Wondering about some things on my horse I have on trial... - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 06-11-2012, 11:28 AM Thread Starter
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Wondering about some things on my horse I have on trial...

Hi, I thought I posted this thread already, but I can't find it for the life of me, so forgive me if you're seeing this twice.

I have a horse on trial for a couple of weeks that I'm considering buying; just needed some insight.

He's a lower level eventer and deemed a foxhunting "prospect."
What makes a prospect? Is it their genetics? Is it the propensity to enjoy certain things (i.e field preference as opposed to a ring)?
I'm hoping to foxhunt him (he did great on a hunt trailride this weekend), and obviously the only missing element was the hounds. But I've always wondered how people figured their horse was a prospect for something.

Also, how is price determined?
She commands $6000 for this horse, which, if he's able to foxhunt, I'll gladly pay. I know training plays a factor, but he's only been trained for about 3 years; are other factors such as temperament considered?

This horse has an issue with his stifle and I'm going to get him vetted this week before I decide to buy him or not. I'll see what the vet says about his stifle, but other than that, he's a great horse.
If he has a stifle issue, should price reflect that, or is it a common issue that's easy maintenance?

Thanks in advance!

P.S. wasn't sure what category to put this thread in!
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post #2 of 12 Old 06-11-2012, 11:41 AM
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depends on what the stiffle issue is, lots of horses for sale that dotn have medical problems.

"prospect" is generally a pretty meaningless term. I guess you could loosely say if the horse is generally the right breed or shape for a sport it's a prospect.

I find it laughable that people that hear I do endurance want to pawn off every out of control barely trained horse that likes to run off on them, to me as a great endurance horse prospect. Usually because "they have alot of go". Even though they have never been on an endurance ride, nor ever seen an endurance ride or even have a clue about the sport.

So basically any horse I hear as a "prospect" I take with an entire block of salt.
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post #3 of 12 Old 06-11-2012, 11:50 AM
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Being a 'prospect' only means the owner thinks he might do well at a particular discipline given his temperament, conformation, and physical abilities. Doesn't mean the horse will able to do it, just that if everything aligns properly he/she should be a good candidate.

You need to road him with the hounds. Many horses do very well at hunter paces, but can't handle the frenetic energy of the hunt hounds. The sooner the better, especially if you're wanting to go with one of the flights and not just hilltop.

I'd want to know what his stifle issue is, as foxhunting is a physically demanding sport for both rider and horse.

I also think $6,000 is rather high for a 'prospect'. I'd think a fully trained foxhunter would go for that, not a green bean. But a horse is worth what someone's willing to pay, so if you think it's a good deal, then it's entirely up to you.

I see you're in Middleburg, which is smack dab in hunt country, and I know horses go for much higher there than out here in the boonies of VA. I have my own foxhunting prospect, and he cost me zero dollars to acquire. I've been working on trail riding him, then I'll be introducing him to foxhunting by hilltopping first. TBs off the track make great foxhunters, as a general rule.

Last edited by Speed Racer; 06-11-2012 at 11:54 AM.
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post #4 of 12 Old 06-11-2012, 11:54 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d View Post
depends on what the stiffle issue is, lots of horses for sale that dotn have medical problems.

"prospect" is generally a pretty meaningless term. I guess you could loosely say if the horse is generally the right breed or shape for a sport it's a prospect.

I find it laughable that people that hear I do endurance want to pawn off every out of control barely trained horse that likes to run off on them, to me as a great endurance horse prospect. Usually because "they have alot of go". Even though they have never been on an endurance ride, nor ever seen an endurance ride or even have a clue about the sport.

So basically any horse I hear as a "prospect" I take with an entire block of salt.
So basically, "prospect" is a complete gamble...
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post #5 of 12 Old 06-11-2012, 12:01 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Speed Racer View Post
Being a 'prospect' only means the owner thinks he might do well at a particular discipline given his temperament, conformation, and physical abilities. Doesn't mean the horse will able to do it, just that if everything aligns properly he/she should be a good candidate.

You need to road him with the hounds. Many horses do very well at hunter paces, but can't handle the frenetic energy of the hunt hounds. The sooner the better, especially if you're wanting to go with one of the flights and not just hilltop.

I'd want to know what his stifle issue is, as foxhunting is a physically demanding sport for both rider and horse.

I also think $6,000 is rather high for a 'prospect'. I'd think a fully trained foxhunter would go for that, not a green bean. But a horse is worth what someone's willing to pay, so if you think it's a good deal, then it's entirely up to you.

I see you're in Middleburg, which is smack dab in hunt country, and I know horses go for much higher there than out here in the boonies of VA. I have my own foxhunting prospect, and he cost me zero dollars to acquire. I've been working on trail riding him, then I'll be introducing him to foxhunting by hilltopping first. TBs off the track make great foxhunters, as a general rule.
I was thinking the same thing about his price; the only problem is, foxhunting is off season right now, so I can't take him out with hounds.

As far as his stifle issue, she explained that is was rather a neurological issue (shivers) that she just gave cortisone injections every year, but that it didn't prevent her from eventing him.

You're right, horses do go for a lot more here, which is why I got this horse in Central Virginia. I need a horse that's already made, as I don't want to take the time or money to have it trained; rather pay more money upfront for an already trained horse. At this point, I avoid thoroughbreds :)
I have a preference for draft crosses, that aren't too drafty!
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post #6 of 12 Old 06-11-2012, 12:12 PM
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Are you affiliated with a hunt at all? You can always ask the Master of Hounds to let you ride out on a day when they're cubbing the young hounds, as they do it from horseback as well as on foot. They do that off season.

You're really just trying to find out how the horse will react to a pack of hounds, correct? You don't actually have to foxhunt to find that out.

You said you wanted an already made horse but this guy is an eventer, not a foxhunter. So in essence, he's not trained for foxhunting. Yes, his eventing training will be useful in foxhunting, but he's still an unknown in that discipline.

Hey, as long as you feel comfortable with and on the horse, that's all that really matters.
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post #7 of 12 Old 06-11-2012, 12:17 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Speed Racer View Post
Are you affiliated with a hunt at all? You can always ask the Master of Hounds to let you ride out on a day when they're cubbing the young hounds, as they do it from horseback as well as on foot. They do that off season.

You're really just trying to find out how the horse will react to a pack of hounds, correct? You don't actually have to foxhunt to find that out.

You said you wanted an already made horse but this guy is an eventer, not a foxhunter. So in essence, he's not trained for foxhunting. Yes, his eventing training will be useful in foxhunting, but he's still an unknown in that discipline.

Hey, as long as you feel comfortable with and on the horse, that's all that really matters.
You know, I do feel comfortable on him and I think he's a great horse.
I usually just cap and am not affiliated with a certain hunt; also the problem with that is, I only have him on trial for one more week, and I'm not sure how plausible it is to get that arranged in the next week. I think I'm more concerned about his stifle!!
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post #8 of 12 Old 06-11-2012, 12:19 PM
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Yep, my major concern right now would be his stifle issue. Whichever way that goes will determine whether you keep this boy or start looking again.

Good luck with that. Hope everything works out for you.
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post #9 of 12 Old 06-11-2012, 12:20 PM
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I have a horse with a stifle injury, and its very unpredictable. She'll be fine and perfectly sound for weeks or even months and then one day, she'll become so lame (in the middle of riding her) that she seems as though she can't put any weight on that leg. You have to get off, do some massage (something our equine therapist showed us) and then walk/jog it out. Generally she will be all better within 10 minutes or so, but that's not any consolation when you miss a hunt (or in our case a class). So although your stifle injury may be something totally different, I would be very hesitant to get another horse with a stifle injury.
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post #10 of 12 Old 06-11-2012, 12:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katyusha View Post
So basically, "prospect" is a complete gamble...

yes. Although, buying a horse is always a bit of a gamble, less so, if you do all your homework!

Prospect, is a legit term, in my opinion, if the horse has breeding, training, ability and conformation to suggest they might be successful at doing whatever the owners is touting them as.
If a 4 year old QH is cow-bred and has been sent to a reining trainer, I wouldn't consider him a barrel prospect, even though he may have the build/speed/power to potentially be good at running barrels.
If however, he had been sent to a barrel trainer, I would consider him to be a barrel prospect and *possibly* a cowhorse prospect, depending on his build and abilities.

Basically, it's a very subjective term. I wouldn't give it much value, unless a breeder (a well respected, legit breeder) or trainer (legit, well respected trainer) told me a certain horse were a 'prospect'. Otherwise, it's probably just a marketing tactic.



Good luck on your quest for a foxhunter!
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