all over at the trot, bouncing/leaning way back at the canter, leaning on the horses mouth to maintain ballance.

It all comes down to humilty and the desire for knowledge. If you are close minded and overly prideful, you'll never accept correction or work to be better.
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post #109 of 179 Old 06-29-2012, 01:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
I would actually call his head carriage overbent for the pace he seems to be going at (middle trot?). A horse will generally extend his foreleg stride to the line of his nose so you will end up with him feeling rather choppy and basically not going forwards as well as you want him too
Might be just the photo but is that throatlatch a little tight?
I was still new to riding when this was taken. And I had just switched over to a non gaited horse, having learned on a TWH. I don't remember his throat latch being tight, I tend to leave them looser, so maybe it is the position of his head.

He wasn't really a giraffe, he'd just pick his nose up and look everywhere but to his rider.

Think of it not as a failure but as a success in how not to do it.

Don't look in a horses mouth for a gift.
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post #110 of 179 Old 06-29-2012, 01:41 PM
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The one thing that REALLY gets me is flapping chicken elbows. When I see it, I was to super glue peoples arms to their sides.

"all I ever dreamt about was makin' it; they ain't giving it, I'm taking it"
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